PLATINUM2023

Parker Street Ministries, Inc.

The WORD became Flesh and Moved into the Neighborhood.

aka Parker Street Ministries   |   Lakeland, FL   |  https://psmlakeland.org/

Mission

To participate in the vision of God’s love, Parker Street Ministries is committed to Gospel-centered community development beginning in Lakeland’s Parker Street neighborhood through the focus areas of: Fostering Spiritual Growth so Christ and His Gospel are front and center, Supporting Lifetime Learners through educational opportunities, Stabilizing the Neighborhood by addressing the quality and availability of housing, and Cultivating Connections so gaps in relationships and services are bridged.

Ruling year info

2000

Chief Executive Officer

Timothy Mitchell

Main address

719 N Massachusetts Ave

Lakeland, FL 33801 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-3579886

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Christian (X20)

Neighborhood Center, Settlement House (P28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The participants are offered opportunities for movement from generational to situational poverty and beyond through programs and side-by-side ministry. Most participants struggle under the bonds of generational poverty and its accompanying woes. We passionately believe Christian community development is vital to neighborhoods and cities. Without our efforts and collaborations with other organizations, the crime characteristic of at-risk neighborhoods proliferates, significant learning gaps develop in students, the Digital Divide widens, substandard housing continues, and the effects of isolation, with its corresponding hopelessness, are left unaddressed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lifetime Learning


The Academic Enrichment Program (AEP) identifies and narrows learning gaps in around 100 K-12 children/youth residing in an under-resourced neighborhood by offering each child 800+ hours of year-round support addressing relational, academic, spiritual, social, and physical needs in a safe environment. Standardized testing upon entrance and at year-end and access to student academic reports allow for individualized reading and math focus. Students enjoy enrichment activities, field trips, healthy foods, and transportation to and from AEP. Partnerships with parents, teachers, classroom leaders, community organizations, and volunteers are facilitated. The after-school program for students in K-8 is delivered at no charge. Summer Camp for grades K-8 is delivered at a nominal charge of $10 per week. The high school program occurs on school day afternoons and provides homework help, leadership opportunities, enrichments, financial capability, and career exploration.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The annual Christmas Store helps neighborhood residents provide for their own children in a developmental way. Staff and volunteers create a fully-functioning store exclusively for the neighborhood with hundreds of brand new donated items priced 75% off their retail value. In 2022, 1,848 gifts were sold to benefit 231 children from more than 77 households. Ninety-seven children also shopped for their families in a separate store, purchasing 485 gifts. In addition, 386 volunteers made it happen, filling hundreds of slots, totaling 1,015 volunteer hours of labor providing marketing, toy collection, registration, set-up, pricing, assistant shoppers, checkout, and wrapping.

Population(s) Served
Families

The housing initiative utilizes volunteers and partnerships with landlords, residents, and outside agencies to work towards stabilizing neighborhood families and beautifying the blighted neighborhood. Volunteers and partnerships with local police help bring community development by the model of Crime Prevention Through Environment Design (CPTED). As we drive around the neighborhood and interact with households, needed home improvements are quickly identified and resources—whether from other nonprofits, volunteers, or the City of Lakeland—are pursued. These activities reflect our desire to make our neighborhood a beautiful, desirable place to live both for homeowners and renters.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Neighborhood gatherings build a sense of community in this marginalized neighborhood. We partner with volunteers from inside and outside the neighborhood to host an annual Easter Celebration, National Night Out, Christmas Store, Fall Festival, Summer Splash, and more. About 100 residents attended each event in 2022. They enjoyed activities and food in a casual, safe environment. In 2022, 1,510 hours were logged by 414 volunteers at neighborhood gatherings. Additionally, our facility is used by outside groups to provide educational/enrichment opportunities for residents of the neighborhood. Health is integrated into the Academic Enrichment Program curriculum. In 2022, more than 16,000 healthy snacks or meals were served through Parker Street Ministries. Program delivery, particularly for the Academic Enrichment Program, utilizes trauma-informed practices.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Throughout the year, all students in the after-school Academic Enrichment Program and Summer Camp receive multiple sessions of quality financial fitness instruction in a small group setting. In addition, a Future Workforce Summer Program teaching soft job skills and providing real work opportunities, leadership development, and financial capability practices is offered annually. Micro-interns receive the same mentoring. Outcomes for this program include an emergency savings plan, completed resume, interview experience, next goals for education, financial account monitoring, and career next steps.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people served through academic enrichment program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lifetime Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number in households receiving childcare, education advocacy, and number of children in program. This number fluctuates due to housing and size of families.

Number of hours of academic enrichment support offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lifetime Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The program provides academic and enriching activities on most school days and an 8-week, six-hour-per-day Summer Camp. 2020 reflected an increase to accommodate eLearners during the pandemic.

Number of students receiving homework help

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lifetime Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is a point-in-time measure that takes place by September 30 at the beginning of each school year. It fluctuates throughout the year as students move in and out of the neighborhood.

Number of people served through Neighborhood Christmas Store

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Neighborhood Christmas Store

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Impact measures shifted in 2018. 2022 numbers do not reflect additional persons impacted through the donation of excess toys to local nonprofits to round out their holiday ministries.

Number of clients who volunteer

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A desired outcome is that clients grow to serve clients. Volunteering is a pathway to generosity, dignity, normalization, and leadership. It is not a requirement. COVID-19 impacted the 2020 number.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reflects unduplicated volunteers. Pandemic severely limited number in 2020. Shifting metrics to measure repeat volunteers. Goal is to develop current volunteers over seeking one-time volunteers.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Parker Street Ministries’ ultimate goal is Gospel-centered community development beginning in Lakeland’s Parker Street community. We passionately believe Christian community development work is vital to our neighborhoods, our cities, and our nation. Without our efforts and partnerships with other organizations, the crime characteristic of at-risk neighborhoods proliferates, significant education and income gaps persist, substandard housing continues, and the effects of isolation, with its corresponding hopelessness and depression, remain unaddressed.

We serve an impoverished, high crime area with more than 1,049 households (this includes the Parker Street and North Lake Wire neighborhoods), just north of downtown Lakeland, FL. Replication is part of our mission. As successful programs develop, the goal is to help other agencies repeat them in similar areas. The Parker Street neighborhood is our focus but also a beginning. We are excited to be able to have our CEO coaching young, similar ministries in Atlanta and Rome, GA; Orlando, FL; and Montgomery, AL.

Because of decades of brokenness, meaningful change will be a generational process. This means our work is slow and plodding. At the same time, our strategies move us toward both long and short-term goals.

We have a long-term vision for residents to be:
-influential lifetime learners who reach their full potential
-living in a mixed-income neighborhood containing exceptional businesses and housing
-financially healthy stewards and generous through dependence on God
-pursuing healthy community as all people are created in God’s image

The goals for this vision of generational revitalization are touch points for meaningful change in education, housing, finances, and health. Our strategies are informed by a 6-year plan for improvement in these areas.

Parker Street Ministries’ strategies (2017-2022) were developed by core staff who provided needs assessments based on community listening, observations from living and working in the neighborhood, client demographics, and big data.

Lifetime Learning - Goal 1: Parker Street residents are influential lifetime learners who reach their full potential.
1. Provide academic support for students, pre-K through young adult
2. Provide learning opportunities for all ages for a variety of topics and purposes
3. Enhance indigenous leadership to share skills in all areas of learning
4. Cultivate partnerships with outside agencies and volunteers to improve learning

Desirable Neighborhood - Goal 2: The Parker Street neighborhood is a mixed-income neighborhood containing exceptional businesses and housing.
1. Set an example of and advocate for standards for neighborhood
2. Partner with outside agencies and residents to increase number of owner-occupied homes
3. Partner with landlords, residents, outside agencies for highest quality rental experience
4. Implement projects that utilize volunteers/organizations to work with residents to build community and beautify neighborhood

Financial Capability - Goal 3: Parker Street residents are financially healthy stewards and generous through dependence on God.
1. Offer jobs preparedness activities or programs for all ages
2. Provide access to professional money management instruction or resources that serve all ages and includes budgeting, record keeping, financial transactions, resource building, debt reduction, and credit repair
3. Encourage sacrifices of resources, time, and energy for others

Healthy Community - Goal 4: Parker Street residents are pursuing healthy community as all people who are created in God’s image.
1. Encourage a life of listening, learning, and reconciliation where diverse people are valued and intentionally engaged in authentic relationships
2. Develop and implement leadership among diverse people. Encourage a joyful love for God through constant practice of the ordinary means of God’s grace: prayer, the Bible, and the sacraments
3. Demonstrate and share Godly examples and biblical principles of family life. Promote healthy living
4. Identify and combat the internal and external forces that contribute to poverty

Near Term Activities Relating to Strategies:
-Provide college experiences and soft job skills training for high school students
-Focus on new technology in narrowing digital divide
-Teach reconciliation principles from "The Young Peacemaker"
-Launch multi-pronged strategies for increasing number of three-bedroom rentals available to AEP families
-Engage neighborhood residents with volunteer opportunities
-Increase number of community partnerships
-Collaborate with local police and others to reduce neighborhood criminal activity
-Establish financial literacy milestones for grades K-12
-Continued checks on feasibility of expanding service area into adjacent neighborhood

Parker Street Ministries’ resources, capacities, and connections support progress toward long-term goals. These capabilities are categorized as external, internal, and future resources.

External Resources:
-1,049+ households in neighborhood, population 2,945+
-Diverse financial support through businesses, individuals, churches, foundations, and events
-678 volunteers whose work in 2021 was valued at $122,650
-$1,094,000 projected income (2022)
-City playground on adjacent property
-Community development investments of Community Redevelopment Association such as park, roadway improvements, and commercial corridor
-Collaborations through churches, builders, educators, Florida Prosperity Partnership, agency partners, Lakeland Economic Development Council, Lakeland Regional Health, local police, Neighborhood Association Coalition, local colleges, civic clubs, and other organizations

Internal Resources:
-22,000 sq. ft. facility with Community Center, offices, and a Family Life Center housing 10 classrooms, art room, stage, tech room, and commercial kitchen
-Parking lot and fenced courtyard
-Assets approximately $2,803,538 (Audit 2021)
-Network of 35 computers with Internet access, printers, managed IT
-Highly qualified staff in administration (with degrees in Master of Business Administration - Executive Leadership, communications and public relations, theology, ministerial leadership, English, and education - certified teacher)
-Highly respected and qualified Chief Executive Officer
-Four senior staff/board families living in the neighborhood served
-Bi-lingual capabilities of staff
-Contact lists for donors, volunteers, residents
-Board of Trustees with diverse skills (nonprofit accounting, financial management, higher education, government, community development, risk, banking, finance, fundraising, public relations, and clergy)
-Supportive Advisory Committee made up of community leaders
-Prayers of Christians
-Refreshed website and social media such as Facebook and Instagram
-FREE SurfLakeland Wi-Fi available campus-wide and beyond
-Governance processes in place to allow for continual improvement
-Constituent relationship management software (DonorPerfect)

Future Resources and Strengthening Tools:
-Continual development of Board of Trustees
-Increased diversity in funding through annual fundraiser and micro-events
-Increased collaborations with local entities
-Enhanced volunteer management
-Indigenous volunteers as a leadership development tool
-Further development of social media

Parker Street Ministries continues to make progress toward our long-term goals. In 2012 we completed a $1.4 million facility purchase/renovation. We remain in a capacity building phase for programs. Other recent progress includes:

-Expanded year-round academic enrichment program from grades K-8 to K-12
-Added career and financial planning for high school students
-Established year-round tutoring room for all K-5 students
-Continued with interns from neighborhood
-Provided volunteers with meaningful community service hours and job skills
-Special funding provided kick start for financial fitness program in 2015 and was renewed in January 2019
-Addition of Digital Literacy Curriculum in 2018 to combat Digital Divide

The problems that we are facing in our neighborhood are bigger than us, and we have been blessed with an invaluable asset in our collaborations with so many different entities. From other nonprofits trying to tackle similar issues in their neighborhoods to relationships with businesses and even our city, we have both enriched our programs and our capacity to grow well into the future. We are undergoing a long-range planning process to look at the next five years. In evaluating the current plan, certain objectives have been met, others are ongoing, and the remaining objectives must be modified. It is important for staff and stakeholders to discuss the impact and effectiveness of the current plan and develop an updated plan for the 2023-2027 period.

One big risk is being unable to fund our vision. We cannot control the economy or donors. We can only communicate our vision to donors and ask them to join in the transformation of this neighborhood through giving, volunteering, and prayer.

How do we adjust along the way? We are nimble enough to quickly evaluate problem areas and make changes. This was proven in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the neighborhood. Within two weeks we changed our model but remained open for kids whose parents could not care for them in the day. This included serving at-risk virtual learners and our regular after-school program students. In addition, we implemented outdoor classrooms and increased collaborations with organizations providing food. To combat the COVID-slide-in-learning, we began—and have continued—offering daily tutoring for all K-5 students in addition to any student at-risk of falling behind.

This is just one example of how we adjusted our strategies to provide Gospel-centered community development beginning in Lakeland’s Parker Street neighborhood.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Parker Street Ministries, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Parker Street Ministries, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Teresa Bray

Back Office Consultants

Term: 2022 - 2023

Teresa Bray

Back Office Consultants

Randy Matthews, MBA

Retired, Community Development

Joe Whitehurst

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Monty Davis, M. Div.

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Scott MacDonald

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Lance Schmidt, CPA, CFE

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Marc Presnell, DVM

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Terri Presnell

Community Leader

Kay Cochran, MBA

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Sandra Thiele

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/11/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data