Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County, Inc.

Great Futures Start Here

aka Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County   |   Fort Pierce, FL   |  www.bgcofslc.org

Mission

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.

Ruling year info

1994

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. William Armstead

Main address

3104 Avenue J

Fort Pierce, FL 34947 USA

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EIN

65-0505369

NTEE code info

Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined) (O23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BGCA

BGCA clubs serve school-age youth through a variety of programs including homework assistance, technology centers, teen centers, career exploration, job assistance, sports and recreation, art classes and leadership development. In addition to program development, Boys & Girls Clubs of America provides programmatic and executive training for Club professionals nationwide.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Boys & Girls Clubs of St, Lucie County (BGCSLC) serves thousands of young people across the County. The Clubs offer daily access to a broad range of programs that promote health, social, educational, vocational, character, and leadership development. Club programs foster a sense of belonging, competence, usefulness and influence that builds self-confidence and self-esteem. The scope and depth of our programming addresses the community’s need of positive programs for these at risk youth. For example, SMART Moves teaches resistance skills when dealing with substance abuse, HIV/Aids, smoking and premature sexual activity. BGCSLC also operates specialized programs including truancy prevention.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Best Places to Work 2020

St. Lucie County Human Resources Association

Affiliations & memberships

Boys Girls Clubs of America CEO of the Year 2020

Boys & girls Clubs of America program of the Year 2019

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    For the past 27 years, our organization has provided a variety of youth development services to the young people of St. Lucie County. We now serve more than 4,000 registered members with before- and after-school programs in six neighborhood Clubhouses and 15 school-based Clubs and a number of summer camp locations. We also provide specialized services, including our A+ Attendance truancy prevention program, to thousands of children across the county every year. In all, we serve more than 15,000 young people every year. We serve a highly diverse population, but focus our attention on "those who need us most," as stated in our Mission. In fact, 99% of registered members receive free or reduced-cost lunch at school. Our Clubs are located in underserved neighborhoods.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To identify new geographic service areas, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    For several years we successfully partnered with local organizations, including CareerSource Research Coast and the county Economic Development Council, to offer summer workforce readiness programs. These programs offered teens the opportunity to learn skills that would help them gain employment Based on feedback from education officials and local agencies, it became clear that there was far more demand and more need than could be met with a summer-only program. We responded with "Into the Future," a year-round workforce readiness program that includes workforce readiness programs, tours of local employers, Social and Emotional Learning, financial literacy and leadership skills, as well as hands-on training. The first class began this summer.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The process of sharing feedback has strengthened our relationships with community partners and funders because they recognize that we are being transparent with them. Sharing information also has another important benefit; By doing so, we can work on strengthening our relationships with our partners. When that happens, they and we can work together to provide wraparound services for our children and thier families. This process already is happening with some of our partner agencies. Asking for feedback has improved our relationships with parents of our members because we know we've heard what they want for their children. It also improves parents' attitudes toward us, because they know we're listening to what they have to say.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 9/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Leslie Kristof

Campus President, Keiser University

Term: 2021 - 2022

William Armstead

CEO, Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County

Sean Baldwin

Retired Chief of Police, Fort Pierce, FL

Linda Bartz

St. Lucie County Board of County Commissioners

Jack Barrett

Retired Development Executive

Charles Cuono

Retired School principal

Richard Del Toro

Assistant Chief, Port St. Lucie Police Department

Douglas Farrell

President, DLF Media Consultants

Matthew Guettler

Guettler Brothers Construction

Brian Hester

Chief Deputy, St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office

DXiane Hobley-Burney

Chief of Police, City of Fort Pierce

Taylor Hoskins

Associate Attorney, Law Firm of Hoskins, Turco, Lloyd & lLoyd

Cecilia Jaimes

Commercial Lender, Vice President, CenterState Bank

Leslie Kristof

Campus President, Keiser University

Mike Lafreniere

Owner, Natures Grounds Landscape

George Landry

Interim Director of Public Utilities. St. Lucie County Board of County Commissioners

Genia Leonard

Community Volunteer

Dr. Martin Lesin

Retired Chiropractor

Angelique Lyons

Attorney, Costangy, Brooks & Smith & Prophete, LLP

Jay McBee

CPA, DiBartolomeo, McBee, Hartley & Barnes, P.A.

Dr. Kevin Perry

Assistant Auperintendent, St. Lucie Public Schools

Mike Piazza

Lum Wealth Management Group, Raymond James

Sarah Pride

Community Volunteer

Nate Spera

Chief, St. Lucie County Fire Department

Mark Tremblay

St. Lucie County Chamber of Commerce

Dr. Pamela Welmon

Educator

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.