Assistance League® of Greater Placer

Transforming Lives • Strengthening Community

Mission

Transforming the lives of children and adults through community programs

Notes from the nonprofit

Assistance League of Greater Placer is a nonprofit organization, with the mission of transforming lives and strengthening community. We care. We act. We are an all-volunteer organization, working year-round, with no paid staff. Our unique base of 214 members works with other public, private and philanthropic organizations to help mitigate the identified needs of our community’s most disadvantaged. In the last fiscal year, our volunteers: • Provided 1,752 children with new clothing and shoes • Delivered backpacks, school supplies, and dictionaries to 1,678 school children • Supplied 1,760 teddy bears to hospitals and California Highway Patrol • Provided 484 hours of life skills classes for 30 students • Awarded over $19,763 for community college scholarships • Helped 57 recipients with unforeseen emergency needs • Provided 37 people with clothing to re-enter the workforce

Ruling year info

1987

President

Joanne Kutzman

President-Elect

Katie Smith

Main address

P.O. Box 4693

Auburn, CA 95604 USA

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Formerly known as

Assistance League of Auburn Foothills

EIN

68-0119738

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Operation School Bell®

Operation School Bell started in our chapter in 1992 and is our chapter’s signature program, serving public school children in need ranging from Kindergarten through 12th grade within Greater Placer communities. We provide new school clothing and shoes for children referred by schools. Our shopping days are at times when parents can participate, with the goal of creating a positive, family-focused shopping experience so that all children can arrive at school with a newfound confidence and excited to learn.

Additionally, we provide student supply kits for children whose families cannot afford them. The kits match the supplies requested by teachers at the beginning of the year.

The program includes "Kids on the Block®", an educational puppet program performed in elementary schools to help children learn about bullying, school safety and learning disabilities in a safe, non-confrontation setting.

Our members also provide tutoring in elementary grades.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The Community Assistance Program provides services on a one-time basis to those experiencing an immediate need.  This program allows Assistance League to respond with financial assistance to purchase goods or services in a crisis situation.  Each request is considered on an individual basis. Services provided are varied and depend upon specific needs and available funds.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Job seeking clients are referred to Assistance League by local contracted job-training agencies. Beyond providing a new job-appropriate wardrobe, we coach our clients in how to create a versatile wardrobe within a budget, selecting colors and styles best suited to enhance their image and confidence. We work individually with clients to show them how to interchange articles of clothing to create the illusion of an expansive wardrobe appropriate for the workplace. Clients leave, not only with clothing, but also with a newfound confidence in themselves and prepared for both job interviews and the workplace.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Unemployed people

Through the Angels for Aging Program, Assistance League members provide visits, gifts and cards to long term residents of a skilled nursing facility. Members also host summer picnics and holiday parties. Most of the residents lack family and visitors, so our members provide the necessary social interaction that helps health and quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

The Scholarship Program was established in 2004. The program is unique, providing ongoing scholarships and ongoing mentoring for former at-risk students graduating with a 2.0 GPA from alternative or court-ordered high schools. These are students who have typically slipped through one safety net after another, but have managed to turn their lives around. Many are on their own and just need a bit of support ~ always financial and sometimes in need of mentoring or tutoring that Assistance League members also provide.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Best of the Best Thrift Shop 2010

Auburn Journal

Commendation for Competencies for Independent Living Program 2009

Placer County Office of Education

Best of the Best Non-Profit 2013

Auburn Journal

Best of the Best Thrift Shop 2016

Auburn Journal

Certificate of Recognition: Dressing for Success 2016

Placer County Employment Services & Business Advantage Network

Best of the Best Non-Profit 2013

Auburn Journal

Commendation for Competencies for Independent Living Program 2009

Placer County Office of Education

Best of the Best Thrift Shop 2010

Auburn Journal

Best of the Best Non-Profit 2013

Auburn Journal

Best of the Best Thrift Shop 2016

Auburn Journal

Best of the Best Nonprofit 2020

Auburn Journal

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who demonstrate that their school attendance has improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Operation School Bell®

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Chronic Absenteeism Rates at targeted schools with high numbers of students receiving new school clothing and shoes. Early indications show a small but significant increase in attendance.

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Operation School Bell®

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The basic school supplies for at-need students match the request letters sent out by teachers at the beginning of the school year. Beginning to track Chronic Absenteeism rates.

Number of children who receive new clothing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Operation School Bell®

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At need children receiving new school clothing and shoes. We have begun tracking Chronic Absenteeism rates (missing 19 days of school) and are seeing a small improvement at targeted schools.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Operation School Bell®

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Providing basic life skills for at risk teens attending court order high school.

Hours of tutoring administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Operation School Bell®

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Tutoring provided for K-3 children at lower socio-economic elementary schools.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Three overarching goals drive Assistance League of Greater Placer's plans and activities as defined in its Strategic Plan:

Goal 1: Philanthropic Programs
a. Identify evolving community needs.
b. Align philanthropic pr

Goal 2: Membership
a. Foster a supportive environment that promotes recruitment, increases retention and reflects members’
interests and skills.
b. Sustain an active Assisteens Auxiliary.

Goal 3: Resource Development
a. Align fundraising efforts with program budget requirements.
b. Diversify revenue streams.
c. Conduct an operational review of the thrift shop to align practices with current and changing conditions.

Goal 4: Education/Administration
a. Integrate long-term planning throughout the chapter.
b. Improve administrative processes and information sharing.

Strategy 1: Philanthropic Programs
a. Collaborate with local agencies and nonprofits to assess current communityneeds.
b. Utilize assessment data to restructure programs as needed.

Strategy 2: Membership
a. Maintain an up-to-date inventory of membership interests and skills.
b. Implement membership categories that attract members and increase diversity.
c. Increase Assisteens membership with chapter support; integrate Assisteens participation in chapter activities.

Strategy 3: Resource Development
a. Activate and expand Resource Development Committee.
b. Establish a committee to research and develop innovative revenue streams.
c. Develop a review process to include short and long term planning for the thrift shop.

Strategy 4: Education/Administration
a. Establish ongoing training programs to enable membership development and current and future leadership.
b. Develop effective and innovative practices that include assessment and accountability.

INTERNAL RESOURCES: Assistance League of Greater Placer had 214 member-volunteers who contributed 40.3K hours in FYE 2020 at a value of over $1M. Assistance League welcomes and orients new members throughout the year and maintains a multi-talented membership with professional and technical skills gained through careers in the public, private, non-profit and volunteer sectors. We are an all-volunteer organization with no paid staff.

EXTERNAL STRENGTHS: Assistance League maintains partnerships with a variety of organizations throughout Placer County. School districts provide support for Operation School Bell. Kids First distributes backpacks and school supplies. Kaiser and Sutter Hospitals and the California Highway Patrol partner with us to provide Sierra Bears to traumatized children. The Placer County Sheriff and Auburn Police partner in providing Assault Survivor Kits to women. Assistance League of Greater Placer has garnered a reputation for consistent quality programs providing assistance to thousands of people annually. The programs are focused on the most disadvantaged in our community.

CAPACITIES: Over the past year we have increased focus and efforts in support of fund-raising and grant-writing. We are also moving towards an online scheduling system for our Thrift Shop and programs.

CONNECTIONS: A strong public relations effort has contributed to the public perception of Assistance League through regular news articles, making new contacts with news media, and increasing our presence in social media.

Assistance League of Greater Placer evaluates each of its 13 programs annually. These evaluations are based upon established indicators and feedback from the communities served, program leaders and volunteers. The results are incorporated into the President's Annual Report, which is posted on our website. In the Fiscal Year ending May 31, 2020, our accomplishments included:

+Providing 1,752 children with new clothing and shoes
+Delivering backpacks, school supplies and dictionaries to 1,678 school children
+Tutoring 300 children for 326 hours of classroom time
+Supplying 1,760 teddy bears to hospitals and California Highway Patrol
+Providing 484 hours of life skills classes for 30 students
+Awarding $19,763 for community college scholarships
+Visiting 55 senior care residents for 474 hours
+Providing 37 people with clothing to re-enter the workforce
+Helping 57 recipients with unforeseen emergency needs
+Performing educational puppet shows for 2,344 children

At the end of our fiscal year, our chapter had 214 dedicated members who donated 40.3 K service hours and touched the lives of more than 8.1 K people served in Placer communities and surrounding areas. We have raised funds to support our philanthropic programs through our Thrift Shop, Annual Appeal, Bingo Round-up fundraiser, Fall Tea and Fashion Show fundraiser, grants from various organizations and donations from individuals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    At-risk children and adults in the communities of the Greater Placer area.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We eliminated several programs that were no longer meeting community needs. We added two new programs: Literacy Enrichment, where our members assist students with reading in the classroom under the direction of the teacher and Reaching Out, our program to address the needs of the homeless population in our area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board, our members,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Assistance League® of Greater Placer
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Assistance League® of Greater Placer

Board of directors
as of 8/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Joanne Kutzman

Assistance League of Greater Placer

Term: 2021 - 2022


Board co-chair

Katie Smith

Assistance League of Greater Placer

Term: 2021 - 2022

Janet Patten

Community Volunteer

Anne Thompson

Community Volunteer

Joanne Kutzman

Community Volunteer

Carol Brock

Community Volunteer

Trudi Riley-Quinn

Community Volunteer

Janice Noland

Community Volunteer

Linda Dunn

Community Volunteer

Katie Smith

Community Volunteer

Caryl Day-Johnsen

Community Volunteer

Elisa Montes

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.