Daniel Memorial, Inc.

IMPROVING THE ODDS FOR KIDS

aka Daniel Kids   |   Jacksonville, FL   |  http://www.danielkids.org

Mission

Daniel Memorial, founded in 1884, is the oldest child-serving agency in Florida. The agency motto, “improving the odds for kids," captures the purpose of our mission “to improve the lives of children and families." We seek to ensure that our most vulnerable children and families are provided with the skills and supports necessary to become resilient, healthy, contributing citizens. To this end, we currently offer a continuum of quality programs addressing child welfare, adoption, independent living, mental health, case management and juvenile justice. All programs and administrative functions are accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA).

Notes from the nonprofit

Daniel Memorial, founded in 1884, is the oldest child-serving agency in Florida. Our 135-year legacy is a rich history of addressing the needs of the most vulnerable children and adults in northeast Florida. We seek to ensure that our families are provided with the skills and supports necessary to become resilient, healthy, contributing, citizens. To this end, we currently provide a continuum of trauma-informed programs including mental health treatment, foster care and homeless services. Our strategic approach to maintain our reputation as an industry leader is multi-faceted, with a focus on professional development of our dedicated team, our most important asset, and continuous improvement and growth of our comprehensive array of services.

Ruling year info

1992

President/CEO

Ms. Lesley Ann Wells

Main address

4203 Southpoint Boulevard

Jacksonville, FL 32216 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-3067752

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Daniel Memorial, founded in 1884, is the oldest child-serving agency in Florida. The organization, a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, has developed an impeccable reputation as a provider of high quality services including community-based and residential mental health, foster care/adoption, therapeutic foster care, independent living, comprehensive mental health assessment, specialized elementary education and juvenile justice mental health services. We seek to ensure that our most vulnerable children and families are provided with the skills and supports necessary to become resilient, healthy, contributing citizens.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Residential Mental Health Treatment

The Statewide In-Patient Psychiatric program (SIPP) is an intensive residential treatment program for children exhibiting symptoms of severe mental health disorders. A team consisting of a psychiatrist, licensed therapist, behaviorist, nurse, and recreation specialist provide comprehensive mental health services including individual, group, and family counseling, and psychiatric care. Children work with professionals to improve their behaviors, interpersonal relationships and family functioning. The goal is to reduce the risk of subsequent acute care and to help kids function effectively in less restrictive environments.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The community mental health system of care serves children and youth who have been diagnosed with mental health disorders. The symptoms of these disorders have lead to negative, anti-social behaviors that severely impact their abilities to thrive in school, among their peers, and at home. All services are “community-based,” including home and school-based family and individual therapy, targeted case management, psychiatric services, and medication management. For over 25 years, this model has been a critical asset to the community by keeping children and adolescents in their homes and schools in lieu of costly residential treatment.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Since 1987, the agency has operated a comprehensive program for homeless teens and young adults (ages 16-21) in northeast Florida. The Project Prepare (under 18) and Project Launch programs (young adults) provide transitional residence, case management, life skills instruction, and counseling. Each year, with on-going, long-term funding from the City of Jacksonville, United Way, and private foundation grants, the program serves a minimum of 75 teens and young adults. The program provides a safe and supportive environment where they can learn life skills, establish life goals, pursue educational opportunities, participate in the workforce, and fully integrate into society.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Since 2003, the agency has provided foster care services, including intensive, home-based prevention services, legal guardianship of children in care, and facilitation of foster child adoptions. The foster care prevention program is designed to prevent children from being separated from their parents through intensive home/family based intervention and parenting coursework.

The agency is also home to the largest therapeutic foster care program in the State of Florida. The program is a critical service that helps to ensure that foster children with mental health disabilities are placed in nurturing homes with highly trained foster parents. These placements require at least one stay-at-home parent and no more than two children in the home.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Daniel Memorial is as the long-time operator of the Florida Adoption Information Center. The agency has provided pertinent adoption information for over 200,000 citizens over a 22-year period. The call center is accessible as the primary statewide contact point for inquiries through the 1-800-96-ADOPT phone number and www.adoptflorida.com. In 2015, the agency also began operations as the statewide information for independent living services for adolescents transitioning into adulthood while in the foster care system.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

Daniel Memorial Institute is the premier provider of independent living educational materials and the facilitator of independent living, foster care, and adoption conferences. For over 29 years, the Daniel Memorial Institute has conducted the annual national independent living conference with an average attendance of over 600 youth and adults. The Institute also develops and distributes training materials to assist youth workers in helping young people obtain the skills necessary to transition successfully to adulthood. The Institute “Independent Living Skills (ILS)” system is sold throughout the United States and Canada. Additionally, Daniel is a founding agency and site of the executive offices of the National Independent Living Association.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children receiving mental health, foster care, juvenile delinquency and/or homeless services.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community-Based Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

All goals are program-specific and individualized for each client with the common theme of ensuring that our most vulnerable children are provided with the skills to grow and thrive within their respective communities.

The strategies for accomplishing agency-wide and program specific goals are dynamic, with the core strategies listed below:

1. Ensure that the most talented, nurturing staff are selected to work with our youth. This strategy is enhanced through efforts to make Daniel an "employer of choice" through a competitive salary and benefits package and a supportive working environment.
2. Ensure that all staff have the tools needed to perform their very important work with children, including ample opportunity for professional development.
3. Work closely with funding entities to ensure compliance with all contractual agreements.
4. Maintain a safe and nurturing environment through comprehensive facility policies and on-going staff training.
5. Continuously collect, aggregate and analyze outcome and utilization data for the purpose of measuring effectiveness and relevance.

The agency has over 130 years experience providing high quality services in northeast Florida. With a dedicated staff of 335, the agency serves 3500 children and adults each year. Financial audits completed each year reveal sound, prudent accounting practices. Annual program-specific audits conducted by the respective funding entities consistently indicate above average program operations and effectiveness. Funders include Florida Medicaid, Florida Department of Children and Families, the City of Jacksonville, and United Way. All programs and administrative functions are accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA).

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Daniel Memorial, founded in 1884, is the oldest child and family-serving agency in Florida. The agency serves children and adults of all ages, races, genders, and disability status. The agency motto, “improving the odds for kids,” captures the purpose of our mission “to improve the lives of children and families." We seek to ensure that our families are provided with the skills and supports necessary to become resilient, healthy, contributing citizens.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The agency conducts paper and electronic surveys of constituents twice annually. During the previous period, many caregivers and adult clients expressed Covid-19 safety concerns. The response was to provide Zoom meetings for case management and mental health treatment services for all key community-based programs to ensure continuity of quality services.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Daniel Memorial, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Daniel Memorial, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Lewis Hunter

Hunter and Associations, CPA

Term: 2020 - 2021

Kirby Griffin

Retired

Lewis Hunter, Jr.

Hunter and Associates

Jackie Cook

David Ashley

Strobl Company, LLC

Shepherd Colledge

Betsy Cox

Rogers Towers

Anthony Giovannetti

Fidelity National Information Services

Susan Reece

Availity

Jay Rolfe

Wells Fargo Bank

Philip Buhler

Moseley, Prichard, Parrish, Knight and Jones

Jaime Calzada

Retired

Timothy Corrigan

United States Justice Department

Brian Coughlin

Bedell Firm

Clarence Houston

McQuire Woods, LLP

Dan Jackson

Center State Bank

James Peavey

The Griggs Group, CPAs

Tea Stephens

Little Black Bag Medical, Inc.

David Winslow

Red Hat, Inc.

Matt England

Coastal Construction Products

Jim Thompson

Regency Centers

Jeanine Fickling

Fickling Construction

Barry Hall

GEM Products

Matthew Robertson, M.D.

Mayo Clinic

Paula Wright

Duval County School Board

Christine Sweet

Attorney, Bunster, Yoakley and Stewart

Jennifer Emerson

Citi

Susan Bateh

Attorney, Florida Blue

Tracey Brown

Enterprise Integration

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.