Williamson County Child Advocacy Center

aka Davis House Child Advocacy Center   |   Franklin, TN   |  www.davishousecac.org

Mission

Davis House Child Advocacy Center provides advocacy, investigative, and therapeutic services to children who have experienced either sexual or significant physical abuse or some other traumatic event, as well as trauma-informed community education, designed to guide our towns and civic spaces to be safer and more resilient for all our citizens.

Ruling year info

1999

Executive Director

Mr. Brent Hutchinson

Main address

1810 Columbia Ave Suite 28

Franklin, TN 37064 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

62-1772353

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Rape Victim Services (F42)

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forensic Interview Program

The primary service that the CAC offers every child referred for services is a Forensic Interview. Forensic Interviews (FI) are the most legally sound interview you can do with a child. Forensic Interviewers are trained to gather information from a child by asking open-ended, non-leading, and non-suggestive questions. Forensic Interviewers focus the interview on the child’s needs by establishing rapport with a child and assessing a child’s developmental level. FIs are conducted at the Child Advocacy Center, a non-threatening and child-friendly environment, to reduce trauma to the child. FIs produce more accurate information than typical interviews which lead to better investigations . FIs also cut down on the number of interviews that a child has to go through due to the fact that FIs are observed by fellow investigators and recorded on DVD or video, which can be used as evidence in court.

Population(s) Served

The Child Advocacy Center (CAC) is a warm and welcoming place for both children and adults. In our Center, children and their families can meet with the professionals who work in the field of child abuse. It is our goal to assist child abuse victims and their families through the investigative process and help families through the difficult process of healing. The Child and Family Advocate works with families during the investigative process by providing support, information and referrals. This can come in many shapes and forms and is tailored to meet the specific needs of each family. It is our goal to help families feel less isolated and more informed during this traumatic time.

Population(s) Served
Families

Counseling is available to support child abuse victims and their families in crisis through the healing process after the abuse. A therapist on staff provides counseling to children victimized by abuse. Counseling is offered in all three center locations (Franklin, Hohenwald, Centerville).  The primary methods of treatment utilized are Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Play Therapy.  We primarily treat the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms brought about by the trauma of abuse.

Population(s) Served
Families

The CAC provides community education focused on prevention and early intervention of child abuse. Programs include Stewards of Children and Signs and Symptoms of Child Sexual Abuse training, along with awareness programs such as Prevent Now and #NIMBY. The key to addressing the issue of child abuse is to educate the community about abuse, services available to victims and the legal obligation of all members of the community to report suspected child abuse. Staff members at Davis House are available for presentations to community organizations and groups to speak about child abuse prevention and there is no fee for this service. Davis House also maintains a library of books, videos and dvds relating to child abuse. They were purchased to help educate children, adults, and professionals working in the field of child abuse. Topics in our library include: child abuse, parenting after child abuse, and child abuse prevention. These resources are available on loan to community members.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CPIT is a state mandated multi-disciplinary team comprised of Child Advocacy Center staff, law enforcement, District Attorney’s office, Department of Children’s Services (DCS), medical professionals, and Juvenile Court officers who work in collaboration to investigate allegations of sexual and/or severe physical abuse perpetrated against children. Another objective of CPIT is to determine the disposition of each case through meetings conducted at Davis House Child Advocacy Center (DHCAC). These meetings occur monthly in each county we serve. In these meetings, each discipline brings their respective expertise and investigative information pertaining to the child victim in an effort to provide appropriate protective, counseling, or other services that the child needs. Legal proceedings and referrals for prosecution of an alleged perpetrator arise from CPIT meetings. In short, services for the welfare of the child and services that seek justice for the child victims originate from these meetings and the CPIT Program.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2010

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2016

Affiliations & memberships

Center for Nonprofit Management (Nashville) 2000

National Children's Alliance - Associate Member 2002

Williamson County Chamber of Commerce 2005

Tennessee Chapter of Children's Advocacy Centers 1999

National Children's Alliance - Full Member 2010

National Children's Alliance Re-Accreditation 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Forensic Interview Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers represent an average of new child clients seen by a forensic interviewer.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Victim Advocacy

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All staff are trained in trauma informed care annually.

Number of youth who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Counseling Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Eighty-five percent of our child therapy clients report improved handling of behavioral symptoms at the end of treatment.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization is seeking to streamline administration such that our board is more actively engaged in strategic advancement of the organization's growth and financial stability. This will also enable our staff team to more readily build necessary programs.

Our strategy is to work across our communities to provide healing and investigative services to child victims of physical and sexual abuse and to make our civic spaces safer for everyone.

We possess a highly trained, expert staff which provides prevention education, community capacity building, and direct services to child victims of abuse and their non-offending caregivers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Davis House serves children up to the age of 18 who allege sexual or significant physical abuse and neglect, as well as their non-offending caregivers, from a four-county region in middle Tennessee. DHCAC also provide community prevention education to help our communities be more trauma-informed and help all of us learn how to be more resilient.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Davis House began an intentional outreach on one identified community of color where we know abuse is likely occurring, but where we believe it is significantly underreported. We began working alongside another nonprofit who has already built trust within the community and are now working to build our own trust with residents so that, when they need our services, they will know us and how we can care for their needs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have gradually become a more community-oriented and -situated organization, so everything we do, within the bounds of our scope of work, is designed to serve the people in our community, broadly, and not simply those who are referred to us. We are now more aware of needs that we specifically can begin to meet and are focused to continue evolving as community needs also evolve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Williamson County Child Advocacy Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Williamson County Child Advocacy Center

Board of directors
as of 1/6/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Brandon Oliver

Pop Healthcare

Term: 2020 - 2021

Brenda Davis

TN Commission on Children and Youth

Ashley Fitz

Zeitlin Real Estate Co.

Brandon Oliver

PopHealthCare

Dan Vild

Advanced Safety & Industrial Supply

Kelly Gilfillan

FW Publishing LLC

Mike Schenck

Elements Massage

Bishakha Van Voris

State of TN - Dept. of Human Services

Joseph Laramie

Fox Valley Technical College

Paul Burris

LBMC

Jim Olin

C2G Advisors, LLC/Olin Realty

Andy Voyles

Bank of England Mortgage

Katie Myers

Sean Moorhead

Jackson National Life Insurance Company

David Adcox

Highland Oil Co.

Brent Hutchinson

Davis House CAC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/06/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.