Global Autism Project

Autism Knows No Borders, Fortunately Neither Do We.

Brooklyn, NY   |  www.globalautismproject.org

Mission

The Global Autism Project promotes the acceptance and integration of individuals with autism worldwide by training communities in culturally relevant, sustainable practices. We currently have partners in India, Kenya, Indonesia, China, Nigeria, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Tanzania, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, and Czech Republic. We have also previously worked in Ghana, Nicaragua, Netherlands and Peru. We aim to have 20 partners around the world by the year 2020.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Pandemic has provided a unique opportunity to create a program with even more impact in the world.

Ruling year info

2009

Founder/CEO

Mrs. Molly Ola Pinney

Main address

252 3rd Ave.

Brooklyn, NY 11215 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

65-1228586

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Due to the linguistic, cultural, and geographic barriers in under-resourced communities, outreach in autism services has been limited in the past. In these communities, caregivers are forced to rely on instinct instead of evidence based practices, creating systematic problems like ostracism, seclusion, shame and at times, abuse. Without proper treatment, children with autism are not able to reach their full potential and parents and instructors are left without hope.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

International Partnerships

We partner with existing centers around the world that are working to provide quality autism services to their communities. We train staff and teachers in evidence-based clinical practices as well as administration and outreach in order for their centers to be successful. Additionally, we help run community and parent workshops to increase awareness and understanding of autism. Our model of sustainability means that our teaching methods allow our partners to then be able to teach and disseminate knowledge within their communities.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
People with disabilities

Our SkillCorps program is a volunteer travel program for anyone with personal or professional experience with autism, inclusing self-advocates. Applicants are interviewed and selected to be on teams of 8-12 . These teams then travel to our partner sites to deliver on the ground training to the staff and teachers at their centers. This program contributes to the ongoing training that we provide to our partners as well as giving these volunteers an experience of understanding the work of autism service provision in other communities and cultures.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

We offer information and resources on autism and behavior analysis in multiple languages so that anyone around the world can access them. We also offer online courses to help those looking to become certified to bring autism services to their community.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

RAISE (or Real Advancement, Independence, Social Skills, and Empowerment) is an adult employment program at our headquarters in New York City. We employ 3 adults with autism, training them in job skills that are generalizable and transferrable. This program has been put on hold since the start of the COVID-19 Pandemic. We look forward to being able to bring it back.

Population(s) Served

Leadership Academy is a six week online training program that trains and develops participants in leadership, communication and other skills that allow them to deal powerfully with life and circumstances. We have had over 200 participants in leadership academy from around the globe.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Honorary Degree 2019

Columbia University

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

SkillCorps

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization seeks to create a world where all autistic people are accepted and appreciated by their communities worldwide.

The organization’s long-term strategic plan involves three major components: 1) geographic expansion, 2) independent sustainability and local impact of our current partner sites, and 3) further development of a sustainable, empirically-based model. These are outlined below:

1. Geographic expansion: In addition to our current partners, the Global Autism Project is constantly looking to create impact in new geographic regions by establishing new partnerships. Our dedication to seeking out committed and engaged partners is reflected in the literature on our website geared toward new potential partners, as well as a developed system of “partnership guideposts” to help establish new partnerships. The main qualities that we look for in partners are leadership, social impact, replicability, sustainability, and values. By designing a system in which we are constantly open to new partners, we limit the necessity to recruit future partners, and increase the likelihood that partners who find us are committed to the success of the partnership. This system has successfully worked for establishing all of our present partnerships.

2. Independent sustainability and local impact of our current partner sites: Each partnership is designed to be 5-7 years in length, with the goal being that at the end of the partnership, the partner site will be able to exist independently with a sustainable local impact. For all partnerships it should include independent financial stability, adequate facilities for service provision, independent ethical practice in behavior analysis and clinical practice for children with autism, independent ability to train internal staff in evidence-based practices for autism treatment, independent ability to develop, maintain, and advance curricula as needed, and independent ability to seek out additional resources and support as needed (preferably within their own country, if they exist).

3. Further development of a sustainable, empirically-based model: Ultimately, the model of the Global Autism Project should be structured such that its sustainability is not dependent on contextual or individual factors and is independently replicable as a program. To accomplish this goal, the Global Autism Project is currently working on writing systematic program documents with a goal of publication. Currently, this includes a document of structured “guideposts” for partners, outlining the process of becoming a partner and the objective measures required at each phase. Additionally, the Global Autism Project has produced a seven-domain program evaluation tool called the Site Assessment Survey for Sustainable Intervention (SASSI), designed to assess autism centers at their baseline and measure change over time. The Global Autism Project is currently conducting pilot studies to establish the reliability and validity of the evaluation, again, with a goal of developing an empirically-based tool that can be copyrighted and published.

By beginning in larger communities and encouraging further dissemination, we ensure that the training provided is accessible and culturally appropriate. By training in not only treatment for autism but advocacy and awareness for individuals with autism, we will build a systematic and growing movement towards full inclusion and acceptance - abolishing the instinct-based treatment and ostracism, abuse, and seclusion of individuals with autism.

We have expanded to 13 partner sites and continue to expand that number, reaching a further and more global audience.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our organization serves the international autistic community and their families, educators, therapists and caregivers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In late 2108, our organization received feedback from partners that they would appreciate the opportunity to interact more with and learn from each other, in addition to learning from SkillCorps® members. In early 2019 we announced our regional and global summits where they had the opportunity to do just that. Regional summits were held in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Europe for all of our partners to connect and work together. In additional, a global summit was held in Bali, Indonesia where all of our partners and a select group of past volunteers came together to learn from each other, participate in trainings and to network. During the COVID Pandemic, our partners met with each other weekly and had several smaller working groups to address specific challenges.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Global Autism Project was, from its inception predicated on the idea that the local partners we work with globally know best. They best know their communities, their needs and what will sustain. We use a model of doing with and not for, believing deeply that when we do for others, we remove their agency and independence. As a result, feedback has not typically shifted the power as the power and direction of our work has always been driven by our local partners.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Global Autism Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Global Autism Project

Board of directors
as of 1/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Fatema Hamdani

Nundiah Edwards

Joseph Cuello

Fatema Hamdani

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.