Plumas Corporation

aka PLUMAS CORP   |   Quincy, CA   |  http://www.plumascorporation.org

Mission

Plumas Corporation is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation, whose mission is to promote the benefits of good land stewardship through education and restoration activities that result in healthy forests, resilient watersheds, and prosperous communities.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Jim G Wilcox

Main address

PO Box 3880

Quincy, CA 95971 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0016418

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Forest Conservation (C36)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Watershed Restoration

Provide technical and financial resources for private landowners and public lands management agencies engaged in watershed management. Principally, these activities include stream, meadow, and forest restoration in the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade mountains of California. The activities are primarily focused on restoring watershed function of degraded landscapes to create more resilient landscapes and fire-adapted safe communities, and improve stream flow, water quality, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife habitats, agricultural production and carbon sequestration.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Watershed Excellence Award 2014

Sacramento river Watershed Program

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Acres of wetlands flooded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Farmers, Researchers

Related Program

Watershed Restoration

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Researchers, Farmers

Related Program

Watershed Restoration

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Watershed Restoration

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Acres of forestland thinned or excess fuel removed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Researchers, Farmers

Related Program

Watershed Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

There is no coherent plan guiding public/private investment in natural resource infrastructure management issues of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade mountain region of California. Public investment funds are typically allocated based on the current political crisis; improving water conditions during drought or forest health/fuel reduction after catastrophic fires such as 2018 & 2020. Due to many factors, regional communities have lost much of the resource management infrastructure necessary to develop and effectively implement the types projects sought in these "crisis" funding cycles. No business can sustainably invest in equipment, facilities, and human talent on 3-year grant contracts driven by reactive crisis management. Recent active private investment in natural resource restoration, while admirable, is often seeking projects with the highest direct return on ecosystem services; again without investing in the project development queue.

There has been a short-sighted lack of interest in investing in long-term capacity for project development to ensure a sustainable stream of projects and adequate capacity of trained community workforce to implement these projects. To achieve these objectives requires several decades of consistent investment to rebuild community infrastructure and knowledge. The only sustainable solution to the water, carbon, wildlife and fire issues in the region is to invest in the regions communities, who have the highest vested interest in a sustainable natural and human environment.

Plumas Corporation's goals are to assist community stakeholders in developing the expertise to identify, develop and implement their projects in their backyards. Currently a handful of NGO's are conducting this work for said stakeholders by traveling around the region. There are too few NGO's and too many projects for this to be the ultimate solution. Let us help others to do, not do for others. Specifically, Plumas Corporation is seeking every opportunity to nurture and incubate local capability and capacity in communities throughout the region. While seeking those opportunities, Plumas is directly implementing forest and watershed restoration projects as 'example' projects to further stoke local interest in these restoration activities.

Plumas Corporation maintains a full suite of projects to the extent of our own capacity almost entirely through word-of-mouth referrals. We maintain close communication with our partner NGO's in the region to strategize how best to allocate our collective resources to meet immediate project demands while operating strategically. Once engaged with stakeholders and decision makers on individual projects, Plumas Corp senior management and individual project managers are regularly reaching out to local groups and individuals to participate in more hands-on activities, such as monitoring and re-vegetation work, to build more community familiarity with these projects and outcomes.

Plumas Corporation is also incubating/supporting several National Forest or watershed-based groups to tackle both watershed and forest health/fuel reduction projects. Plumas Corporation's unique niche is as an implementation focused organization. While we undertake technology transfer, we are concurrently assisting public & private landowners in developing, funding and directly implementing watershed restoration projects, especially montane meadows. Montane meadows are nature's reservoirs, slowing and retaining winter and spring runoff for release to streams later in the region's dry season, May to October. While performing this crucial role, the presence of that water provides a lush vegetative community that sequesters carbon, provides critical wildlife habitat and improves land productivity. Coupling meadow restoration with forest health/fuel reduction projects establishes a seamless fire resilient landscape, where fire can resume its natural role, while local and regional communities can reap the ecosystem service benefits of part of sustainable landscapes.

Plumas Corporation has two senior management positions; an Executive Director (ED) and a Chief Administrative Officer CCAO). Also, both the ED and CAO each carry a suite of projects to manage. In addition, the organization supports four project managers for stream and meadow restoration projects. Each project manager handles a suite of 4-6 projects in varying levels of development and implementation. The forest health and fuel reduction projects are guided by three project managers, supported by two Fellow-level staff. Ancillary local projects within Plumas County, a County Chipping Program and a Senior & Disabled Defensible Space program, are managed by seasonal managers. All of the above are supported by a full-time Administrative Assistant/Office Manager.

Plumas Corporation has been developing this structure and expertise since 1987, beginning with one project manager and one program coordinator. The organization gradually built its internal capacity as projects were identified, developed and funding resources became available. Currently, the watershed staff are managing 23 active projects from Lassen County in the north to Kern County in the south. Forest health staff are managing 9 projects, predominately in Plumas and Mono counties.

In that time, the organization has implemented over 85 watershed projects restoring over 5,200 acres of meadow floodplain, throughout the Sierra Nevada range. The forest health and fuel reduction program has implemented over 130 projects totaling over 13,000 acres of wildland urban interface (WUI) zones and public and private forestlands, mostly in Plumas County.

Additionally, Plumas Corporation has mentored three meadow restoration practitioners, one at the Tahoe National Forest and one with the Pit River Resource Conservation District (RCD). Both are now also working throughout the Sierra in support of the larger region. Plumas Corporation is currently incubating a nascent NGO in the eastern Sierra Nevada that will be implementing fuel reduction and forest health projects in the Inyo National Forest in Mono County, Ca.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    All staff regularly seek feedback from partners/clients on individual and organizational performance,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As programs and projects expanded, staff committments were becoming difficult to track. A partner suggested using a single electronic organizational calendar accesible by all staff fromany device, anywhere. It has greatly reduced confusion and missed committments.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, other partners as appropriate,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Plumas Corporation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Plumas Corporation

Board of directors
as of 7/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Kolb

retired engineer

Term: 2019 - 2021

Terry Benoit

retired federal hydrologist

Michael Jackson

retired attorney

John Sheehan

retired executive

Donna Lindquist

environmental consultant

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/29/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.