Renascence Inc.

The Home of Second Chances

Montgomery, AL   |  http://www.halfway-home.net

Mission

The mission of Renascence is to restore men released on parole by assisting them to successfully reintegrate into the community.

Ruling year info

2002

Program Manager

Ms. Susan Hunt

Main address

215 Clayton St

Montgomery, AL 36104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

63-1286067

NTEE code info

Neighborhood Center, Settlement House (P28)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Transitional Care, Half-Way House for Offenders/Ex-Offenders (I31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 8,500 men are released each year from the Alabama Department of Corrections. • Many do not have family or friends to support them in their re-entry. • Most have no job, few job skills, and no high school diploma. • Over 85% of them have a history of chemical dependency; 30% have physical or mental disabilities. How can they rebuild their lives and not fall back into bad habits, unless they have a place to stay that is stable, affordable, drug and alcohol free, and conducive to living responsibly? But there are very few such good home plans available to men paroling out in Alabama.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Half-way home for ex-offenders

Renascence provides men recently released on parole with stable, drug-free housing and a structured program that requires them to set goals, take action, and be accountable.
They receive food, clothing, support groups, and access to a variety of services. And communal living and responsibiliities. They are expected to find full-time employment and contribute to the program with chores and 25% of their income.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients engaged in the criminal justice system in the last 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Half-way home for ex-offenders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of residents who came to us each year on parole or probation from the Alabama Department of Corrections, or occasionally from a county jail.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Half-way home for ex-offenders

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the number of men each year who were employed at least part-time while they lived at Renascence. Some leave before finding steady work. Full-time at the DRC bars full-time employment.

Number of service recipients who have no past substance abuse

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Half-way home for ex-offenders

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

About 85 to 90% of men in prison have had substance abuse history--with drugs and/or alcohol.

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Half-way home for ex-offenders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Most apply for SNAP benefits early on. Some, numbered here, each year are referred and helped variously to medical, dental, or mental health services, or to employment, legal, or disability services.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Renascence is to restore men released on probation or parole by assisting them to successfully reintegrate into our community.

Renascence provides certain benefits and responsibilities for its residents.
Benefits:
• Safe housing, clothing, food, some transportation, supervision, recovery support groups, life skills training, and access to some
job opportunities and to a variety of services according to their specific needs.
• Communal living support and accountability.
• Effectiveness. Most graduates have remained out of prison.
Responsibilities:
• Attend full time the nearby Day Reporting Center of the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles or find full-time employment or a
full-time combination of work and education and volunteer service.
• Pay on child-support and victim’s compensation obligations and contribute 25% of employment or pension income to Renascence.
• Abide by all house rules, share in household chores, and support fellow residents with a positive attitude and example.
• Attend all house meetings and certain evening meals. There is a nightly curfew for all.

Renascence has provided over 370 men from all over the state with stable, drug-free, housing and a structured program that requires them to set goals, take action, and be accountable.

One of Renascence’s biggest challenges is the high cost of running a residential re-entry program.
• Modest salaries of our dedicated staff, payroll taxes, and health insurance (for full-timers) make up almost two thirds of our expenses.
We keep operating expenses to a minimum.
• Required insurances are extremely expensive, because of the population we serve.
• Utility bills are high for a large, old house with 12-14 residents cooking, showering, washing clothes, and keeping cool in summer
and warm in winter.
• Most foundation grants do not fund salaries, insurance, and utilities.

Funding each year has come largely from individual donors, area churches, and family foundations, supplemented by a few major foundation grants (e.g. The Daniel Foundation, the Central Alabama Community Foundation, etc.). We conduct a fall annual appeal. We also receive income from Charity Bingo and our spring community fundraiser, a recreational ping pong tournament.

In 2018, Renascence was one of only two providers in the state to win a contract with the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Paroles to provide halfway home services for parolees, up to ten at one time. In 2019 this contract has been almost fully implemented. This steady income makes a significant difference, though at its fullest extent it will not cover more than a quarter of our budget.

Currently we are making long-term investments in program services and maintenance:
• We have contracted professional services of the Montgomery Area Mental Health Authority to help provide case management,
individual testing, and mental health counseling. This should help the adaptation and retention of a good number of men.
• We have contracted and completed (2020) badly needed exterior repair and repainting of our big, old house, and we have raised most of
the required funds.

Our Board of Directors (currently 14 members) is competent and dedicated, representing a wide range of employment experience and skills and a wide range of years serving Renascence. We are recruiting new members for even greater diversity of age and gender and race.

Our staff leaders (House Supervisor, Administrative assistant) have proven effective over many years, and more recent hires at House Manager have been competent and reliable.

The fundraising committee over the last two years has developed grant writing skills and proficiency. In 2017 and 2018 we applied for several grants from federal, state, and foundation sources and were selected for five of them. Both the need for our services and our good track record in recent years have made Renascence a preferred provider for state and local pardons and parole agencies.

Our outreach efforts have been informing the public of the desirability of our halfway home -- and its rarity in Alabama. There is increasing understanding by all stakeholders of the societal and financial benefit of Renascence for the residents, the taxpayers, and the community in achieving productive citizens, reduced recidivism, and lower costs.

Since 2006, Renascence has provided over 350 men from all over the state with stable, affordable, drug-free housing and a structured program that requires them to set goals, take action, and be accountable. We know -- and law enforcement officials tell us -- that we are a key component in improving the lives of the men who come to us with almost no funds, usually limited skills, and often no family support.

Renascence benefits many people beyond the residents:
• The families of residents, by helping them reconnect in healthy, responsible ways;
• Employers, by providing them with workers who are sober, rested, fed, and supported;
• The Montgomery community, by providing a stable home and individual support for men who might otherwise be casting about;
• Alabama taxpayers, whom Renascence currently saves $17,692 per year for each man who would otherwise be in prison.
When we help our men, we help the larger society. Second chances are good business.

Our vision is to expand much more, as the need is great. The home we own is at capacity in terms of beds, so we hope to explore in coming years other options for expansion. For the immediate future, we want to make our existing program as strong as possible in every way so that our future expansion (undoubtedly requiring a capital campaign) will be smooth and successful.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Men who have been recently released from prison on probation or parole.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We implemented a new medicine (prescribed) retention and paperwork system. We won a grant to purchase bicycles to allow the residents to get to work more easily.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Their good feedback allows us to provide better services for our participants.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Renascence Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Renascence Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Joseph Crowley

Renascence, Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2022

Joe Crowley

Assoc. Prof., Auburn U Montg. retired

Douglass Porter

Episcopal Resource Center retired

Artegus Felder

USPS

Carlton Avery

Vance Law Firm

Ja'Taune Bosby

ACLU Alabama

James Bozeman

Robt E Lee HS retired

Laura Murdock

ADOC retired

John Pickens

Founder, Alabama Appleseed retired

Nelson Smith

Col. US Army retired

Carl Fisher

Gen. US Army Chaplain ret.

Ryan Beesley

Real Estate Agent RE/MAX

Vincent Hall

Community Engagement Liaison/Youth Advocate

Willie Miles

USPS, local minister

Lloyd Strickland

CPA

Keisha Favor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.