HOMEWARD BOUND OF MARIN

Ending Homelessness with Training, Housing and Hope

aka Homeward Bound   |   Novato, CA   |  https://hbofm.org/

Mission

Founded in 1974, Homeward Bound of Marin strives to end homelessness in our community with training, housing and hope. Our programs range from emergency shelter to permanent supportive housing for families and individuals, combined with services like counseling and job training that help residents build a sustainable, independent future. We also operate several social enterprise businesses, including production of Wagster Treats dog biscuits and The Key Room event venue, that offer hands-on work experience to students and graduates while earning revenue to support our programs. Homeward Bound has maintained services during the pandemic while operating new shelters in local motels for homeless families and adults needing refuge, as well as preparing meals for vulnerable seniors.

Ruling year info

1984

Co-Chief Executive Officer

Mary Kay Sweeney

Co-Chief Executive Officer

Paul Fordham

Main address

1385 N. Hamilton Parkway

Novato, CA 94949 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0011405

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homeward Bound of Marin works to solve homelessness in a county ranked as one of the most expensive rental markets in the United States. The contrast between cost of housing and low wages from entry-level jobs leaves low-income individuals and families, increasingly including seniors, in extremely precarious circumstances. Our programs seek to end homelessness with training, housing and hope, offering wraparound services and job training with an emphasis on creating new long-term supportive housing options to build an inclusive community. By partnering with other organizations, ranging from the Department of Veterans Affairs to local congregations, Homeward Bound has succeeded in creating services that help our residents build success and achieve their housing goals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Homeward Bound of Marin

Homeward Bound operates 16 inter-related residential programs offering more than 500 beds for families, single adults and people facing persistent mental illness. Services range from emergency shelter to permanent supportive housing serving veterans, seniors, families in transition, adults facing mental health challenges and others working their way out of homelessness. In 2022, Homeward Bound opened two new programs to provide permanent supportive housing for 50 more vulnerable adults. A new community for 24 unhoused veterans received final project approvals in August, with groundbreaking set for November. After a pandemic pause, we relaunched Fresh Starts Culinary Academy with hands-on employment training and reopened The Key Room, our onsite event and catering venue that offers supportive employment to graduates. Another social enterprise venture, Fresh Starts Chef Events, returns in November and Wagster Treats, which makes premium dog biscuits, also is poised to grow.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Jonathan's Place held its grand opening in August as our new site for year-round shelter services for adults. Homeward Bound has operated a shelter at the site since 1986. The new program offers a modern, efficient shelter for 40+ adults with support from round-the-clock staff who offer compassionate case management and other housing-focused services, meals, access to laundry and computer stations. The new building offers an additional 32 units of permanent supportive housing on two upper floors to fulfill dreams of home for adults who have endured lengthy episodes without housing stability. Tenants will pay affordable rents for single-room units with each floor sharing a kitchen, community room and restrooms. Partners from the county's Behavioral Health & Recovery Services also will have office hours onsite to support participants in this program.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Family Center, founded in 1974, offers nine rooms for homeless families as the county's only year-round emergency shelter for families. The site includes two kitchens, a shared playroom and living rooms, a communal dining area and backyard as well as homework/computer learning area. On-site staff members support families as they regain stability by helping them access childcare, seek job and housing options, evaluate education pathways, and build resilience for the future. Homeward Bound also operates seven supportive housing programs for parents and children, serving a total of 252 people in families last year. During the pandemic, we received state funding to expand services to 10 more families using housing vouchers paired with case management. Our staff provides wraparound support for participants as they work through housing applications and pursue other goals.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

New Beginnings Center offers 80 beds for men and women in a housing-focused shelter program. Services include counseling, workshops on "life skills" like credit repair or budgeting, access to job training in our Fresh Starts Culinary Academy or through apprenticeship with our building maintenance team. The program includes 12 beds reserved for veterans in a partnership with the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

This job-training program for homeless or low-income adults is certified by the American Culinary Federation. The intensive 10-week training program includes work in Homeward Bound kitchens to help students build skills for employment in the busy culinary sector. Students also receive training in "life skills" like teamwork and conflict resolution as well as financial management.
As the pandemic waned, the training program reopened to new students. Recent graduates found wages on the rise for skilled kitchen positions, receiving an average starting wage of $21.82 per hour, up 18% from the previous year. The Jacques Pépin Foundation honored an April graduate, Sarah Wolf, with the 2022 Gloria Pépin Memorial Grant of $5,000 to continue her culinary studies. Sarah, who hopes to work in a community-serving kitchen, was chosen among female graduates from all programs supported by the foundation.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Housed in a historic former hotel, the Voyager Carmel Center provides a home for 36 adults struggling with mental illness, with 10 rooms reserved for emergency shelter services and 26 rooms for long-term supportive housing. Services include 24-hour staff, community activities like art workshops and barbecues, and support to enhance individual strengths.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
People with psychosocial disabilities

Oma Village offers permanent supportive housing for 14 families who have experienced homelessness. Opened in 2017, this community provides modern, energy-efficient apartments arranged around a central courtyard with access to a shared community room and playground. Onsite staff supports residents as needed as they rebuild their independence and put down roots in the community. As the pandemic waned, community activities have returned in person, including regular art workshops and a back-to-school barbecue.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

This program for 12 formerly homeless seniors occupies a former convent refurbished to offer permanent supportive housing with individual bedrooms plus shared dining room, living room, laundry, kitchen and backyard. Onsite staff supports residents as needed to maintain their stability and independence with referrals to transportation assistance, medical services or other community programs. Opened in 2018, this program has built strong partnerships with local supporters who offer activities like trishaw rides (Cycling Without Age), art workshops and yoga.

Population(s) Served

In May, Homeward Bound of Marin celebrated the opening of a new permanent supportive housing program for 18 adults who have experienced chronic homelessness. The program that occupies a former motel was the first in Marin County opened with support from the state's Project Homekey. Tenants in this program pay affordable rents for studio apartments, while onsite staff provides support to build resilience and thrive in our community. Homeward Bound delivers a nightly meal.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Seniors
Homeless people
Seniors

Where we work

Accreditations

American Culinary Federation Education Foundation 2015

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year 2013

North Bay Bohemian

Heart of Marin Award for Innovation 2015

Center for Nonprofit and Volunteer Leadership

Quality Program - Fresh Starts Culinary Academy 2015

American Culinary Federation

Heart of Marin Award for Achievement in Nonprofit Excellence 2018

Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership

Nonprofit Leadership Award 2020

North Bay Business Journal

Affiliations & memberships

Catalyst Kitchens - Model Member 2015

Built for Zero - Collaborative Member 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who retain permanent supportive housing for 6 months or more.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prior to 2020, the number did not include 60 participants at Warner Creek Senior Housing.

Number of participants aged 62 years or older.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of residents who exit our programs for a housing opportunity.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of participants in communal housing programs declined in 2020 and 2021 due to COVID-19.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Homeward Bound of Marin operates on a mission of "opening doors to safety, dignity, hope and independence." To that end, the organization offers not only emergency shelter but transitional and permanent supportive housing, plus counseling, job training, referrals to community services as needed and wraparound supports. Our services aim to empower our residents to fulfill their potential and develop a self-sustaining future.

Our strategies focus on ending homelessness for each person served, respecting their unique needs and circumstances. Our programs offer intensive support for job and housing search, counseling and "life skills" workshops in subjects like budgeting and credit repair. Fresh Starts Culinary Academy, our 10-week job training program, helps individuals build employment skills that lead to living-wage jobs with career potential. With community support, we are creating new options for long-term supportive housing to serve families, seniors, veterans and others working their way out of homelessness.

Homeward Bound of Marin operates 18 inter-related programs ranging from emergency shelter to permanent supportive housing, allowing residents to benefit from an extensive range of services and transition to a growing independence with ongoing options to reach out for support. Along with culinary training, we offer apprenticeships in gardening/landscaping and building maintenance. We have a long history of partnership with other agencies to accomplish our shared goals, including participation in the Homeless Outreach Team and "coordinated entry" system that joins leadership from several organizations to identify, track and assist people in need of housing, then prioritize the most vulnerable individuals for assistance. This partnership approach resulted in a 28% drop in chronically homeless individuals from 2017 to 2019 as recorded through the biannual Point in Time Count of people experiencing homelessness in Marin County. We have begun construction of a rebuilt emergency shelter with 32 additional units of permanent supportive housing in San Rafael. Homeward Bound expects to complete this project in fall 2022. We also have begun planning a second project to provide 50 units of workforce and veteran housing adjacent to our headquarters site in Novato, Calif. Work could begin in 2022 on the first phase of that project with 24 small apartments for unhoused veterans.

Since 1974, Homeward Bound of Marin has refined and expanded programs to become Marin County's primary provider of shelter, housing and supportive services for homeless families and adults. We completed the Next Key Center in 2008, offering 32 studio apartments and an expanded training kitchen as well as event venue for public rental plus new administrative offices. In 2016, we opened the doors at Oma Village, a community of 14 low-cost rental homes for families transitioning out of homelessness. In 2018, we completed King Street Senior Housing, turning a former convent into a long-term supportive housing program for 12 seniors who have experienced homelessness. In 2020, Homeward Bound began work on a project to rebuild Mill Street Center, our emergency shelter for adults, and add 32 supportive housing units to the site. Homeward Bound continues to move forward with plans to develop a site adjacent to our headquarters with 50 units of supportive housing. This project received $4 million in funding in the 2021 California state budget.

During the pandemic, all programs at Homeward Bound remained operational. Our staff partnered with the County of Marin to operate emergency motel shelters for homeless families and adults. When the state's Project Homekey funding allowed the County of Marin to purchase an office building for conversion to housing, Homeward Bound became a partner to open a temporary shelter at the site while construction of a new emergency shelter is under way. We added a new "housing first" program in July 2021 to connect 10 more families with housing options and provide case management.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Homeward Bound of Marin serves families and individuals experiencing homelessness in Marin County, Calif. All are very low to extremely low income. In the year ending June 30, 2022, 66% of our program participants were 62 years of age or older while 14% were under 18 years old. They include people across the racial and ethnic spectrum, of all genders, and with a varying history of insecure housing. Our programs include services for parents with children, veterans, seniors, people with mental health challenges and individuals who have experienced prolonged periods of homelessness. Our staff also includes people with lived experience of homelessness.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

HOMEWARD BOUND OF MARIN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HOMEWARD BOUND OF MARIN

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Puett

Retired

Sonia Seeman

Retired

Dianne Snedaker

Retired

Carla Kovack

Prioress General, Dominican Sisters of San Rafael

Nancy Culhane

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Elvira Echevarria

Vice President of Development, SafetyChain Software

Anita Roehrick

Author, Visual Artist and Storyteller

Liz Saint John

Radio Broadcaster, KCBS

Lynes Downing

Entrepreneur

David Smith

Retired

Sheri Joseph

Tamalpais Pacific Foundation

Tony Nethercutt

Retired

Marion Weinreb

Retired

Nicole Bartolini

Medical Social Worker

Cynthia Williams

Community Engagement Liaison, Center for Domestic Peace

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/14/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.