HOPE FOR HAITI INC

Naples, FL   |  http://www.hopeforhaiti.com

Mission

Hope for Haiti's mission is to improve the quality of life for the Haitian people, particularly children.

Notes from the nonprofit

Financial: The Board of Directors anticipated the organization operating at a loss in FY13 as Hope for Haiti completed its 3-year plan post-Earthquake. These funds are Board designated specified to continue and strengthen programs that the organization took on after the 2010 tragedy.

For an audited financial statement and the IRS Form 990, please visit www.hopeforhaiti.com

Ruling year info

1999

CEO

Mr. Skyler Badenoch

Main address

1021 5th Ave North

Naples, FL 34102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-3564329

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Poverty reduction in southern Haiti through a sustainable communities model

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education Program

Education is the cornerstone of our connecting strategy and our legacy. In 1989, JoAnne Kuehner, Hope for Haiti Founder, first visited Haiti while volunteering on an emergency airlift mission organized by AmeriCares. The poverty of the country had an immediate and lifetime impact on JoAnne. So much so, that she was determined to do what she could to help the Haitian people move out of destitute poverty. JoAnne deeply believed that the only way to do that was through education. Hope for Haiti was thus founded with education being the foundation for all of the organization’s programs and initiatives, with a particular focus on the Haitian children.
Centering our involvement on connecting children and adults with Education is critical to developing lasting sustainability. We believe the pinnacle of connection with the greatest leverage of impact through supporting educational professionals with the tools, training and resources they need to be successful. By supporting 24 partner schools in the greater south of Haiti with teacher salary subsidies and support for specific community or classroom needs (i.e. construction, school materials, benches/blackboards, teacher training, first aid supplies, clean water, etc.), Hope for Haiti is impacting 300 teachers and over 6,000 students each year.

Objective: To provide the children of Haiti with access to a quality education.

Although the Haitian Constitution explicitly states "...education shall be free. Primary education shall be compulsory. State education shall be free at every level,” the reality of the Haitian education system is far from what the 2013 Millennium Development Goals mandated of all participating countries. According the World Bank, 50% of children do not attend school, and 80% of those who do attend private schools - public schools can accommodate less than 10 percent of the school age population. Without qualified teachers or adequate textbooks, the quality of education is generally poor. This has resulted in poor test scores, grade repetition and high dropout rates.
A 2004 World Bank household vulnerability study determined that in addition to initial enrollment and quality-related problems, families often pulled children out of school in the face of economic distress. As a result, kids end up cycling in and out of school with the result that today, three-fourths of children in primary school are on average two years too old for their grade level.
Hope for Haiti made the decision to partner with community and religious private schools in order to increase access to education. By providing necessary assistance to private schools, Hope for Haiti can help to increase student enrollment as well as the overall quality of education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Haiti’s current healthcare system is insufficient to meet even the minimum medical needs of its people. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) states that only 60% of Haiti’s population has some form of access to healthcare, whereas the other 40% rely on traditional medicine in the rural areas. Limited access and poor quality in the Haitian healthcare sector cause significant delays in the country’s development. A lack of medical treatment or medications can keep men and women from working and children from going to school. Keeping the Haitian people healthy is critical to the overall development of their country.
Although Hope for Haiti began with a focus in education, in 1997, Founder JoAnne Kuehner joined forces with Dr. Keith Hussey, a gastroenterologist, to incorporate healthcare and nutrition into the organization’s mission. Hope for Haiti quickly discovered that providing this additional support is absolutely critical to promoting educational success. During its work in the area of education, the organization found that clinics and medical facilities were available, but that their capacities were severely limited by a lack of materials, medications, and well-paid staff. In response, we began procuring the items that these local facilities needed and transporting them to Haiti where they could be used to benefit the poorest of the poor. Since 2008, the organization’s Healthcare Program has expanded drastically, primarily thanks to the opening of Hope for Haiti’s Infirmary St. Etienne, a Haitian-staffed outpatient primary healthcare center and pharmacy in downtown Les Cayes. The Infirmary now hosts full-time three doctors, a dentist and dental assistant, nine nurses, a laboratory technician, an electronic medical records data officer, and two administrators. It specializes in low-cost quality primary care for approximately 12,000 patients annually, many of whom are seen regularly for chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. With a dedicated Haitian medical team and a reputation for quality primary care in the South, the organization has been able to lessen its need for outside medical mission trips and now proactively requests training from key National and International specialists when needed.
Hope for Haiti touches the lives of over 500,000 people by providing financial and medical support to over 20 healthcare and nutrition centers. The objective is to improve the overall health of partner communities with the patient at the center of this process in a three-pronged strategy: 1) Prevention and Outreach- Distributing medications and supplies to rural partner facilities throughout the South and providing school-based public health outreach to students and their communities. 2) Treatment & Follow-up Care- Providing patients with low-cost quality primary, laboratory, dental, surgical, and wound care at our Infirmary St. Etienne. 3) Capacity Building- Organizing opportunities for Haitian medical professionals to receive advanced medical training.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

For many places around the world, water is often the center of the community. People come to wash their clothes, drink, bathe, water their animals, cook and so on. Hope for Haiti’s clean water program started in 2007 after witnessing several challenges Haitians faced when it came to clean water: access, quality and consistency. We now have UV purification systems and wells located in 15 strategic locations including our Infirmary St. Etienne, other community schools and healthcare clinics, and an orphanage. Along with safe and great tasting water, this program provides critical education on the importance of using clean water and how the water systems work. Our clean water technician has trained one community member on monitoring and maintenance of the system.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Investments in lasting Infrastructure improvements remove barriers to progress and catapult a community’s potential forward. In addition, through careful planning and emergency response, we can ensure that these families have the tools they need in the wake of a disaster. Every community needs to invest in infrastructure, but in low-resources settings like rural communities in Haiti, a relatively small investment in the construction of a school building, solar power, or basic materials can make all the difference.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Bolstering the local Economy by increasing access to credit, making connection to markets, supporting business training and marketing, and injecting resources into identified businesses and opportunities, fuels the communities we serve to become self-reliant, self-sufficient and self-made success stories.
By investing in community Infrastructure and Economy, we Empower our partners to reduce their reliance upon Hope for Haiti and increase reliance upon themselves. Self-reliance is the ultimate objective of true sustainability and the goal of our empowerment strategy, which seeks to strategically and significantly reduce community program distributions/financial support over a 10- year time horizon to foster the creation of Connected, Healed and Empowered Sustainable Communities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2013

Charity Navigator 2012

Charity Navigator 2011

Charity Navigator 2010

Charity Navigator 2009

Charity Navigator 2008

Charity Navigator 2007

Charity Navigator 2006

Charity Navigator 2014

Charity Navigator 2015

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2016

Charity Navigator 2016

Charity Navigator 2018

Charity Navigator 2019

Charity Navigator 2020

Awards

REAL Award 2014

Save the Children

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Related Program

Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of students enrolled at our school partners. Number of partner schools decreased from 40 to 24 during FY14.

Number of gallons of water filtered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Water

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Gallon tracking meters were installed in May 2011.

Number of teachers provided with subsidized salary

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Related Program

Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2016: A total of $222,000.00 in salary support was distributed to primary and secondary school teachers at our 24 partner schools. Number of partner schools decreased from 40 to 24 during FY14.

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Healthcare Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Visits increased in FY2013 post-Hurricane Sandy. FY2010 numbers do not reflect disaster relief efforts after the earthquake.

Number of students provided with health education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Healthcare Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students provided with school lunches

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Academics, Adults

Related Program

Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of Haitians provided with employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Economy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Employment through our office staff, clinic staff, farmers and day laborers.

Number of computer labs installed & maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Related Program

Infrastructure

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2016: 15 labs (563 computers).

Number of seedlings grown in school gardens (reforestation)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Economy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patients treated at mobile clinics

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Seniors

Related Program

Healthcare Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With experience running poverty alleviation programs in Haiti since 1989, Hope for Haiti has emerged as one of the most trusted non-profit organizations working to improve the quality of life for the Haitian people, particularly children, in southern Haiti. The organization’s team and network of partners provide people with better access to education, healthcare, water, and economic development opportunities. Through Hope for Haiti's partnerships, the organization aims to create sustainable communities that catalyze generational and transformative change in the Greater South of Haiti. Hope for Haiti has a rich legacy of impact beginning with JoAnne Kuehner's first visit to Haiti in 1989. JoAnne launched Hope for Haiti on the program foundations of Education and Healthcare, with a specific focus on children.

Hope for Haiti is working in long-term partnerships with local communities to initiate sustainable development. With the school at the center of the community, Hope for Haiti designs, implements, monitors, and evaluates initiatives in response to identified needs. Hope for Haiti is now positioning itself with a vision to create lasting sustainability within the communities it serves, centered on a 5 Core Area model. The model Connects through Education, Heals through Healthcare and Water, and Empowers through Infrastructure and Economy.

To increase the sustainability of our school-based program, Hope for Haiti has partnered with Yunus Social Business Haiti S.A. This partnership has already provided micro-credit to local residents, facilitated community dialogue, and trained local leaders on finance and administration. Over the long-term, we aim to promote and develop social business in Southern Haiti – a replicable model to solve problems created by poverty and increase a community's capacity to generate income which can then be invested in the education and health of the community.

Hope for Haiti has been operating solely in Haiti for 30 years. With a board of directors committed to good governance and fiscal responsibility, the organization maintains a low overhead (less than 5%) and ensures that over 95 cents of every dollar donated goes directly to our programs on the ground. In addition, our organization has built up a strong dedicated team of over forty professionals working in Haiti and eight in the United States to create transformational change for the next generation.

Hope for Haiti hasn't yet been fully successful in empowering school communities with economic opportunities to be able to pay their school fees at 100%. This is the ultimate goal of the organization: to empower our school communities through job opportunities and ultimately allow Hope for Haiti to decrease educational subsidies to schools, so that we can focus on impacting even more people!.

By committing to long-term, sustainable development in partnership with these communities, Hope for Haiti is committed to achieving results towards our vision of eliminating extreme poverty.

Hope for Haiti continues to be limited by resources and donor commitments. Hope for Haiti can only focus on long-term measurements of progress when multi-year funding can accompany the sustainable development program. Hope for Haiti encourages donors at all levels to make long-term commitments (5 year increments) to programs so that short and long-term indicators can be tracked and strategic development planning can take place to make each philanthropic investment the most impactful. This type of commitment by the donor, Hope for Haiti, and the program beneficiaries, has proven successful in providing lasting solutions.

Financials

HOPE FOR HAITI INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HOPE FOR HAITI INC

Board of directors
as of 12/9/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tiffany Kuehner

Hope for Haiti

Term: 2016 -

Tiffany Kuehner

Catholic Relief Services

JoAnne Kuehner

Hope for Haiti

Jim Lancaster, Jr.

ALAD

Vladimir J. Mathieu, MD

Naples Medical Center

Brian Childs, DDS

Private Dental Practice

Dee Dee Nye

Former Corporate Executive

Kevin Ashley

Dalio Foundation, Inc.

Greg Hunter, CFP

PNC Wealth Management

Laura Mitchell

The Bob & Renee Parsons Foundation

Michael Gay

GDG Beton et Construction, S.A.

Melissa Dunwell Padberg

Papyrus, SA

The Honorable Mary Sommer

Connecticut Superior Court Judge

Brad Galbraith

Woods, Weidenmiller, Michetti, Rudnick & Galbraith, PLLC

Josh Lippert

Core Property Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/09/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data