PLATINUM2023

Operation Stand Down Tennessee

Engage. Equip. Empower. Veterans.

Nashville, TN   |  www.osdtn.org

Mission

Operation Stand Down Tennessee's mission is to provide and connect Veterans and their families with comprehensive resources focused on transition, employment, housing, benefits, peer engagement, volunteerism and connection to the community.  As the state’s only recognized Veterans Service Center, OSDTN engages, equips and empowers Veterans transitioning from successful military service to civilian life. The organization helps Veterans who have just out-processed, as well as those who completed their service years ago.

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Brig Gen Eden Murrie

Main address

1125 12th Avenue South

Nashville, TN 37203 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Operation Stand Down Nashville

EIN

62-1638832

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Currently, there are about 470,000 Veterans living in Tennessee. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, a U.S. military Veteran commits suicide every 65 minutes, one in five homeless is a Veteran, and in 2016, 3.6% or approximately 17,000 Veterans in Tennessee were unemployed. Fort Campbell U.S. Army Base lies on the Kentucky - Tennessee border between the towns of Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee about 50 miles from Nashville. Each month 300-400 military personnel leave their service from Fort Campbell and many choose to make Nashville their home. OSDTN aims to assist Veterans in making healthy transitions from their military service to civilian lives and to prevent Veteran suicide and homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clinical Services

OSDTN provides transitional housing for 42 homeless men and women Veterans. Our program utilizes a home setting to provide a safe, structured, and secure environment. Our goal is to mentor Veterans who are experiencing life-controlling situations and to empower them in rebuilding their own foundations and support systems. Circumstances may include addiction, legal issues, education obstacles, and employment barriers. Each Veteran participates in supportive meetings, gains employment and re-establishes a successful lifestyle, contributes to the upkeep of a home in a neighborhood, and creates a budget and savings plan. The end result is for the Veteran to develop successful work habits and healthy interpersonal skills. Professional case management is provided. Veterans may remain in the program for up to two years; however the average resident stays six to nine months. Allowing our Veterans to reside up to two years gives them the opportunity to address any issues while living in a stable environment with other Veterans and to build their confidence for a successful transition to civilian life.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Through our Veteran Service Center, OSDTN provides a wide variety of services for ALL Veterans and their family members. Services include: Legal Aid, VA Benefits Counseling, Financial Coaching, Basic Needs (Food, Shelter, Personal Care Items, Clothing and Transportation), VA Home Loan Workshops, Military Records Assistance, Notary Services, Project Healing Waters, Reboot Combat Recovery, Sounds of Acoustic Recovery, Life Skills Programs, Computer Resources, Networking Opportunities, Family Support and Service Referrals. Additionally, the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program provides direct assistance designed for Veterans earning less than 50% of the area median income and who are in danger of losing their housing, or are homeless and want housing. Most SSVF eligible Veterans and their families have unsuitable housing and/or unfavorable financial or legal histories which present barriers to housing. The goal of the SSVF Program is to help Veterans achieve stability and independence.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Career Services helps Veterans who have just out-processed from the military, as well as those who completed their service years ago with job placement assistance, computer training, résumé development, professional development workshops, interview preparation, and budget counseling. Veterans are interviewed by our Career Services staff to assess their individual needs. After a Veteran secures employment, we can help provide items that will contribute to his/her success at the new place of employment. These items include work boots, tools/ equipment, bus passes or gas cards to help with transportation, and specialized clothing. All items are provided once the Veteran’s employment has been verified. We also provide an innovative 12-week cohort called Career Recon to help Veterans within a year of transition to find their right fit in the civilian workforce while earning their Certificate of Business Acumen from Belmont University's Jack C. Massey College of Business.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Veterans
Military personnel

Operation Commissary is an innovative program designed by OSDTN to assist Veterans who are experiencing food insecurity across our 20-county service area within Middle Tennessee.
The Operation Commissary team assists Veterans with short-term food delivery to homes, tailored case management, and connections to community resources. The team also strategically places food bag pick up locations at Veteran-specific locations like VFW Halls, VSO offices, and Student Veteran Centers so that Veterans in need do not need to drive to a food bag to get food in a crisis.
This approach promotes long-term food and financial stability.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Network Admin and Access Centers - 3 year 2021

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network 2000

Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce 2002

National Coalition of Homeless Veterans 1999

Second Harvest Food Bank 1999

Nashville Coalition for the Homeless 2003

Tennessee Association of Alcohol, Drug and other Addiction Services (TAADAS) 2003

Alcohol and Drug Council of Middle Tennessee 2002

CABLE 2018

Bank of America Neighborhood Builder 2020

Salute to Excellence New Generations Award 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of men and women Veterans who received services in our Veteran Service Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Supportive Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Veterans who found or upgraded their employment through our Employment Department

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Clinical Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of men and women Veterans who participated in our Transitional Housing Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Clinical Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Veterans and their families who were assisted in filing disability claims

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Supportive Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Veterans and their families who received financial assistance to either move from being homeless into permanent housing or to remain in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Clinical Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Veterans who received free clothing items from our 12th Ave Thrift Store

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers who contributed their time at our Veteran Service Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Clinical Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Operation Commissary

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As the state's ONLY recognized Veterans Service Center, Operation Stand Down Tennessee engages, equips and empowers Veterans transitioning from successful military service to civilian life. The organization helps Veterans who have just out-processed, as well as those who completed their service years ago.

OSDTN's roots are in assisting homeless Veterans and homelessness prevention. Today, OSDTN's services have grown to include: Veterans benefits education & access, job readiness & placement, financial counseling, legal assistance, housing, family support, basic needs, assistance navigating the VA system and service referrals.

Operation Stand Down Tennessee has been serving Veterans in Tennessee for 30 years. About 70% of OSDTN's staff members are Veterans. By sharing common experiences, Veterans are uniquely qualified to communicate and assist Veterans and their families in need. Last year, OSDTN provided life-changing services to 2,840 Veterans and we are on track to exceed that number in 2023. OSDTN uses the "whole Veteran" approach and recognizes each Veteran is a unique individual with specific needs. OSDTN has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to meeting the needs of Veterans in a fiscally responsible manner as evidenced in 2021 by 83% of all revenue being spent toward services for Veterans and their families.

We are proud to have served 1,698 individual Veterans through our Service Centers, with a total of 12,523 in-person visits. This averages out to be 7 visits per Veteran in 2022. Case managers logged 3,755 hours of virtual service to 933 unique Veterans, an average of 4 hours per client. We provided career services to 171 Veterans, of which approximately one-third were in their first 3 years of transition from the military. Through the transitional housing program, 108 Veterans were housed in 2022 with a success rate of 75% moving into permanent housing at the conclusion of their enrollment. We provided aftercare case management to 43 Veterans who successfully completed transitional housing. Last year, OSDTN helped 502 Veterans with housing assistance for rent, utilities, and deposits and 89 Veterans received emergency housing for family sheltering or quarantine. We helped 610 Veterans with monthly food delivery through Operation Commissary and provided 1,367 food bags to remote pick-up locations. In total, 742 volunteers gave 2,766 hours of service to OSDTN last year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

Operation Stand Down Tennessee
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Operation Stand Down Tennessee

Board of directors
as of 07/25/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Seth Ogden

Patterson Intellectual Property Law

Term: 2023 - 2022

Bob Tuke

Trauger & Tuke, US Marine Corps Veteran

Mike Fitz

C-III Capital Partners

John Ford

Davidson County Sheriff's Department

John Gupton

Baker Donelson - US Navy Veteran

Myles MacDonald

Clarity LLC - US Army Veteran

Will Martin

Cushion Employer Services

Ross Florey

Fifth Third Bank - US Army Veteran

Julius Hill

Metro Board of Education - US Army Veteran

Dan Joniak

First Tennessee Bank - US Army Veteran

Charles Roberson

Mid Atlantic Securities - US Air Force Veteran

Mark Watson

Self Employed

Dianne Seloff

Aspire Health

Dave Ford

Bottom Line Consortium US Navy Veteran

Stacy Alcala

MP&F Strategic Communications

Ylonda Banister

State of TN

Joshua Coster

Wil-Ro Inc.

Donnie Estes

Amerigroup TN

Robin Fritz

Harpeth Family Management

Dan Joniak

Commerce Bank

Walt Lord

Austin Peay State University

Allison Porter

Attorney at Law

Chad Postema

Amazon

Dianne Spencer

Oakworth Capital Bank

Karon Uzzell-Baggett

SOTS Therapy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.