Homeless Animals Relief Project

Mission

Our mission is to reduce cat overpopulation and suffering by providing free or very low-cost animal birth control surgery to cats living with the poor, and feral cats. We promote community health with a 3 year rabies vaccination to every animal we fix, and we offer free or extremely low-cost care for basic feline injuries or illnesses. We currently focus on cats due to their explosive population growth, and because there are a number of well-funded dog rescues in the Mid-South improving the lives of unwanted or homeless canines. We turn away no one because of inability to pay; getting the pet fixed is our priority. We are proud to provide care to pets and feral cats who likely would never otherwise see a veterinarian or receive professional care in their lives.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are a tiny but mighty nonprofit improving feline heath and welfare through spay/neuter in rural north Mississippi. We've been at it since 1996 and have a proven track record of success in helping cats and their communities. We have no paid staff but manage to get hundreds of cats fixed every year at minimal cost.

Ruling year info

2000

Principal Officer

Linda Chitwood

Main address

PO Box 371

Senatobia, MS 38668 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

64-0925751

NTEE code info

Veterinary Services (D40)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2016, 2015 and 2014.
Register now

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Spay/Neuter of cats living with the poor

Free or very low cost birth control surgery is provided to pets living with low-income people. Most qualify because they are receiving public assistance, but others have special financial circumstances. Each case is evaluatated individually, and we err on the side of benefiting the animal and the community by offering spay/neuter to reduce animal overpopulation, increase the likelihood that the pet will be able to remain in the home, and improve our community's health.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

We administer a 3-year rabies vaccine to every cat we fix, if they are at least 3 months old. This improves community health and protects the cat against this rare but deadly disease.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Our veterinarians will provide free or very low-cost professional care to sick or injured cats living with the poor. Any injured or sick cat can be evaluated by our veterinarian for free, or a low-copay for qualified low-income owners. We will cover all or most the cost, much of which will be donated by the vet, if the cat is expected to survive the injury or illness. If the vet feels the cat is suffering and humane euthanasia would be the most compassionate choice, Homeless Animals Relief Project will cover that cost. If the cat survives, we do require spay/neuter before the cat is discharged to the owner. We do ask owners to pay what they can.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Annie Lee Roberts Courage and Compassion Award 2002

The Summerlee Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

Summerlee Foundation Courage & Compassion Award 2004

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the poor (people living well below federal poverty levels). We serve the working poor, people with low-paying jobs who don't qualify for federal or state help. We also serve the overwhelmed, such as people with unexpected expenses (such as having to take in grandchildren) who previously could have afforded veterinary care. We also have a number of elderly clients who had a cat show up at their home and who are willing to allow the cat to live there, but need help covering the $200-300 cost of a spay or neuter. We also help feral cat caregivers with getting their colonies of feral cats fixed.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), we call every client after their cat has surgery to check on the cat and ask how the process went,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have clients in a nearby county who just are often unable or unwilling to drive 30-50 miles to our usual veterinarians. We were able to convince a vet clinic in that county to join our network and offer a low cost spay/neuter to these clients. We also found that a lot of our elderly and poor clients either were physically unable to trap, confine, lift or carry their cat to a veterinary clinic, and the poor often either had no car or the car wouldn't make it 30-50 miles to our vets. We applied for and received a grant to cover the cost of getting a certified humane cat trapper to catch and transport cats for these clients.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback hasn't changed our relationship other than to improve it in most circumstances, because the overwhelming positive feedback buoys our resolve and helps us fine tune our program to get the most cats fixed the most efficient way possible.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Homeless Animals Relief Project
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Homeless Animals Relief Project

Board of directors
as of 2/24/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Linda Chitwood

Meg Ross

Denise Bynum

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/24/2022,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/24/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.