PLATINUM2024

American Printing House for the Blind Inc

An accessible world, with opportunity for everyone.

aka APH   |   Louisville, KY   |  https://www.aph.org

Mission

APH empowers people who are blind or visually impaired by providing accessible and innovative products, materials, and services for lifelong success.

Ruling year info

1935

President

Dr. Craig Meador

Main address

1839 Frankfort Ave

Louisville, KY 40206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

61-0444640

NTEE code info

Blind/Visually Impaired Centers, Services (P86)

Raising & Fund Distribution (Pun)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To ensure that students who are blind or visually impaired have access to educational tools, resources, and services, at the same time and of the same quality as their sighted peers, to ensure equity in the classroom and personal, academic and professional achievement.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational Aids for blind and visually impaired people.

APH manufactures braille, large print, recorded, CD-ROM, and tactile graphic publications, as well as a wide assortment of educational and daily living products. APH also offers a variety of services to assist consumers and professionals in the field of vision, such as Louis, a database listing materials available in accessible media from organizations across North America.

Population(s) Served
Adults

APH provides braille books to students across the USA.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with vision impairments

Where we work

Awards

Access Award 2015

American Foundation for the Blind

FCC CHairman's Award for Advancement in Accessibility 2014

Federal Government

Helen Keller Achievement Award 2020

American Foundation for the Blind

Best of Innovation Award in Accessibility for Code Jumper 2020

CES

Award for Indoor Explorer 2018

American Council of the Blind

Gold Star Award for Exceptional Commitment to Employee Health and Well-Being 2018

Worksite Wellness Council of Louisville

Civic Innovation Award 2018

Louisville Metro Government

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of braille books distributed to blind and visually impaired children and their families

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Braille Books

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These are hybrid print/braille picture books that are distributed to families with children ages 0-6 across the United States through APH's Braille Tales Program.

Number of camps offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In response to COVID, APH began offering virtual summer camps in subjects ranging from STEM, arts, music, mystery, and Spanish-language. In 2021, there were six camps, in 2022 we plan for seven.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since our founding in 1858, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) has aimed to provide people who are blind or visually impaired with access to printed information. Today, APH is the oldest and largest nonprofit organization in the world devoted solely to researching, developing, and manufacturing products for people who are blind or visually impaired. Through innovative access technologies, virtual and in-person initiatives, and educational resources for students, parents, and professionals, we are reaching people of all ages with vision loss.

We strive to make our goals happen with four strategies:

Support the Core: ensuring that students in grades K-12 receive the books and technologies they require to learn on pace with their sighted peers, by finding the financial supports and consistently supporting the needs of our constituents
Build the Brand: expanding our reach and increasing and improving relationships and presence, virtually (web, social media) and through outreach (conferences)
Pursue Targeted Opportunities: developing new products, engaging in new ventures, and publishing new resources
Nurture Partnerships: acquiring new contracts, new partnerships, new donors, new institutional funders

We achieve our goals with products and programs. APH develops and manufactures hundreds of products, tools, and supplies that support students and adults who are visually impaired, helping them to increase their independence.
Examples are:

1. Participated in product training presentations and exhibits at 54 different venues;
2. Provided product loans for 14 university preparation programs
3. Braille instructional programs
4. Talking computer software
5. Low vision assessment kits
6. Early childhood development materials
7. Braille writing devices
8. Product Training and Support
9. Digital recording equipment
10. Videos on topics related to blindness
11. Science teaching kits

The American Printing House for the Blind manufactures textbooks and other educational publications for students who are visually impaired. APH also provides publications useful to adults, such as cookbooks and dictionaries. In addition, APH creates recorded books on a contract basis.

Our programs and initiatives span all age groups and include:

Braille Tales - a free program for children who are blind or visually impaired up to age six, wherein families receive six print/braille hybrid picture books annually
Prison Braille - individuals who are incarcerated are trained in braille transcription for educational opportunities and potential employment upon reentry into society
InSights Art - a program and juried visual arts competition for school children and adults with vision loss
APH Museum - a one-of-a-kind historical record, and celebration of future innovations, for people with vision loss
ConnectCenter - a comprehensive online platform with written content and multi-media, interactive forums for learning
Virtual ExCEL Academy - free webinars for students who are blind, parents, teachers, and professionals serving people who are blind or visually impaired

Although access to information will change, familiar tools like the use of braille and talking books and magazines will remain unchanged. The future of APH will be tied directly to progress in the blindness field and advances in technology. Through research, outreach, and advisory services APH will continue to be a leader in the field helping to promote independence for all. We reach more than 1,000,000 people nationwide through our programs and products, and we continue to grow year over year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

American Printing House for the Blind Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

American Printing House for the Blind Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Phoebe Wood

CompaniesWood

Jane Hardy

Brinly-Hardy Co.

David Holton

David Holton Law

Herbert (Bart) Perkins

Leverage Partners

Phoebe A Wood

CompaniesWood

Craig Meador

American Printing House for the Blind

W. Barrett Nichols

BSG Financial

Russell Shaffer

Walmart

Marje Kaiser

Retired

Angie M Evans

PPL Corporation

Robin Moore

Coca-Cola Company

Yung Nguyen

IVS, LLC

David Nigro

Snell & Wilmer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/29/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.