Christian Womens Job Corps of Madison County Alabama Inc.

aka Christian Job Corps of Madison County, AL, Inc.   |   Huntsville, AL   |  https://cwjc.net/

Mission

Equipping men and women with essential skills to improve their lives

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Ms. Tenesha Thomas

Main address

600 Governors Dr Sw

Huntsville, AL 35801 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

63-1202860

NTEE code info

Vocational Counseling / Guidance / Testing (J21)

Christian (X20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Too many people in our community have not been able to find jobs with livable wages to support themselves and their children. Some lack the education or experience needed to find a job that will allow them to cover their living expenses. Many are dependent on government programs to simply survive each month and don't seem to be able to become independent. Some men and women are underemployed and need to transition to a new career but don't have a knowledge of how to make this change in their lives. Others have been out of the workforce for a number of years and need assistance in navigating re-entry to a career or in embarking on a different career path than what they experienced in their past.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Christian Women's Job Corps

Christian Women's Job Corps of Madison County, AL, Inc. offers free job readiness classes, a volunteer internship program, and GED tutoring.  In addition, we provide a mentor for each participant to work with on goal setting.  We offer our graduates the opportunity to apply for used vehicles, used computers, and scholarships for local colleges and trade schools.  Our participants and graduates have access to free professional clothing in our in house clothes closet.  The expeced outcomes are that our graduates will have a clear understanding of job search skills, will be able to secure employment, and will enroll in higher education when applicable.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Unemployed people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Women's Missionary Union 1998

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Help men and women in the Madison County and surrounding counties become more self-sufficient by increasing the number of graduates obtaining jobs as well as pursuing higher education or vocational training.
2. Help each participant gain knowledge that will help her spiritually and determine the course of her future.
3. Increase the enrollment in our program.

1. Provide life skills training for all students.
2. Give opportunities for students to gain work experience.
3. Prepare students for job searches.
4. Broaden relationships with temp agencies and job training programs.
5. Encourage students to move beyond their current level of education if needed for their career
path.
6. Provide Bible study.
7. Better publicize our services to the community. We also plan to utilize Board members to be
more intentional in their support by becoming community advocates and seeking
opportunities to speak on behalf of CJC.

1. We offer classes in money management to increase financial literacy and communication
skills to deal with workplace situations.
2. Our volunteer internship program allows students to experience real work situations, learn
new job skills, and make connections within the community for future employment.
3. All students are given instruction in basic Microsoft computer skills, thus preparing them
both for the job search as well as job responsibilities.
4. We provide all students instruction in creating/updating a resume, job search, and
interviewing skills in our career classes.
5. Our site coordinators and instructors encourage our students to pursue higher education
by providing access to local educational resources. We also have a GED tutoring program
which prepares our students who lack a high school diploma to take the GED exam. We
offer scholarships for taking the GED practice tests and the actual exam. We also offer
scholarships for our graduates to attend vocational training or college locally.
6. Bible study is one of the classes provided in our curriculum. Additionally, each student is
assigned a mentor who works with her one on one in Bible study and goal setting.
7. We have prioritized money in our budget to go toward advertising our services. Additionally,
we are expanding our network of partnerships with other helping agencies and service
providers to gain referrals.

1. Over 800 women have successfully completed our job readiness program.
2. We have increased the number of women served through our resource referral services, job-
readiness classes, mentoring program, continuing education classes, scholarship program,
car donation program, and career clothes closet.
3. We have made changes in our GED tutoring program curriculum in response to the changes in
the GED exam and are seeing a greater number of students pass the GED. We also provided
extended GED tutoring to those students who need more time preparing for the GED.
4. In the last three years, our graduates finding jobs within a year after beginning our program
ranged from 60% - 86%.
5. We would like to see a greater percentage of our participants find jobs with a livable wage.
6. We would like more of our graduates to enroll in higher education or vocational training.
7. We would like for our organization to have more name recognition in our community so that
more people view it as a resource, thus increasing our program enrollment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our volunteers,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Christian Womens Job Corps of Madison County Alabama Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Christian Womens Job Corps of Madison County Alabama Inc.

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. John Hearne

No Affiliation

Term: 2020 - 2021


Board co-chair

Joelene Vickers

Carole Chase

No Affiliation

Amelia Hatchett

No Affiliation

Rochelle Conley

Attorney

Linda Spalla

Joelene Vickers

Barbara Williams

Kim Cox

No Affiliation

Rashida Dore-Wilson

Alabama A&M University

Robert Rice

Pastor

Gordon Porter

No Affiliation

LaDonna McCann

Redstone Arsenal

Geoff Otieno

Dynetics

Toney Massey

U.S. Army

Donna Rogers

NASA

Sheree Kelley

Huntsville Utilities

John Hearne

Raymond James

Melanie Thornton

Huntsville/Madison Co. Public Library

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/06/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.