UNITED WAY CHATTANOOGA

A Connected Community Changes Everything

Chattanooga, TN   |  www.unitedwaycha.org

Mission

United Way of Greater Chattanooga envisions a community where all individuals and families achieve their full human potential through education, stability and health & well-being.

Ruling year info

1957

President

Mrs. Lesley Scearce

Main address

630 Market Street

Chattanooga, TN 37402 USA

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EIN

62-0565962

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Focusing on education, health and stability, United Way works to address our community’s biggest challenges.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Investment

We provide funding for over 75 non-profit programs and initiatives. This funding is approved by a local community investment committee and our board of directors, for those programs which can measurably impact our mission’s key focus areas. Trained community volunteers annually assess significant amounts of data, and the programmatic results of funded organizations, which address community needs. Through annual reporting and assessment of partner organizations, we ensure funded organizations are financially sound with reliable, measurable results which effectively address our impact goals, and the needs of the communities we serve.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We support initiatives and program services in Hamilton County (and in the Greater Chattanooga area) that focus on Building Stable Lives (BSL) with the goal of helping families and individuals become more self-sufficient. BSL addresses the root cause of family instability in specific community neighborhoods. The BSL “coaching model” partners with local non-profits and organizations to help families and individuals in lower income neighborhoods become more economically and socially independent. In a related way, our 211 information and referral program connects people to community agencies and organizations which provide services to address critical needs and helps deter reliance on social services. In 2019 our 211 team connected over 24,000 people with vital services. In 2019 we also began installing 211 kiosks in two area schools, with plans to expand this program.

Population(s) Served
Families

Programming and collaborations in early childhood specialized programs work towards the goal of preparing children for success in school. Parents of preschool children are provided free resources to educate and promote school readiness. Since 2017, over 20,000 children from birth until their 5th birthday, in our 6-county service area, receive free monthly books through Imagination Library. We have partnered with Imagination Library for over 15 years. We also partner with leading public-private coalitions to address access to quality education resources for parents of preschool children, including parent information and training, and availability of annual developmental screenings through partner organizations.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

When we come together with one voice, our community is truly advocating for our neighbors in need. From our unique position at the center of the nonprofit, government, philanthropic and business communities, United Way drives focused collaboration among our partners to address community-specific challenges with an emphasis on education, health and stability to provide avenues for everyone to engage in creating change.

To create an environment of opportunity, where every child born in our community can succeed, we need to focus on three key areas: people, places and systems.

Through the caring power of tens of thousands of individuals, we invest in innovative solutions, convene the right partnerships and mobilize the best resources to fight our most dire social problems. Together, we drive measurable, lasting impact for our community.

We focus on building stronger neighborhoods, improving the systems that serve children and families and providing stability across our region. This targeted approach is fueled by broad civic engagement that brings together the people, resources and services necessary to improve economic mobility.

We partner with local agencies focused specifically on the success of children and youth to foster lasting change where it matters most: where we live.

We fund various initiatives in six counties around Greater Chattanooga – including Hamilton, Marion, Walker, Dade, Catoosa and Rhea. All funds are invested into the same community that contributed them. The needs surrounding education, stability and health & wellbeing, as well as strong partnerships with organizations, communities and innovative leaders all play a part in where we work.

We execute strategies which accelerate our impact, mobilize people to action, and convene partners to solve problems. We are re-imagining the Community Investment Process (formerly allocations) for greater alignment, collaboration and impact. We will mobilize people to act and give by connecting them, digitally and relationally, with the causes they love. We engage donors through every age and stage of life. We have created the John P. Guerry Hub for Social Innovation, for peak collaboration and community problem solving.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Through the caring power of tens of thousands of individuals, we invest in innovative solutions, convene the right partnerships and mobilize the best resources to fight our most dire social problems. Together, we drive measurable, lasting impact for our community. We focus on building stronger neighborhoods, improving the systems that serve children and families and providing stability across our region. This targeted approach is fueled by broad civic engagement that brings together the people, resources and services necessary to improve economic mobility.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

UNITED WAY CHATTANOOGA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UNITED WAY CHATTANOOGA

Board of directors
as of 11/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Tom White

TOM WHITE

ELAINE HARPER

TOM GLENN

ZAN GUERRY

MICHAEL ST. CHARLES

TOM HAYSLETT

JIM CATANZARO, JR.

JAY DALE

ALNOOR DHANANI

JOHN GUERRY

STEVE ANGLE

CHARLES ARANT

CAROLINE BENTLEY

RUSS BLAKELY

SCOTT BROWN

AMBER CAMBRON

RYAN CRIMMINS

JEFF CRONAN

JIM COPPINGER

JEFF DELOACH

PATTI DUNGAN

SCOTT FOSSE

JUDY GRAHAM

TOM GREENHOLTZ

ROGER HINCKLEY

LURONE JENNINGS

BRYAN JOHNSON

MARY KILBRIDE

MICHAEL KRAMER

CORA LANIER

IAN LEAVY

HODGEN MAINDA

MICHAEL MATHIS

TOM MCCALLIE

DONNA MCCONNICO

WARREN MCEWEN

DON MUELLER

JOHN PHILLIPS

HELEN PREGULMAN

THOMAS QUESSINBERRY

MATT ROYAL

KEITH SANFORD

EDNA VARNER

REV. TERNAE JORDAN

MICHAEL LEBOVITZ

REGGIE PIERCY

DAMON RAINES

CAM SCEARCE

CHRIS SISLO

KENNETH SMITH

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/6/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data