FOUNDATION FOR EVANGELISM

A Catalyst to Equip Disciples to Share the Good News of Jesus Christ

Lk Junaluska, NC   |  www.FoundationForEvangelism.org

Mission

To promote, encourage, and provide resources for Wesleyan evangelism, inviting all people into life-transforming relationship with Jesus Christ

Ruling year info

1958

President

Jane Boatwright Wood

Main address

125 N Lakeshore Dr PO Box 985

Lk Junaluska, NC 28745 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

62-6040109

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (X12)

Public Foundations (T30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a religious organization.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Christ and the Holy Spirit were the ultimate catalysts fully revealing the detail of God's map to humanity in the Good News of Jesus Christ. In the eighteenth century, the Methodist movement was born under the catalytic creativity of John and Charles Wesley, changing the ways and moving the locations for sharing the Good News, copying patterns established by Christ–common language and accessible sites. Seventy years ago, another group of change agents convened to envision an entity for the sole purpose of ensuring that the Good News of Jesus Christ remained at the heart of the Methodist movement. They called this organization The Foundation for Evangelism. You might ask, “Is evangelism not the mission of the Church?" Yes! We would respond enthusiastically. Has this charge remained the central focus of the Church? Unfortunately, the answer is “No!" The Foundation for Evangelism exists to be the catalyst to remind the Church of its mission and to provide resources for innovation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

E. Stanley Jones Professors of Evangelism

These professors prepare the next generation of leaders for ministry in the local church through classes in evangelism, missions, and a variety of other disciplines all taught with a focus on evangelism in the spirit of John Wesley. Through ongoing research and publication, these professors reach far beyond the seminary walls to educate and equip clergy, laity, and youth for evangelism ministries that bear fruit in the 21st-century local church.

Population(s) Served
Christians
Academics

Honors awarded to United Methodists in each annual conference whose exceptional ministry of evangelism – expressed in Word (what), Sign (why), and Deed (how) – brings people into a life-transforming relationship with Jesus Christ. Evangelism happens in many contexts and many settings; impacts and engages all generations; and requires relationship among a variety of persons.

Population(s) Served
Christians

Originally intended to support lectures at United Methodist-affiliated or Wesleyan-tradition seminaries or related institutions to bring to campus a national or international leader in evangelism for a series of inspirational lectures and classroom appearances, the lecture now focuses beyond the seminary to the local church engaging laity and those serving the local church to learn the newest thinking about holistic evangelism.

Population(s) Served
Christians
Academics

Building upon our tradition of recognizing excellence in local church evangelism, striving to impact younger generations, and encouraging those who seek to grow the United Methodist Church, the Culture of the Call recognizes a church whose culture encourages the next generation of leaders to enter full-time Christian service.

Originally designed “To recognize one local congregation of The United Methodist Church each year that has a history of having young people 35 or younger experience God’s call to full time Christian service as a result of their being active in the life of that church,” the award came to represent a level of excellence desired for all churches as they seek to identify, support, mentor, and encourage young people who are called to Christian service.

The foundation's value to invest in initiatives and partners who can replicate best practices and create awareness among the greatest number of faith communities, led us to partner with and write a grant to the Timothy Circle, a ministry of Be A Disciple. Now this focus is available online to a network of churches, camps, and campus ministries, as well as directly to young people through an app, to create a culture of calling across the U.S.

To learn more, visit www.beadisciple.com/timothy.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Funding for innovative campus-wide ministry that engages, forms and grows disciples - students, faculty, and community - to share the Good News of Jesus Christ on the college campus.

Methodism is rooted in campus ministry. A significant part of the faith formation of both John and Charles Wesley took place on campus. During his college years, John’s participation in a student movement helped lay the foundation for what became a pivotal experience of grace and faith that we now describe as ‘the Aldersgate experience.'

Population(s) Served
Students
Academics

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Methodists, Evangelicals, Teachers, Researchers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of endowments

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Methodists, Evangelicals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Methodists

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Harry Denman Evangelism Awards have represented the largest number of grants. With the new grant foci, we are launching an updated Local Church Grant initiative in 2022 while phasing out the HDEA.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Foundation for Evangelism promotes, encourages, and provides resources for Wesleyan evangelism, inviting all people into a life-transforming relationship with Jesus Christ. We define a transformed life, or disciple of Jesus Christ, as a person so changed through a relationship with Jesus that they cannot stop themselves from serving as Christ served or sharing WHY JESUS in all aspects of their lives.

We have successfully proven our ability to be a catalyst to impact the Church through the E. Stanley Jones Professors of Evangelism initiative. Through our efforts, the United Methodist Church's requirements for ordination were amended to include a required class in evangelism. We followed that effort by successfully raising and managing endowment that supports 13 foundation-vetted professors who are on faculty at 10 US, 1 German, 1 Russian, and 1 Zimbabwean seminary. The professorships are recognized globally for their academic accomplishments, and the chairs are regularly challenged to publish and defend their work on the world stage.

Now, the Foundation is leveraging this success to move the Church to next-level leadership preparation. We are uniquely positioned to work beyond the denominational boundaries to encourage engagement and training of laity through ordination thereby filling the leadership needs of newly emerging expressions of Church while continuing to serve smaller, but vital, local churches in the Wesleyan tradition.

Dimension 1: Longitudinal Study - CATALYST Conversations

The Foundation will connect the knowledge gained from more than 30 years of partnership and leveraging the expertise of the E. Stanley Jones Professors of Evangelism to evaluate and create integrative, holistic evangelism curricula for the local church. Working with strategically located U.S. church partners, this curriculum will be taught in regional local church leadership events. This approach will bring consistent, high-quality training to those desiring to learn new paths. Dimension 1, initiated in 2019 and continuing through 2024, will provide several years of research and measurement. This longitudinal study will provide a new level of sophisticated data and contextually relevant evidence not previously tracked. As we move through Dimension 1, we will learn what works best, what works well, and what needs to be re-tooled.

Dimension 2: Resourcing and Connecting

From our founding, The Foundation for Evangelism was to be a catalyst equipping disciples, lay and clergy, to share the Good News of Jesus Christ. Building upon our 30-year success with the Jones Chairs, we will re-map thinking integratively and holistically about evangelism for the local church. Through consistent training and education over an initial span of several years, we will inject these two dimensions into Church leadership's value structure and thereby ultimately into the congregational culture. Ultimately, the Foundation will provide a resource-rich environment that will provide education, create partnerships to continue innovation and training, and fully utilize technology to generate an ever-growing repository of theologically sound, Wesleyan-tradition information useful beyond any one denomination or institution.

We enjoy relationship, ministry, and partnership with a variety of Wesleyan-tradition seminaries, churches, and organizations. Historically, recipients of most of The Foundation for Evangelism grants have been connected to The United Methodist Church (UMC). However, The Foundation for Evangelism is an independent, Wesleyan-focused foundation; devoted to creating disciples so changed by their relationship with Jesus Christ that they cannot stop themselves from serving as Christ served, or sharing "Why Jesus" in all aspects of their lives.

Through the generosity of our donors, and in keeping with the doctrine, discipline, and spirit of John and Charles Wesley, The Foundation for Evangelism endows and invests resources entrusted to us so these funds will forever be used to invite all people into a life-transforming relationship with Jesus Christ. Organizations that share our vision, values, and mission are invited into conversations to explore potential partnerships.

The Foundation for Evangelism holds endowment funds in excess of $28 million exclusively to support the mission. We have 30-year partnerships in place across the globe strengthened by developing relationships with the two largest Methodist-tradition evangelism entities in the United States giving us the potential to develop partnerships among Wesleyan-tradition denominations beyond those we have historically engaged.

In 2019, the Foundation launched CATALYST 2024 - a five-year strategy for implementing and creating awareness of our grantmaking focus. This work includes an in-depth study of the most extensive and longest-running grant program, the E. Stanley Jones Professors of Evangelism located at 12 seminaries in the US, Germany, and Russia. A year-long independent assessment of impact and ROI study will be received in November 2021 by the Board of Trustees. It will serve as the basis for the completion of impact analysis and an updated strategy for grant implementation.

As part of the CATALYST effort, The Foundation reaffirmed its vision to be a catalyst to equip disciples to share the Good News of Jesus Christ. The governing board ensured that its mission and values supported its constituency focus areas: Wesleyan-tradition, global, evangelistic leaders. Upon naming three strategic grant focus areas - Raising Up Gospel Leaders, Equipping the Local Church (primarily those under 100 in attendance/engaged), and Engaging the Ministry of the Laity - the Foundation retooled its organizational structure and grant processes to support this work, completing the restructuring and hiring of our six-person team in 9/2021.

Governing board membership reflective of the Foundation's expanded constituency as a Wesleyan-tradition, Pan-Methodist grantmaking organization continues as an intentional effort. Since 2019, members from the Church of the Nazarene, the Korean UMC, and the Brazilian Methodist Church. Ex officio trustee positions were offered and accepted by the senior executives of the United Methodist Foundation of the Tennessee/Memphis Conferences and the World Methodist Evangelism Institute.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We continue to intentionally seek out and engage in conversation seeking input, perspectives, ideas, and expressed needs for the Wesleyan-tradition (sometimes called Pan-Methodist) Christian population. These conversations include professionally designed, implemented, and evaluated survey tools; sponsorships where affinity groups gather allowing our team to interact with participants and leaders; pilot grant initiatives; and one-on-one conversations with leaders.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Pilot Grant Programs,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    CATALYST conversations are critical to discern where our grant dollars can have the greatest impact on our mission. In 2020, we received feedback that the lack of diversity among our Local Church Cohort facilitators was a hurdle to open sharing. We amended the facilitator team to reflect the attendees so that we created a more comfortable environment. In 2021, we implemented the amended facilitator team concept [grant term from 7/21 - 6/22]. Immediately following this cohort, a survey including a question about our success in addressing this issue will go to participants. In 11/21, the Foundation collaborated with 300+ leaders in a new partner denomination inviting them to apply and assess our newest grant cycle [launch 1/2022].

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, grant recipients, seminary partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Yes. The Foundation intentionally develops new relationships and invites listening opportunities. We are transparent in our presentation that, while we have clarity of our mission, vision, and values to assess grants and partnerships, we are learning about our expanded Wesleyan-tradition family. These conversations and pilot grants strengthen our ability to be a grantmaking catalyst in the focus areas of leaders, local churches, and laity.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We are establishing new relationships which requires developing awareness.,

Financials

FOUNDATION FOR EVANGELISM
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FOUNDATION FOR EVANGELISM

Board of directors
as of 10/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rev. Allen Black

The United Methodist Church, Tennessee Annual Conference

Term: 2019 - 2022

Eston Brinkley

Retired/ Lay Member of The United Methodist Church

Mark Brinkley

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, and Lay Member of the Church of the Nazarene

Gaye Heck

Lay Member of The United Methodist Church/ BIALSON, BERGEN & SCHWAB

Neil Alexander

Lay Member of The United Methodist Church/ President and Publisher Emeritus of The United Methodist Publishing House.

Guy Ames

Clergy Member The United Methodist Church/ Retired

Ross Barrett

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ BVM Capital Venture Funds

Allen Black

Clergy The United Methodist Church/ District Superintendent - Tennessee Conference

Harry Lyness

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ Retired Owner HJ Lyness Construction

Katherine Cosner

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ Entrepreneur

C. Henry

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ Retired

Barbi Moore

Lay Member the Church of the Nazarene/ Director of Global Outreach at Bethany First Church of the Nazarene

Michael Yang

Lay Member Korean UMC

Robert Miller

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ Former Chairman W.R. Grace and Company

Phil Jamieson

President, United Methodist Foundation for Tennessee/West Kentucky Conference

Wesley Souza

President, World Methodist Evangelism Institute

Debi Nixon

Lay Member The United Methodist Church/ Managing Executive Director Church of the Resurrection

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/01/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.