JESSIE BALL DUPONT RELIGIOUS CHARITABLE & EDUCATIONAL FUND

aka Jessie Ball duPont Fund   |   Jacksonville, FL   |  http://www.dupontfund.org

Mission

Our mission is to serve the communities that Jessie Ball duPont knew and loved. We envision a world in which every member of those communities feels they belong.‍

Ruling year info

1973

President

Mari Kuraishi

Main address

40 East Adams Street Suite 300

Jacksonville, FL 32202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-6368632

NTEE code info

Private Independent Foundations (T22)

Private Grantmaking Foundations (T20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Per the terms of Jessie Ball duPont’s will, the Fund was established to provide temporary relief to individuals, organizations, and communities in Florida, Virginia, and Delaware. At its heart the Jessie Ball duPont Fund is deeply committed to placemaking and inclusive growth in the communities that were important to Mrs. duPont.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Placemaking: A Sense of Place

Our investments in placemaking are driven by four underlying convictions:

1. Belonging: People’s connections to each other and the places they care about matter a lot, and when successfully nurtured, result in a cohesive community spirit and a sense of belonging.

2. Strengthening: Strengthening low-income neighborhoods while building social capital is critical to belonging. People of color and members of other historically marginalized communities have unique knowledge, power and resources to influence their neighborhoods and communities.

3. Partnering: People’s efforts are maximized when they work in partnership with each other.

4. Leading: People participate in projects and decisions that affect them, and creating opportunities for emerging leaders helps to build individual and organizational capacity for civic engagement.

Population(s) Served
Adults

For Educational Institutions

1. Increasing retention and/or graduation rates of first-generation and low-income students at private and public universities

2. Providing low-income and first-generation youth and their families with practical college access tools that lead to college enrollment

3. Increasing the diversity of board members at private educational institutions, and the diversity of faculty members at all educational institutions

For Nonprofit Organizations

1. Increasing the diversity of board members and staff at nonprofit organizations

2. Assisting organizations in eliminating unconscious bias by conducting internal audits of policies, procedures and practices and supporting the implementation of recommended changes

For Cultural & Religious Institutions

1. Providing opportunities for the artistic works and stories of diverse populations to be shared in traditional art, cultural and historic preservation spaces

2. Supporting programming and other efforts to make traditional arts and culture spaces welcoming to entire communities

3. Utilizing spaces that are unused during the week as gathering spaces that meet a community need

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Impact Investing Program is designed to:

1. Align the Fund’s endowed assets to our mission and values;

2. Catalyze innovative solutions and services that benefit humans and the environment; and

3. Create new sources of investment capital for communities and encourage others to leverage their assets to more directly impact the communities they serve.

As of 2020, about one-third of our endowment is invested in a socially responsible manner or invested to achieve a positive impact, such as the preservation and creation of affordable housing or small business development for women and people of color.

These investment vehicles include program-related investments (PRIs) such as loans and guarantees, and mission-related investments (MRIs) such as equity investments in companies that provide social benefit.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform.

Average Large Grant Amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform. Large grants were over $10,000 in 2015-16 and over $5,000 in 2017-19.

Average Small Grant Amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform. Small grants were $10,000 or less in 2015-16 and $5,000 or less in 2017-19.

Median Large Grant Amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform.

Median Small Grant Amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Information is tracked and exported from the Fund's Fluxx grant making platform.

Organizational Impact on Grantee Organizations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From the 2019 Center for Effective Philanthropy Grantee Perception Report. This data will be collected every three years. In this category, the Fund ranks in the 60th percentile with a 6.25 rating.

Community Impact on Grantee Communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From the 2019 Center for Effective Philanthropy Grantee Perception Report. This data will be collected every three years. In this category, the Fund ranks in the 33rd percentile with a 5.32 rating.

Field Impact on grantee Fields

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From the 2019 Center for Effective Philanthropy Grantee Perception Report. This data will be collected every three years. In this category, the Fund ranks in the 19th percentile with a 5.44 rating.

Strength of Grantee Relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From the 2019 Center for Effective Philanthropy Grantee Perception Report. This data will be collected every three years. In this category, the Fund ranks in the 62nd percentile with a 6.27 rating.

Helpfulness of selection process according to grantees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From the 2019 Center for Effective Philanthropy Grantee Perception Report. This data will be collected every three years. In this category, the Fund ranks in the 99th percentile with a 5.96 rating.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals are to make a measurable difference in identified core communities in Florida, Virginia, and Delaware. There are different goals for each community, guided as much as possible by the priorities identified by constituents of the community. These goals can change over time, through shifts in community preference, and through changes in the external environment. The geographic designations made in Mrs duPont’s will incline us to take a holistic, sector-agnostic approach to the challenges faced by communities, so our approach does not always follow thematic lines.

The Jessie Ball duPont Fund seeks to provide catalytic funding to organizations based in the communities that were important to Mrs duPont in her lifetime. We seek to do this in partnership with key stakeholders in the community so that we can maximize the impact achieved with our resources. We seek to bring all modalities of support to the goals described above, ranging from capital, lending, grants, knowledge, to convenings.

The Jessie Ball duPont Fund has approximately $300 million in assets, of which about a third is invested with an impact lens. Grantmaking has ranged from $5-10 million a year. Because the Fund has made grants to some grantees for over 30 years, we have long-standing relationships with many grantees that give us unique insights into the long-term challenges faced by grantees.

The Jessie Ball duPont Fund has consistently funded some 300+ organizations for over 30 years. The learning from this type of grantmaking is unique and will be leveraged for our strategies going forward. The Fund has also made a landmark commitment to downtown Jacksonville by investing in the city’s old main public library—a mid-century modern architectural gem that was upgraded to LEED standards and provides affordable office space downtown for key nonprofits. The investment was made in 2012 after the 2008 Great Recession (Jacksonville was hit hard by the foreclosure crisis) and was a vote of confidence in downtown as well as in the nonprofits that suddenly faced a spike in demand for their services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

JESSIE BALL DUPONT RELIGIOUS CHARITABLE & EDUCATIONAL FUND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

JESSIE BALL DUPONT RELIGIOUS CHARITABLE & EDUCATIONAL FUND

Board of directors
as of 2/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rev. Eddie E. Jones

Diocese of Florida

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Anna Escobedo Cabral

The Cabral Group

Term: 2021 - 2023

Rev. Eddie Jones, Jr.

Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Florida

Rev. Jen Bailey

Founder and Executive Director of the Faith Matters Network

Marty Lanahan

EVP and Tampa Bay Market President for Iberia Bank

David LLewellyn

Senior Vice President and Senior Fiduciary Officer at Northern Trust

Anna Cabral

Partner in The Cabral Group

Elizabeth Kiss

CEO of the Rhodes Trust and Warden of Rhodes House

Chuck Redmond

Vice President of Finance and Operations at Venture Philanthropy Partners (VPP)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/25/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.