PLATINUM2023

INTERFAITH FOOD MINISTRY OF NEVADA COUNTY

Feeding Families, Fueling Hope

aka IFM   |   Grass Valley, CA   |  www.interfaithfoodministry.org

Mission

A community where no one should feel the hurt of hunger. Interfaith Food Ministry feeds the hungry and works to reduce food Insecurity In Nevada County, California. We help to sustain health, human dignity and the opportunity for individuals to realize their full potential.

Notes from the nonprofit

FUELING HOPE New families continue to register with Interfaith Food Ministry each day. The IFM Board is not only committed to ensuring that all those suffering from food insecurity in Nevada County have access to food but is also committed to providing more nutritional food. Donations are vital to meeting our goal. 80% of all funding come from individual donations of less than $150.00. Contributions of nonperishable food or home grown produce are always welcome. Volunteers to assist food distribution are also necessary to continue our mission. Sponsoring or participating in a food drive or fundraiser is a good way for schools and organizations to support IFM. Community support enables IFM to continue as an effective resource for our neighbors in need. “With two hungry young boys at home, our food seems to go so quickly. I deeply appreciate the loving effort of all the volunteers who help & the selfless donations of many here in our community!” IFM Client

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Mr. Phil Alonso

Development Director

Ms. Naomi Cabral

Main address

440 Henderson Street

Grass Valley, CA 95945 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0112585

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Interfaith Food Ministry works to reduce food insecurity in Western Nevada County. We feed the hungry, helping to sustain good health and human dignity. IFM provides food distributions Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to over 8000 clients per year. We typically serve approximately 1300+ low income food insecure people each week.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Interfaith Food Ministry

Interfaith Food Ministry (IFM) uses monetary and food donations to collect, package and distribute bags of food to registered families on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of every week. IFM serves special need families for gluten free diets, diabetics, vegetarian, and food bundles not requiring a stove or oven to prepare meals.
The following activities support food distribution:
1. Food Gleaning - Every morning volunteers collect food from local grocery stores, churches and farmers' markets.
2. Gardening - volunteers harvest a donated plot of land to provide fresh fruits and vegetables.
3. Grant writing - volunteers seek grants to expand purchasing power of protein and nutritional food.
4. Food Drives - IFM collaborates with local organizations to collect food for distribution.
5. Fundraisers - Throughout the year IfM sponsors fundraising activities to expand purchasing power.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

IFM provides classes to clients on how to cook a nutritional meal and then we provide clients with the ingredients to recreate the meal at home.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Twice monthly, representatives of the CalFresh program come to educate and enroll IFM clients to the S.N.A.P (Food Stamp) program

Population(s) Served
Adults

Working with local non-profit Sierra Harvest to reach the goal of distributing 25% locally grown food to food-insecure clients (within 20 mile radius) by the year 2020.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Working to keep an ongoing recruitment of volunteers to carry out our mission with open houses, open calls, training mixers, and work experience incentives.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year 2018

California Association of Nonprofits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Families

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Food gleaned from local grocery stores and farms varies depending on availability. The method for determining value was changed in 2017 from value of food to pounds.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents, Adults, Seniors

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Local homelessness is on the rise according to our local homeless service agencies. Up by 50% since 2019 and growing still.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Children and youth

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we had an increase of unemployment in our community due to covid. In 2019 the average income of our clients was $11,000. Unemployment is on the rise.

Number of clients who report that services/supports are available when needed, even in a crisis

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Families

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we served over 11K individuals during the pandemic. In 2019 we had an increase to our total number of clients, mostly due to job loss and lack of employment.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed/maintained healthy eating habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Nutritional Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we opened 3 high school pantries that enabled us to give out healthy groceries and produce to over 1000 kids and their families.

Number of snacks served for students participating in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we provided an exponential amount of snacks for kids and their families during the pandemic.

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we saw a significant increase in need during the pandemic when many lost work in our community.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Families

Related Program

Interfaith Food Ministry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 was a significant hike in meals served due to the effects of the pandemic. Meals are based on the groceries provided to clients.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Interfaith Food Ministry's primary objective is the efficient distribution of food to those who are hungry. Our vision is that Nevada County is a community where no one should feel the hurt of hunger. Our goal is to ensure that IFM maintains the food, funds, and volunteers necessary to consistently provide nutritious food to all who experience occasional, or chronic food insecurity due to unforeseen expenses, rising food prices or low wages.

Members of the IFM Executive Board work with committees within the organization to obtain and analyze information to make forward looking assumptions (operationally and financially). A preliminary plan is shared at a board meeting near the end of the current year to obtain board member input. The final plan which incorporates current year accomplishments and highlights, financial reporting and key measurements, updates to strategic plans, a new budget and operations plan are presented at the annual meeting which usually takes place in January of each year. The IFM annual meeting is open to the public and meeting presentations are available on the IFM website.

Food is distributed every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. Families receive staples once a month and perishables every two weeks. A local address is required as well as a social security number for each family member. No one is excluded on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, age, ethnicity, or religious belief.

IFM works to provide supplemental food through low cost bulk purchasing program and is also very fortunate to be supported with in-kind food donations from our food vendors, local gardens and even an IFM garden.

Funding is always challenging, but IFM has managed, through diligent fundraising, grant writing, and cultivation of donors, to keep up with incredible growth in the last 3 years (an average of 10% annually). However, in supporting the rapid growth of clients, IFM has not been able to increase protein or go in-depth with nutritional needs for clients. Fundraisers and Food-raisers for 2016 include but are not limited to:
- Solar e-Campaign
- Matching Campaign
- Shred Day
- Paulette's Spaghetti Dinner
- US Postal Food Drive
- Safeway Prepackaged Bag Sale
- Raley's Food for Families Holiday Food Donation
- IFM Holiday Meal Campaign
- Holiday Market Food Drive

Please note that while our cash position at the end of 2015 looks healthy, IFM has contracted to have solar installed which will consume approximately $85,000.00. The solar project will save IFM an average of $7,000.00 per year which will go directly toward the purchase of food (solar panel life expectancy of at least 25 years). Once solar project funds are spent, IFM will be back within good business practice of having 3 - 6 months of cash available (we budget each year for 4.5 months). This practice ensures our program viability.

Fundraising, food-raising and careful planning and budgeting does not occur without dedicated volunteers. IFM is sponsored by 15 member congregations. Volunteers are recruited through the member congregations. Member congregations appoint a volunteer coordinator to:
- recruit volunteers for IFM as needed;
- communicate relevant IFM information to their member congregations,
- advocate for funding, volunteers and generally for IFM in their member
congregations and the community at large; and participate in IFM activities.

IFM makes a huge impact in the community for low-income individuals and families. Specifically, IFM provides greater food knowledge, greater access to nutritional food, better health and the reduction of the stress related to balancing insufficient funds to live and eat, while not falling into homelessness.

In 2015, IFM provided food to 8,013 unduplicated people. The average annual income of our clients is $11,856 or $988/month for a family size of 2.5. IFM conservatively provides $200/month in food to clients; this represents 20% of their budget although recent client survey input indicates that 50-80% of their food each month is provided by IFM.

Along with shelter, food made available by IFM provides a stabilizing element for families. Tammy, an unemployed IFM client, articulates the stressful balancing act low-income individual/families face, "I have to make choices. Sometimes it ends up being a choice between gas for the car, or food. Gas usually wins out because it gets me to job interviews."

The IFM Board approved a Nutrition Policy on March 22, 2016 and is striving to provide the most nutritious and healthful food possible. This in turn will lead to better overall health and fewer people being in jeopardy of falling into homelessness. With the new Nutrition Policy, IFM is concentrating on procuring more lean proteins, fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly more colorful and nutrient-dense varieties. IFM's goal is to increase produce and protein provided to each client.

Although IFM serves a large number of clients, transportation issues prevent some clients from access to IFM's resources. IFM wants to ensure that all possible clients have access to food resources.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

INTERFAITH FOOD MINISTRY OF NEVADA COUNTY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INTERFAITH FOOD MINISTRY OF NEVADA COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 06/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert Thurman

Retired

Gaye Rogers

Grace Lutheran

Hilary Dart

Sierra Center for Spiritual Living

Judi Wade

Twin Cities Church

Diane Chang

Seventh Day Adventist

Joan Denzler

Sierra Pines Methodist

Debi Johnson

First Baptist Church

Cheri Eckholt

Grass Valley United Methodist

Nancy Koring

Saint Patrick's Catholic Church

Jeff Hebert

Saint Canice Catholic Church

Janet Kelley

Christian Science Church

Anne Lyon

Unitarian Universalist

Marnie Ratkofsky

Emmanuel Episcopal

James Schroeder

Peace Lutheran

Pam Sufleski

Sierra Presbyterian

Rick Kahil

John Brusher

Karen Holt

Maxine Palmer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.