The Poverello Center Inc

aka Poverello   |   Wilton Manors, FL   |  www.poverello.org

Mission

The Poverello Center, Inc. provides nutritious food, services and basic living essentials with the highest degree of understanding, respect and love for individuals living with critical and chronic illnesses Including HIV, in South Florida.

Ruling year info

1988

CEO

Thomas S Pietrogallo

Main address

2056 N Dixie Hwy

Wilton Manors, FL 33305 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

65-0056218

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities (N30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Much chronic disease in our area is preventable through lifestyle changes like healthy eating and moderate exercise. Some disease is caused by simply not knowing how healthy eating and food preparation can assist our bodies to function at their optimal level. Other diseases are aided by healthy eating and food selection. Living more healthy days is acheivable by maximizing our ability to eat, live and be well.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Poverello Eat Well Center

The Poverello Eat Well Center is a healthy foods, participant choice food pantry that serves people with critical or chronic illnesses throughout South Florida.

Population(s) Served

The Poverello Live Well Center offers all program participants of the Poverello Center, free wellness services (Chiropractic, Reiki, Acupuncture, massage), full gym and hair care.

Population(s) Served

The Poverello Center, Inc.'s Be Well Program recognizes that people sometimes need help fully maximizing their health. Through cooking classes, nutritional counseling (one on one or group), tastings, Diabetes Prevention Program, educational programs, linkage to care programs, the staff and volunteers assist others to learn to maximize health.

Population(s) Served

The Poverello Center Inc. strives to help youth in poverty have enough to eat at times when school lunches aren't available. The hope is that food insecurity is lessened when kids have access to their own fresh fruits, vegetables and easy to prepare foods on the weekend. These "Fuel Packs" are curated by our nutritionist to meet the caloric needs of the ages of children served and are provided on Fridays to needy kids. We also support LGBT Youth in Miami who don't get enough to eat during the week.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Poverello Eat Well Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We aspire to ensure viral suppression among our 2700 clients with HIV, indicating successful HIV treatment and inability to pass along HIV infection by those who are virally suppressed.

Number of HIV-positive people who achieve or maintain an undetectable viral load

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Poverello Eat Well Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Viral load refers to the amount of HIV virus found (counted) in about a teaspoonfull of blood. The lower the viral count, the harder it is to contract HIV from the person living with HIV.

Number of clients living with HIV receiving assistance to access healthcare benefits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Poverello Be Well Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Percent of client population with HIV who are in Primary Care (at least one visit in the past year).

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Food Security for those experiencing critical or chronic illness.
Healthy food competency among the poor and increased levels of exercise for those at risk of chronic disease.
Getting people with chronic illness moving to exercise to their best ability.
Maximizing community volunteerism to provide for those who are most vulnerable.

Eat Well Center - is stocked with healthy food items curated by our onsite nutritionist to provide participants with many healthy choices. We also deploy our Pop Up Eat Well Center into areas of poverty and poor fresh foods access.

Live Well Center - provides a gym and wellness center featuring free programming like Reiki, Chiropractic, Massage, Haircuts and Acupuncture by our generous volunteer providers for any of our program participants.

Be Well Programming - Evidence Based strategies like Diabetes Prevention Programming, ARTAS and SBIRT.

With 38 part/full time employees and over 350 monthly volunteers, the Center is well suited to fulfill its mission.

We have implemented 100% Customer choice in all food programming, all items offered in our food pantry are healthy based upon nutrient, fat, and salt contents.

We need to replace our aging fleet of vehicles to expand our Popup Eat Well Center that goes into areas of poverty to distribute healthy groceries.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Clients reported not having knowledge of resources relating to mental health or substance abuse. The organization utilized the feedback in our needs assessment when seeking funding for new programming, a first of its kind screening for risk of depression and substance use in a food pantry, which was funded and implemented. Now 100% of clients are screened and receive information about available community resources.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

The Poverello Center Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Poverello Center Inc

Board of directors
as of 10/7/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jodi Reichman

Community Organizer

Term: 2015 - 2019

Mitch Bloom

Wells Fargo

Requel Lopes

Dragon Fly Wellness

JoAnne McCann

Independent Business Consultant

Jason Brown

Recruiting Consultant

Jay Feldman

Real Estate

Clark Wycoff

KPMG

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/06/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.