DREAMS FOR KIDS DC

aka DFKDC   |   Washington, DC   |  http://dreamsforkidsdc.org/

Mission

Dreams For Kids DC provides life-changing activities that empower children with physical and developmental disabilities to unite with their peers and realize their potential.

Notes from the nonprofit

All too often children with disabilities are isolated and don't have adequate opportunities to partake in physical activities that other children are able to experience daily. We differentiate ourselves from our competitors by the quality and abundance of volunteer support we offer. Each of our clinics ensures a 1:1 ratio of volunteer to participant.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Glenda Fu

Main address

1875 K Street NW 4th Floor - WeWork

Washington, DC 20006 USA

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Formerly known as

DREAMS FOR KIDS INC

DREAMS FOR KIDS INC

DREAMS FOR KIDS INC

EIN

61-1716117

NTEE code info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are very few communities and programs that allow children with disabilities to interact with their peers in a comfortable environment where they are not subject to insensitivity. With over 5,132 people with disabilities aged 5 – 17 here in DC; 46,656 in Maryland; and 62,074 in Virginia; it is essential that DFKDC fills the void in their lives and provide opportunities to unite with their peers. DFKDC clinics celebrate all abilities and parents have expressed that their children feel more confident and social after the event. Many of these people have multiple disability types. In the last few years, as there has been greater attention on exercise and health (Michelle Obama's Let's Move! Campaign being one), we recognized the importance of providing activities for children with disabilities not only t

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

DFKDC events/clinics

DFKDC events are adaptive sports clinics held once or twice a month for children with disabilities aged 4 – 24. Through our events, those with physical and developmental disabilities are able to come off the sidelines and unite with their peers. A lot of these children have been bullied in schools, and are left out of activities with able-bodied children. The empowerment and self confidence gained through the clinic will carry over from the field to the home, classroom, and the community, allowing them to realize that their disability will not prevent them from fulfilling their dreams. Each child is partnered with a volunteer to learn the essence of teamwork, have a mentor, and also bond over a sense of camaraderie.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Children and youth

Throughout the year, Dreams For Kids DC provides a wide variety of adaptive clinics for children with physical and developmental disabilities— from waterskiing and football to cooking and Prom. The DFKDC Holiday Celebration is more than a seasonal party; it is our culminating year-end event that gives our participants (the beneficiaries of our free DFKDC clinics) the opportunity to "pay-compassion-forward”. Participants engage in a variety of philanthropic activities at the Holiday Celebration including: wrapping presents for underprivileged children; decorating desserts for homeless shelters; making holiday cards for Veterans, and more. The DFKDC Holiday Celebration is a time for fun and philanthropy, and a reminder that their disabilities will not hold them back from reaching their potential.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

DFKDC's mentorship program that provides communication, leadership, and vocational skill building for young adults with developmental delays and/or physical disabilities in the DC area. The program concept derived from the need to provide DFKDC participants with resources to expand and grow after their time in DFKDC clinics. Over the course of 3 months, the program offers participants both skill-building workshops on topics such as resume development, interviewing, and formal e-mail communication as well as off-site group community service projects, site visits to places that employ those with disabilities, and opportunities to network. We seek for participants to walk away with meaningful relationships, new confidence, and real skills that allow them to pursue independence and gainful employment.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

U.S. Center for SafeSport 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In which field trips equals DFKDC adaptive clinics and programs

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Field Trips = DFKDC Adaptive Clinics (In Person & Virtual)

Number of children with disabilities receiving early intervention services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of participants in database that have been served.

Total repeating participants (youth with disabilities) served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

total volunteers served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total Repeating Volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total participants (youth with disabilities) who attended DFKDC Adaptive Ice Hockey

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average Cost/Participant In Kind and Cash for 1 year of clinics and 1 holiday program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults, People with disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the average cost per participant (in kind and cash) to DFKDC for 1 year of clinics and 1 holiday program. All programs are 100% FREE for participants.

Total number of participants who attended DFKDC Adaptive Water Sports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

DFKDC events/clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Youth Who Successfully Graduated from Dreams For Kids DC Your Path To Success Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, At-risk youth

Related Program

Your Path To Success

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

o All graduated participants successfully:  Created a professional resume  Participated in mock interviews with two different experts in varying fields  Learned basics of digital communication

Number of youth programs offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with diseases and illnesses, At-risk youth, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

DFKDC Programs & Established Year: -Adaptive Clinics (in person & virtual, est 2011) -Holiday Celebration (in person & virtual, est 2011) -Your Path To Success (est 2017) -Equality Summit (est 2020)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

All too often children with disabilities are isolated and don't have adequate opportunities to partake in physical activities that other children are able to experience daily. We differentiate ourselves from our competitors by the quality and abundance of volunteer support we offer. Each of our clinics ensures a 1:1 ratio of volunteer to participant.

Participating in challenging activities with peers increases and reinforces a child's positive belief in their own abilities, building immeasurable confidence and self-esteem. [Data taken from the 2014 Annual Disability Statistics Compendium]. Currently, there are many communities for families with physical and developmentally disabled children; however, only one group (KEEN) provides a variety of recreational activities for these children. Other organizations segregate activities and support on the type of disability. There is a need to provide more and a larger variety of activities on a regular basis. Adaptive physical clinics help move children with disabilities off the sidelines to engage in sports, arts and other recreational activities. When adaptive programs are inclusive of all ages and all disabilities, as well as and non-disabled peers and siblings—it allows those with disabilities to grow beyond the segregated settings that have existed for so many years. This variety and inclusion gives children a chance to try different sports, adds to the skills developed, and increases the likelihood of finding activities for lifetime participation, which can lead to growth in social skills. We differentiate ourselves from our competitors by the quality and abundance of volunteer support we offer. Each of our clinics ensures a 1:1 ratio of volunteer to participant. This amount of attention helps build confidence in the participant, and helps them 'come out of their shell'. These volunteer-participant relationships also continues outside of DFKDC. We have had many parents request to contact their volunteers to further the bond the volunteers/participants created at DFKDC clinics; thereby, creating a mentorship relationship much like Big Brothers & Big Sisters.

This also shows the impact of DFKDC on volunteers, and the importance of giving back and the impact young adults can make. DFKDC events accommodate a large number of participants [depending on the activity], giving 50 – 150 children the opportunity to attend. DFKDC also focuses on organizing highly visible clinics that garner a lot of interest and media attention--to enable us to promote and spread awareness for adaptive events in the area. DFKDC's clinics range from water-skiing to horseback riding to partnering with professional sports teams such as the Washington Capitals, Washington Redskins, and D.C. United.

We have over 700 participants and 1200 volunteers in our database. Through our programs, we are able to accomplish our goals of creating empowerment.

In 2017, DFKDC and the EDC Jewish Community Center (EDCJCC) teamed up to create a mentorship program entitled "Your Path To Success", which provided communication, leadership, and vocational skill building for young adults with developmental delays and/or physical disabilities in the DC/Maryland/Virginia area. The program concept derived from the need to provide DFKDC participants with resources to expand and grow after their time in DFKDC clinics. Congruently, the EDCJCC has been seeking more ways to engage their constituents with disabilities. Currently, in its pilot season, we had 6 mentors (volunteers) and 6 mentees (participants). Over the course of 6 months, the program offered participants both skill-building workshops on topics such as resume development, interviewing, and formal e-mail communication as well as off-site group community service projects, site visits to places that employ those with disabilities, and opportunities to network. Since 2017, we have held the program once a year and found employment for 6 of our mentees!

We are preparing to launch a new program in 2021 - the DFKDC Equality Summit Leadership program. DFKDC wants to be on the forefront of change and equality empowerment. This is a commitment we make to our families through our mission and programming. With a diverse population that includes 36% African American, 8% Asian American, and 1% Middle Eastern—it is pivotal for DFKDC to advocate for their families and promote disability awareness. The annual Equality Summit will focus on one important topic that our society is facing each year and bring together thought leaders, speakers, and our own DFKDC participants to share their experiences, learn from each other, and most importantly – discuss how we can support change. DFKDC’s commitment is to select youth with disabilities (our participants) during each yearly summit and work with them to create the following year’s equality summit.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We established a parent committee in 2017 who have served as advocates for our mission and programs. Our parents committee shares our information with other groups that they belong in to introduce DFKDC to other families. We also plan to add new clinics over the next three years. In 2014, we incorporated a prom at the request of parents. We have received positive feedback regarding our new arts and cooking clinics, and in 2018 we hosted our first STEM clinic. 2019 saw the creation of our first ever talent show, which was also a success. The parent committee has supported our recent program creation: The Equality Summit Leadership Program in 2020.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

DREAMS FOR KIDS DC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

DREAMS FOR KIDS DC

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rachel Merritt

Madison Government Solutions

Term: 2019 - 2021

Andrew Horn

IntrigueAgency, AbilityList

Christi Main

The Crypsis Group

Tom Prather

Blue Wave Media

Attie Poirier

Microstrategy

Seye Iwarere

US Patent & Trade Office

Chloe Stewart

Washington Post

Teresa Fox

United States Air Force

Madison West

MAXIMUS Foundation

Jay Chesley

US Office of Personnel Management

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.