PLATINUM2024

Prison Fellowship Ministries

aka Prison Fellowship, Angel Tree, Warden Exchange   |   Lansdowne, VA   |  www.prisonfellowship.org

Mission

Prison Fellowship, which is active in all 50 states, aims to restore all those affected by crime and incarceration.

Ruling year info

1977

President and CEO

Heather J. Rice-Minus

Main address

44180 Riverside Parkway

Lansdowne, VA 20176 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

62-0988294

NTEE code info

Christian (X20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When Chuck Colson founded Prison Fellowship in 1976, there were 440,000 men and women behind bars in the U.S. Today, there are 1.8 million - an increase of more than 400%. More than 450,000 people are released from correctional facilities every year, and two-thirds of them are rearrested within three years. The annual cost to incarcerate and reincarcerate this many people exceeds $80 billion. Beyond the price tag, soaring levels of incarceration and recidivism also take a terrible toll on Americas communities and families. The cycle of crime and incarceration produces broken relationships, victimization, despair, and instability. Clearly, something isn't working. As the nations largest Christian nonprofit serving prisoners, former prisoners, and their families, and a leading advocate for criminal justice reform, Prison Fellowship aims to restore the lives of those affected by crime and incarceration.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Prison Fellowship Angel Tree™

Prison Fellowship Angel Tree equips churches to strengthen relationships between incarcerated parents and their children and support the families of prisoners year-round. Angel Tree provides an opportunity for local congregations to extend the hope of the Gospel and welcome Angel Tree families into church life by delivering Christmas gifts on behalf of incarcerated parents, sending kids to summer camp, facilitating one-day sports camps, and more.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Children and youth

The Prison Fellowship Academy uses targeted curriculum, compassionate coaches, and restorative community to replace participants criminal thinking and behaviors with renewed purpose and biblically based life principles. Graduates complete the yearlong program as change agents and good citizens inside and outside of prison.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

In prison yards across the country, men and women are being introduced to the hope of Jesus Christ through one- and two-day Prison Fellowship Hope Events that feature a variety of inspirational speakers and musicians. While providing a brief respite from the challenges of prison life, these events give prisoners the chance to respond to Christ and take the next step of joining a faith community behind bars.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Thousands of trained Prison Fellowship volunteers across the country lead small-group studies and seminars known as Prison Fellowship Connection Classes. These classes address topics such as substance abuse recovery, parenting, and life skills. In these environments, participants can be a part of a positive, growing community and develop transformative skills in a supportive, Christian atmosphere.

Population(s) Served

Inside Journal is a quarterly newspaper printed and distributed by Prison Fellowship to correctional facilities across the country. Written specifically for incarcerated men and women, each issue (offered in a mens edition, a womens edition, and a Spanish-language edition) explains the Gospel in a fresh way, offers encouragement and motivation, and shares practical advice for the daily struggles of prison life. Distributed to prisoners via chaplains, program coordinators, and in-prison volunteers, Inside Journal provides a unique way to share the hope of Jesus with those who may never attend a chapel service or Bible study.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Warden Exchange equips and trains correctional leaders to change the culture of prison. A robust, data-driven program comprising education, self-reflection, planning, and implementation, Warden Exchange imparts skills and knowledge that can result in a safer, more restorative prison environment. Warden Exchange empowers prison leaders to create a culture that improves well-being for prisoners and staff, increasing human flourishing both inside and outside of prison.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Prison Fellowship advocates for justice that restores, an approach to criminal justice that recognizes the value and potential of every person. We promote reforms that help transform those responsible for crime, validate victims, and create safer communities by:
Advancing accountability that is proportional and restorative, including alternatives to incarceration where possible.
Facilitating good citizenship through a safe and constructive corrections culture that provides prisoners opportunities to develop life skills and character, make amends for their crime, and earn back the publics trust.
Unlocking second chances, so people with a criminal record can achieve closure and return to communities as contributing citizens who fulfill their God-given potential.
Supporting values-based reforms that will protect communities and officers from harm while promoting respect, dignity, and cooperation.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Adults

The Urban Ministry Institute (TUMI) is an intensive biblical studies course offered by Prison Fellowship in conjunction with World Impact. It teaches and equips prisoners to become Christian leaders in prisons and in the urban communities to which many of them will return. Launched in prisons in 2007, TUMI is currently active in 10 states and 42 prisons , both male and female, with more than 1,330 prisoners participating. Graduates of the program have been recognized as leaders in their respective correctional institutions and have made positive transitions back into their communities as spouses, parents, employees, and urban missionaries.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Created during COVID-19 prison shutdowns, Prison Fellowships Floodlight brings positive, inspirational, and educational content to facilities across the country.

In addition to creating our own original content, Prison Fellowship partners with top Christian content providers, including Alpha, Celebrate Recovery, and others. Each month correctional staff receive a curated list of free, high-quality video content they can download and share on prison televisions and devices (where available). Floodlight is now accessible to more than 550,000 incarcerated viewers in more than 400 correctional facilities across 49 states.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Create: New Beginnings takes incarcerated women through a series of restorative, art-based, in-prison workshops. Through painting and other creative arts, women behind bars explore topics such as shame, self-doubt, empathy, and forgivenessall in a faith-based environment of introspection, healing, and community support. Through artistic expression, participants in this Prison Fellowship program explore core issues of identity and purpose, reimagining their futures with a new sense of hope.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2017

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2017

Excellence in Giving 2017

Affiliations & memberships

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2017

Better Business Bureau 2017

American Correctional Association 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Bibles distributed to the men, women, and children we serve

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prison Fellowship supplies English- and Spanish-language Bibles with large-print and high-quality devotional content to prisoners and free, easy-to-read Bibles to children with a parent in prison.

Number of incarcerated men, women, and their children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prison Fellowship is the nations largest Christian nonprofit serving prisoners, former prisoners, and their families, and a leading advocate for criminal justice reform.

Number of children who received Angel Tree Christmas gifts and the Gospel

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prison Fellowship Angel Tree mobilizes churches and organizations, delivering a Christmas gift, Bible, and message of love to hundreds of thousands of children on behalf of their parent in prison.

Number of Prison Fellowship Academy sites in correctional facilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Prison Fellowship Academy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prison Fellowship Academy builds communities and creates opportunities for men and women in prison to practice and develop values that transform them and others into good citizens.

Number of states with Prison Fellowship Academy sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Prison Fellowship Academy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Using targeted curriculum, compassionate coaches, and restorative community engagement, Prison Fellowship Academy participants develop and practice biblically based Values of Good Citizenship.

Number of Warden Exchange participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Warden Exchange

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Warden Exchange develops transformational correctional leaders who drive positive culture change in their prison communities, improving the environment and outcomes of prisons for all.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goals, by 2026:
1) Reach hundreds of thousands of incarcerated men and women per month through evangelism, discipleship, and rehabilitation programs; 2) Establish 238 Academy sites; 3) Train thousands of people through the Academy, with incarcerated men and women serving out their sentences as positive peer models, and a three-year recidivism rate no greater than 10% for participants after release, resulting in lower crime rates and housing costs through reduced recidivism; 4) Equip wardens from all 50 states through the Warden Exchange program ; 5) Support children of incarcerated parents reached through the Angel Tree program every year, with 5,800 of these children attending Angel Tree summer camps or sports clinics; 6) Create systemic change in public attitude and government policies regarding corrections and people with a criminal history, resulting in improved correctional outcomes and reduced barriers to success for released prisoners.

As part of our strategic plan, we plan to: 1) Establish an Academy in 1 men's and 1 women's prison in each state; 2) Provide a coordinated continuum of evangelism, discipleship, and rehabilitation, equipping the incarcerated for purposeful life in prison and beyond; 3) Empower wardens in every state to be change agents in their prisons through our Warden Exchange program; 4) Support our graduates' successful reentry by connecting them with networks of identified reentry resources and churches in major metropolitan areas; 5) Expand the reach of Angel Tree Christmas, Angel Tree Camping, Angel Tree Sports Camps and year-round support of Angel Tree families by local congregations, restoring and investing in the next generation of at-risk children and the families to which prisoners will return; 6) Advocate for values-based federal and state criminal justice reforms that facilitate this vision, including proportional punishment, constructive prison culture, and closure for those who have completed their sentences; 7) Equip local churches to partake in ministry efforts to bring hope to incarcerated individuals, provide support to the families of prisoners, and seek justice that restores.

As the nations largest Christian nonprofit serving prisoners, former prisoners, and their families, and with almost 50 years spent cultivating relationships with volunteers, supporters, legislators, partner organizations, and departments of corrections, Prison Fellowship is uniquely positioned to achieve its mission. Our program goals are pursued by nearly 300 paid staff members and 8,500 volunteers. Additionally, we partner with more than 5,400 churches and organizations that share our vision. To achieve our ambitious goals over the next decade, we are now laying the groundwork to significantly increase our revenue, build up our staff, improve brand awareness, recruit many new volunteers, and build relationships with additional partners. Prison Fellowships vision is to see all people affected by crime reconciled to God, their families, and their communities.

A few key achievements from our 2023 annual report:
Last year, more than 1,000 prisoners changed their lives in the supportive community of the Prison Fellowship Academy at 218 sites in 41 states. 54 new Academy sites were launched for the very first time.
1,559 children received mentorship at an Angel Tree sports camp, and 4,917 experienced the love of God in the great outdoors with Angel Tree camping. Through these opportunities, 856 children and caregivers made commitments to Christ.
In 2023, 253,132 Angel Tree children received a gift in the name of their incarcerated parent through the efforts of more than 5,000 churches and organizations across the country. 244 Angel Tree parent day events equipped 28,000+ men and women in prison to be positive forces in their childrens lives.
More than 330 women found a safe place to explore lifes hurts and find healing through Create: New Beginnings, a restorative art program created by Prison Fellowship. This year, in partnership with Tyndale, Prison Fellowship released the book Create: New Beginnings as a small-group curriculum for women outside prison bars.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, Barna polling to collect feedback from practicing Christians

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback, Many of the people we serve don’t have access to typical forms of response, such as electronic commu

Financials

Prison Fellowship Ministries
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Prison Fellowship Ministries

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Paul Cauwels

Cauwels Investments, LLC

Term: 2023 -

Paul Cauwels

Cauwels Investments, LLC

Chris Colson

Truist Bank

Robert Milligan

Wood-Stieper Capital Group

W. Brian Byrd

Texas Family Medicine

Burl Cain

Mississippi DOC

Tom Mader

Guardity Technologies, Inc.

Carl Dill, JR.

TriCour Partners

Oladipo Ashiru

Veritas Capital

Dorcas Haque

Haque Family Foundation

Monique Miles

Old Town Associates, P.C.

Joseph Skowron, III

NCS-Inside

Ralph Diaz

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Howard Park

GI PARTNERS

Jennifer Alt

Segel Group Limited

Laura Batterson

National Community Church

Irenee May

Beacon Point Advisors

Douglas Peterson

Keating | O'Gara

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/31/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.