Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee

Making a Big Impact in Little Lives

aka Big Brothers Big Sisters of East TN; BBBS-ETN   |   Knoxville, TN   |  www.TennesseeBig.org

Mission

To provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one to one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

Ruling year info

1975

CEO

Brent J. Waugh

Main address

318 N. Gay Street Suite 100

Knoxville, TN 37917 USA

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EIN

62-0842531

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One to One Mentoring

COMMUNITY BASED MENTORING offers opportunities for adults to build relationships with children on weekends, in the evenings, during summer days - basically anytime that is convenient for the adult, child, and family.

SCHOOL BASED MENTORING provides volunteers the opportunity to spend one hour a week with their "Little" at school. Teachers are flexible to fit the volunteer's schedule, confident that the relationship will positively improve the child's educational experience.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee serves children age 6 to 18 in one-to-one mentoring. We partner with parents/guardians, volunteers, and others in the community and hold ourselves accountable for each child in our program achieving:

Higher aspirations, greater confidence, and better relationships

Avoidance of risky behaviors

Educational success

Big Brothers Big Sisters is committed to enhancing our role in being a part of a collaborative system of support that leads to positive outcomes for East Tennessee’s youth. We partner with families, donors, volunteers, schools, government, and other organizations to provide children facing adversity with the tools they need to not only succeed, but thrive. Research demonstrates that Big Brothers Big Sisters evidenced based programs helps children stay in school and out of trouble.

To ensure we are able to effectively and efficiently address children’s needs long into the future, we are focusing on building and strengthening our relationships with key educational and juvenile justice partners. Together we will create stronger families, better schools, and safer communities.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter 1971

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 1970

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

BBBSETN is committed to enhancing our role in being a part of a collaborative system of support that leads to positive outcomes for East Tennessee’s youth. We partner with donors, volunteers, churches, faith based organizations, schools, government, and others to provide children facing adversity with the tools they need to not only succeed, but thrive. We hold ourselves accountable for children served through Big Brothers Big Sisters achieving educational success, having higher aspirations and avoiding risky behaviors.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is creating transformational change in East Tennessee -- improved school performance and graduation rates, safer communities, and healthier lifestyles – all of which are improving East Tennessee’s financial health by decreasing the amount of taxpayer revenue needed to support individuals who choose to lead a life of crime as well as those who are supported by the public welfare system.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is serving as a solution to improving the livelihood of our community. Our evidenced based outcomes and the positive impact we can produce is only limited by the funding available to help children realize their full potential through one-to-one mentoring.

Changing Futures
Big Brothers Big Sisters one-to-one mentoring has long been linked through empirical research to outcomes for children. A landmark control-group study in the 1990’s found that BBBS-mentored youth skipped half as many days of school as control group youth, felt more competent in their schoolwork, skipped fewer classes, and showed gains in grade point average. Additional studies found similar results; for example, improvements in class work quality, school behavior, number of assignments turned in, performance in Science & English, Reading and Math scores on standardized tests, overall grades, peer relationships, and avoidance of school infractions.
In March 2013, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America reported results of a large-scale research study evaluating 1,300 “higher-risk” youth with several risk factors for teen pregnancy, mental health problems, delinquency and school failure. The study compared youth with mentors to those without who faced similar challenges. The youth matched with a mentor for one year improved social competence, academic attitudes and grades.

Success in Serving Children and Their Achievements
Success in life requires both academic and socio-emotional competencies (good parental relationship, such as confidence, getting along with peers, conscientiousness, making good decisions, emotional stability). BBBS mentoring produces results because it addresses both academic and socio-emotional needs through its focus on the whole child and building life skills. At the core of mentoring is a long-term, trusting friendship with a caring adult who models and teaches skills, behaviors and perspectives. Changes in the child’s behavior, attitude and school performance emanate from the bond built between mentor and child. High-quality mentoring relationships of one year or more have the potential to produce enduring developmental outcomes for disadvantaged youth.
Economically disadvantaged students are the children most at risk of teen pregnancy, mental health problems, delinquency, school failure and other risky behaviors.

BBBSETN’s experience in serving at risk youth, children of prisoners and truant youth has shown success in important outcomes for children facing adversity. Specifically, we have experienced marked improvement for the children in our program in the areas of Parental Trust, Attitudes toward Risky Behaviors, Scholastic Competency, Grades and Truancy. Serving children of prisoners and juvenile justice involved youth has also led to strong and enduring matches for some of our most vulnerable, at-risk children enrolled in BBBSETN.

Having served East Tennessee 1970 years, BBBSETN is absolutely committed to continuing to serve East Tennessee children in need of a mentor. Our funding base is diverse, including revenue from fundraising events, grants/foundations and contributions. And our Board of Directors is committed to building sustainable resources, with an increased focus on raising private dollars. Our Board and stakeholders are committed to ensuring that our program not only survives but thrives in East Tennessee.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Phone Surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee

Board of directors
as of 7/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nick Wilson

Nick Wilson

Portfolio Manager

Heidi Carriero

COO

Brooke Lawson

Relationship Manager

Deedee Brownlee

School Counselor

Carol Davis

Progam Manager

Carly Harrington

Director of Public Affairs

Amanda Kenner

AVP, Fraud

Maria Nia

HR Generalist

Dipakkumar Patel

Architectural Project Manager

Chris Parrott

Regional Marketing Coordinator

Derrick Reasor

Management

Aaron Riley

Director, Business Development

Richard Riley

Accountant

Brandon Stroud

VP, IT Operations & Logistics

Charles Swanson

Attorney

Paige Walton

Managing Director

Charley Bible

VP of Operations

Brandon Hardin

Pilot

Jean Fremont

DJ

Dino Cartwright

Public Relations

Kenneth Herring

Manager

Crystal Ivey

Broadband Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.