The Hope for Families Center, Inc.

Changing Lives One Family at a Time

aka HFC   |   Vero Beach, FL   |  www.hopeforfamiliescenter.org

Mission

To transition families from homelessness to sustainable permanent housing by providing safe shelter, food, employment and other supportive services

Ruling year info

1992

Principal Officer

Ms. Margaret Mercado

Main address

715 4th Place

Vero Beach, FL 32962 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Homeless Family Center

EIN

59-3129752

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Single Organization Support (P11)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Hope for Families Center is working to address the problem of family homelessness along the Treasure Coast. Point in Time data report for 2020 indicates that in three counties along the Treasure Coast, 1021 adults were homeless and 358 children. By providing safe, clean shelter, food and access to support services, The Hope for Families Center seeks to reduce the number of homeless families along the Treasure Coast and assist families to gain access to permanent housing and self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Shelter

Emergency Housing for up to 90 days, with two 90 day extension based upon progress toward goals and need.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

In accordance with the McKinney -Vento Act of 1987, HFC identifies areas of needs and is instrumental in assisting with placement in schools. We monitor progress in school and make arrangements for additional support if required.

Additionally, HFC facilitates participation in
extra curricular activities

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Hope for Families Center, serving up to 21 homeless families with children under 18 for 27 years, is the largest shelter in Indian River County. We focus on a program that is designed to provide families with the first step out of homelessness through a participatory service model based on the "hand up" concept of social services. Motivated parents must pass background and drug/alcohol tests and provide mandatory documentation for their children. Each family is assigned a 100 sq. ft. room and share bathing, laundry, dining and family room. We provide a clean, safe place to live with 3 meals a day. Case managers assist parents to find employment, develop a budget, save money, move into permanent housing and enroll children in school, after school/school break enrichment activities or daycare. On average, 64% of residents are children. We follow all who successfully move into housing for 6 months. In 2017-18, 83 heads of household were employed. Sixty-two percent of families successfully moved into permanent housing and 236 children were enrolled in school or daycare. The average stay for a family is 90 days. Up to two 90-day extensions can be provided for each family based on individual evaluation. Program staff meets on a weekly basis to review each family's case to ensure that progress is made toward financial stability goals and to provide holistic case management that navigates families to services in the community to stabilize their lives.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

The Hope for Families Center, serving up to 21 homeless families with children under 18 for 27 years, is the largest shelter in Indian River County. We focus on a program that is designed to provide families with the first step out of homelessness through a participatory service model based on the "hand up" concept of social services. Motivated parents must pass background and drug/alcohol tests and provide mandatory documentation for their children. Each family is assigned a 100 sq. ft. room and share bathing, laundry, dining and family room. We provide a clean, safe place to live with 3 meals a day. Case managers assist parents to find employment, develop a budget, save money, move into permanent housing and enroll children in school, after school/school break enrichment activities or daycare. On average, 64% of residents are children. We follow all who successfully move into housing for 6 months. In 2017-18, 83 heads of household were employed. Sixty-two percent of families successfully moved into permanent housing and 236 children were enrolled in school or daycare. The average stay for a family is 90 days. Up to two 90-day extensions can be provided for each family based on individual evaluation. Program staff meets on a weekly basis to review each family's case to ensure that progress is made toward financial stability goals and to provide holistic case management that navigates families to services in the community to stabilize their lives.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

Where we work

Awards

Agency Excellence Award 2009

United Way of Indian River County

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

The Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These metrics represent the number of adults, or heads of household, who became employed while at the shelter during fiscal year.

Number of children and youth who have received access to stable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of children moved into permanent housing during FY19-20 reflects reduced number of families served during Covid shelter in place requirements.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

HFC serves 3 meals per day 365 days per year for an average of 73 residents during the 2016 year.

Number of program participants who obtain a job within 3 months of program completion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

91% of unemployed adults who entered program exited the program as employed

Number of families who save enough income for two months rent

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

FY19-20 shows a reduction because of the loss of jobs during the Covid crisis.

Number of families who complete and maintain a personal budget

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

FY19-20 reflects 73% of families that developed a working budget. Reduced number of families served because of the Covid shelter in place.

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

62 families moved into permanent housing representing 72% of families served in FY 2019-20. After learning more about managing Covid HFC increased the intake of new clients and have been successful

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

HFC offers three meals a day 365 days per year. Due to COVID we reduced number of families at the shelter in 2020 but have gradually opened up more rooms to take in more clients

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of The Hope for Families Center is to reduce the number of families who are homeless in the counties of Indian River, St. Lucie and Martin. By assisting clients to secure employment and putting money into savings, the goal is to help homeless families secure permanent housing as quickly as possible.

Clients attend classes provided by Career Source, which assist them in resume writing and securing employment. Residents are connected with other outside community partner agencies to assist them in job skill development, health needs, and other services based on individual need. Case managers assist clients with financial goal development as well as creating and maintaining a workable budget. Once employed, clients open a savings account and put away 75% of their net income. When they have at least three months of stable employment and have saved two months rent, they are connected with the Treasure Coast Homeless Services Council in order to secure permanent housing.

Our organization is staffed with qualified case management personnel who monitor each family's progress toward goal attainment. Resident support staff are available 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.

In our 2019 - 2020 fiscal year, The Hope for Families Center housed 302 residents. Ninety - six were adults, and 203 were children. Seventy-nine percent came from Indian River County, 18% from St. Lucie County and 3% from Martin County.

83% of clients secured employment
80% of clients opened savings accounts
73% completed financial literacy and created a working budget
72% built up enough savings to secure permanent housing

The goal for 2020 - 2021 is to increase numbers for clients who adhere to their budget and build up enough savings to get them back on their feet

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

The Hope for Families Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Hope for Families Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/4/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr WILLIAM COONEY

Pro Sports

Term: 2015 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Charles Cunningham

William COONEY

Orthopedic Surgeon, Pro Sports

BRUCE ALBRO

Charles Cunningham

KEVIN MADDEN

William Schmitt

George Collins

Vero Law

Richard Tompkins

Mayo Clinic

Dorothy Reiser

David Johnson

Northern Trust

Ralph Turner

Cleveland Clinic

Melissa Weaver

Northern Trust

Sandra Divine

Divine's Animal Hospital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/18/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/22/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.