NEPAL YOUTH FOUNDATION

Transforming Lives For Over 30 Years

aka NYF   |   San Francisco, CA   |  http://www.nepalyouthfoundation.org

Mission

Nepal Youth Foundation's mission is to provide hope and opportunity to Nepal's most impoverished children by providing them what is every child's birthright: Freedom, Health, Shelter and Education.

Ruling year info

1990

Principal Officer

Mr. Som Paneru

Main address

1016 Lincoln Blvd. Suite 222

San Francisco, CA 94129 USA

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Formerly known as

Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation (NYOF)

EIN

68-0224596

NTEE code info

International Educational Development (Q34)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Public Health Program (E70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes

NYF saves malnourished children and improves the health of children and families in Nepal.

Since 1998, we’ve built 17 Nutrition Rehabilitation Homes throughout Nepal, restoring the health and vitality of more than 20,000 children while their mothers learn to keep their families well-nourished with readily available foods.

Nutrition Outreach Camps in extremely remote villages reach hundreds and even thousands more families each year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Caregivers

As one of the largest non-governmental scholarship providers in Nepal, NYF provides life-transforming support to meet individual needs, from Kindergarten to Graduate School.

Priority is given to the most marginalized – including female, disabled, and low-caste students.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults

NYF operated children’s homes in rented buildings since 1992, raising almost 200 children with no where else to turn. Opened in 2016, our permanent children’s residences at Olgapuri (“Olga’s little oasis”) now offers a beautiful home for up to 80 children who live with their NYF “family” until they are self-sufficient.

Whenever possible, we strive to keep children with their relatives, particularly important in Nepal where family is one of the highest values. Culturally appropriate and cost-effective, Kinship Care provides financial support to extended family members who otherwise would not be able to keep an orphaned, abandoned, or at-risk child at home.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

In 2013 the Nepali Government officially abolished the Kamlari System, an amazing development in NYF’s campaign to end this form of child slavery. Since first tackling this generations-old practice in 2000, NYF has rescued and empowered almost 13,000 young women and created economic opportunities to prevent the illegal continuation of the practice.

In July 2020, NYF transferred leadership of programming designed specially to fight the practice of kamlari and rescue, educate, and empower these young women to the freed Kamlari girls themselves — through the Freed Kamlari Development Forum (FKDF).

The FKDF is a unique NGO with its own board, leadership, and programming goals. They’re currently focused on continuing education, early marriage prevention, and entrepreneurship.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Young adults

Our New Life Center provides treatment annually to up to 70 children and their mothers living with HIV/AIDS, one of the most stigmatized illnesses in Nepal.

The new purpose-built facility opened in 2017 on the grounds of our flagship Kathmandu NRH. This co-location is operationally efficient and cost-effective as staff and other administrative support can be shared between the two facilities.

In 2021, the New Life Center began a new phase of development, incorporating lessons learned during the pandemic into an expanded program beyond the walls of our dedicated facility. Though residential treatment is still a valuable piece of the New Life Center’s work, NYF is expanding outreach capabilities using connections to other grassroots organizations.

New elements for the redesigned program include more regular nutritional deliveries, medical check-ups for children needing care, awareness and advocacy, and financial support for caretakers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Many of the children and youth in NYF programs come from very difficult backgrounds; they’ve suffered more in their short childhood than most of us do in a lifetime.

NYF’s Ankur Counseling Center, the first children’s mental health program in Nepal, intersects with our other programs to help youth heal from abandonment, neglect, and stigma.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Ankur Counseling Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, Ankur Counseling Center expanded their services to reach even more community members (over the phone and online) in need of mental health support during COVID-19.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Nepal Youth Foundation’s goal is to provide opportunities to children in Nepal through a holistic approach, which includes what is every child’s birthright: education, health, shelter, and freedom.

Every day, NYF provides interventions that saves the lives of malnourished children; scholarships that offer opportunities to bright, impoverished youth; support that empowers young women who spent their childhoods in servitude; safe, healthy homes for children, and so much more.

Our strategy is holistic and our programs are varied and interconnected.

We take seriously the trust that a dependent child places in us, and we take a highly personal and holistic approach to the children and families we serve, even when that takes more time and energy. We ensure that we have the necessary financial and logistical stability before we support children who will depend on us. We will not abandon these children once they enter our fold.

Likewise, we ensure that we have sufficient logistical and financial support in launching programs before making promises to Nepalese communities. Since we cannot do everything, we do thoroughly what we can do – whether a small act or a major program – from inception to completion and follow-up.

We manage NYF’s growth carefully, developing programs in the context of local need, potential, and participation – not in terms of organizational ambition. We favor “slow but sure” growth that involves Nepali communities and organizations. We do so because we deeply admire and respect Nepalese culture and society, and strive to promote them in the children.

At the same time, we value our nimble ability to cut through red tape and act quickly – and strategically – exactly when needed. We prioritize interventions that can make significant, enduring improvements in children’s lives. For this reason we emphasize education and vocational training, as they provide opportunities for children and young adults to leverage what they've learned into lucrative careers in Nepal’s workforce, allowing them to build brighter futures for themselves, their families, and their communities

We creatively “bundle” our interventions with sustainability measures. For instance, when we restore a child with malnourishment back to health, we also teach their caregiver(s) how to prepare locally available foods to prevent future malnourishment. We also train caregiver(s) to share this valuable information with other families back at their villages.


The Nepal Youth Foundation's US headquarters is based in San Francisco, CA, while the Nepal headquarters are located in Kathmandu. Programs are implemented through a close partnership with NYF-Nepal, an autonomous Nepali NGO with local Board leadership. Chapters based in the UK, Hong Kong, and Germany help increase local awareness of the issues facing children and youth in Nepal, while raising funds to support NYF's work.

NYF invests entirely in local, Nepali staff and leadership. We are proud that there are no expatriates on the in-country staff of either the locally-based NGO nor the INGO.

As a locally-led NGO embedded in Nepal, NYF is the antithesis of the many "drop-in" international organizations that build a project that's not sustainable in the long term. When we launch new programs in response to identified needs, our commitment is to exit in a strategic manner that recognizes the impact on the lives of those we serve. Our goal is always to assist the beneficiaries of a program or project to maintain the benefits as we exit.

Being locally led and with over a 30-year record of integrity, NYF’s in-country leadership has strong relationships, well-earned credibility, and the ability to navigate bureaucracy and shifting political environments.

Our long-standing partnership between US resources and the local Nepali leadership integrates the strengths of each. NYF's programs are culturally appropriate and embraced by the communities we serve because they embody Nepali values and principals - not Western values being imposed from the outside. The President of the International NGO, Som Paneru (a prior NYF beneficiary), is Nepali and works directly with the US Board.

Our Empowering Freed Kamlari program is a great example of NYF's capabilities. After rescuing almost 13,000 young women and girls from servitude and pressuring the government to abolish the practice, NYF established an organization led by the young women themselves to advocate for their rights (Freed Kamlari Development Forum). We funded the establishment of over 40 local co-operatives that provide micro-loans—creating economic capacity and repositioning these formerly indentured and unvalued girls as small business owners and leaders in their communities.

Similarly, our Nutrition Program is succeeding on a national scale in partnership with the Nepali government. To date, we've transferred 15 Nutrition Rehabilitation Homes as planned to the government.

2018 marked the 5 year anniversary since the Nepali Government officially abolished the Kamlari System, a development in NYF's campaign to end this form of child servitude. Since first tackling this generations-old practice in 2000, NYF has rescued and empowered almost 13,000 girls and created economic opportunities to prevent the illegal continuation of the practice.

Our nutrition program, which started in 1998 to save severely malnourished children discharged prematurely from hospitals in Kathmandu, is succeeding on a national scale in partnership with the government of Nepal. The 17 Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes (NRH) we've built have saved over 15,000 malnourished children. We're proud of our NRH model where we transfer the operations to the government over the course of five years. Fifteen of the 17 have been handed over to date and NRH-17 is in its second year of operations. Our first flagship NRH remains our permanent treatment, training, and monitoring center.

For more than 20 years, J House for boys and K House for girls, have long provided a sanctuary for some of the most desperately needy children in Nepal. The finished construction of NYF's permanent Olgapuri Children’s Village in 2016 is truly a dream come true-providing a reliable social safety net, and a secure, home-like environment for up to 80 children each year. Our Kinship Care program keeps an additional 400 children with their own relatives each year -- especially important in Nepal where family is one of the highest values.

NYF scholarships enable children and youth from extremely poor families and very marginalized communities to attend school and even university, where they previously may have become child laborers, homeless, or worse. Over 50% of these scholarships are supporting girls in a country where they still lag well behind. In fiscal year 2018, 80% of NYF scholarship recipients passed the higher secondary exam, a tremendous success in the context of the 45% countrywide average.

Our vocational training program addresses the systemic problem of unemployment in Nepal, helping to break the cycle of poverty and creating lasting change for generations to come. In fiscal year 2018, 91% of graduates from the new Olgapuri Vocational School secured employment by the end of June 2018.

Our New Life Center program provides treatment for annually for approximately 70 children and their mothers living with HIV/AIDS, one of the most stigmatized diseases in Nepal.

NYF’s Ankur Counseling Center, the first children’s mental health program in Nepal, intersects with our other programs to help youth heal from abandonment, neglect, and stigma. For over a decade, NYF has provided traumatized youth with the support they need to turn a life of unimaginable hardship into one filled with hope and opportunity.

What's next: meeting ongoing commitments while strategically assessing new and expanded program areas to address the vast needs of impoverished Nepali people.

Financials

NEPAL YOUTH FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NEPAL YOUTH FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Christopher Heffelfinger

Berman Tabacco

Term: 2021 -

Olga Murray

Nepal Youth Foundation

Som Paneru

Nepal Youth Foundation

Nick Prior

Ernst & Young

Saskia Bowers van der Stap

Christopher Heffelfinger

Berman Tabacco

Greg Rosston

Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Tanya Bodde

Gina Parker

St. James's Place Wealth Management

Angela Pal

Stu Harden

David Browne

Ron Rosano

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.