Tibetan Nuns Project

aka TNP   |   Seattle, WA   |  http://www.tnp.org

Mission

The Tibetan Nuns Project was founded in 1987 to provide education and humanitarian aid to refugee nuns from Tibet and Himalayan regions of India. Our mission is to: Educate and empower nuns of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition as teachers and leaders; and to establish, strengthen, and support educational institutions to preserve the Tibetan religion and culture. The Tibetan Nuns Project supports seven nunneries and over 700 Tibetan Buddhist nuns in India.

Ruling year info

1995

Founder and Special Advisor

Mrs. Rinchen Khando Choegyal

U.S. Founder and Board Chair

Dr. Elizabeth Napper

Main address

815 Seattle Blvd. S #216

Seattle, WA 98134 USA

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EIN

68-0327175

NTEE code info

Women's Rights (R24)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sponsorship

The Tibetan Nuns Project is based in the Dharamsala region of northern India. Our sponsorship program supports over 700 nuns from all religious orders of Tibetan Buddhism in eight different nunneries. We also support nuns living on their own and retreat and provide special educational assistance to small nunneries in different parts of the Himalayan region. We have established Dolma Ling, a nonsectarian nunnery and educational institute, and Shugsep Nunnery for women practicing a special Nyingma lineage tradition.

Population(s) Served

Each year, the Tibetan Nuns Project supports the annual inter-nunnery debate called the Jang Gonchoe. Until the 1990s, Tibetan Buddhist nuns were excluded from this form and level of education. Hundreds of nuns from 7 to 9 nunneries in India and Nepal take part in this month-long event that is held from early October to early November each year. The practice of debate is an essential part of monastic education in the Tibetan tradition and joins logical thinking with a deeper understanding of Buddhist philosophy. The inter-nunnery debate is a vital educational opportunity. By supporting this event, our donors are helping the nuns grow in confidence, to prepare for taking higher degrees such as the Geshema degree, to become teachers and leaders, and to preserve the rich Tibetan Buddhist culture and religion.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To provide equality of access to education for the nuns so that they can receive the highest degrees, equivalent to a PhD, and become teachers and leaders in their communities.
2. To continue to grow and provide stable funding to the annual inter-nunnery debate, the Jang Gonchoe, the month-long event at which over 200 nuns from India and nepal take part and which is now a core part of their monastic education.

Financials

Tibetan Nuns Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Tibetan Nuns Project

Board of directors
as of 6/13/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Elizabeth Napper

Tibetan Nuns Project

Tseten Phanucharas

No Affiliation

Steve Wilhelm

No Affiliation

Elizabeth Napper

Tibetan Nuns Project

Elizabeth Goldblatt

No Affiliation

Vicki Robinson

Dechen Tsering

Robin Groth

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No