TRI COUNTY WILDLIFE CARE INC

Saving Wildlife Saves Us!

Jackson, CA   |  http://www.pawspartners.org

Mission

It is the mission of Tri County Wildlife Care (TCWC) to improve the quality of life in our region through education and public awareness of our native wildlife, and by giving the sick, injured and orphaned wildlife a second chance to be free. Our volunteers serve the wildlife of Amador, Calaveras, and eastern San Joaquin counties in northern California, an area of approximately 3000 square miles.

We also serve the human population who live and move here to enjoy the wildlife.There are no other organizations in these three counties that are permitted by the California Fish and Wildlife Service to rehabilitate our native wildlife. TCWC cares for these injured, orphaned and displaced animals seven days a week, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and has been doing this since 1994.

Our goal is to release every one of them back into the wild. We receive no funding from state or federal agencies and depend solely on donations and fundraisers.

Ruling year info

1997

Board President

Sandy Greene

Main address

PO Box 367

Jackson, CA 95642 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0354986

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our challenges are two-fold: due to increasing loss of wildlife habitat from the human population growth in our 3 counties and increasing seasonal destructive wildfires, TCWC continues to see a sustained need for compassionate care for displaced, diseased, and emaciated wildlife. In addition, many animals are now rehabbed on volunteer caregiver’s private owned land. This network of volunteer caregivers is aging and retiring and their land is no longer available to TCWC. Our solution is a more spacious permanent wildlife rehabilitation center on our own land. We are excited to start build on an Animal Care Center to centralize our base of operations, starting with care of songbirds and birds of prey care. Our second challenge is the growing disconnect between many children and nature. Since these are the future wildlife stewards, TCWC is in the process of adding more ambassador education animals to our education team and developing creative digital ways to mentor our community of kids.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SECOND CHANCE TO BE FREE-CRITTER CARE

This is our primary cause, to provide for the rehabilitation of our native wildlife. TCWC hotline volunteers answer calls regarding wildlife 24/7 for 365 days. Over 4,000 calls are received from our 3 counties annually. We determine, following protocols, if the bird, mammal, or reptile is truly distressed and recommend a course of treatment.

Sometimes x-rays or surgery are required and these are often donated by Jackson Creek Veterinary Clinic, Angels Camp Veterinary Hospital, and Dr. Jeanne Smith, Avian Veterinarian. TCWC only pays for the medications. For complex cases that may need extraordinary protocols, we also consult with U.C. Davis Veterinary School.

The wildlife patient is then transported to our appropriate rehabber and rehabilitation location for care that begins in a quiet place. As the wildling progresses, it is moved outdoors to a cage for more exercise and a more natural habitat and eventual freedom.

Our rehabbers attend yearly training sessions to keep current on care-giving protocols. These protocols adhere to International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (IWRC) and CCWR (California Council For Wildlife Rehabilitators) standards as well as federal and state permit requirements.

We do everything we can to ensure these beautiful creatures are given a second chance to be wild and free. You can help too by calling us at 209-283-EAGL(3245) for advice.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Free of charge and upon request, TCWC volunteers visit schools, clubs and events, reaching preschool kids, K-12 students and adults. We demonstrate the continuing harmful effects of pesticides, insecticides, and poisons on wildlife and subsequently, on us. We advise our community on ways to Go Green for Wildlife and how to help animals that are migrating.

Our lessons on wildlife conservation and living green change annually. The topics range from Amazing Owls, to the Grey Wolf of Yellowstone National Park, to the Near Extinction of the Peregrine Falcon due to the use of DDT, but our theme is always SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US.

We believe this is true and teach that biodiversity provides the healthy ecosystem with clean air and water that we all need to thrive. Our future depends on living in balance with nature and we promote this lesson for the health of future generations.

The stars at these sessions are our ambassador education animals: our Barn owl, Northern saw-whet owl, Western screech-owl, Great-horned owl. A Swainson's hawk, Burrowing owl, Peregrine falcon, American kestrel and opossum have also joined the team.

Since 2014, TCWC volunteers have made 167 school, scout, and event visits, reaching 20,000 people and half of them have been kids. Clearly, educating about the importance of wildlife and living in balance is important to us.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Service Award 2019

Amador County Chamber of Commerce

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

SECOND CHANCE TO BE FREE-CRITTER CARE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our Survival Rates, as measured by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Medical Database, are 68% in 2020, 76% in 2019, 72% in 2018, 76% in 2017 and 74% in 2016.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US-COMMUNITY EDUCATION

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our belief is that SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US! because biodiversity provides the healthy ecosystem that we all need to thrive.

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US-COMMUNITY EDUCATION

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

SECOND CHANCE TO BE FREE-CRITTER CARE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These individuals received advice and suggestions on how to humanely deal with their wildlife concern. Our goal is to reduce intake of animals that are not truly distressed.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Tri County Wildlife Care (TCWC) is a state and federally permitted rehabilitation center for the care of injured, orphaned and displaced native California wildlife. Since 1994, we are the only organization permitted to do this work in Amador, Calaveras, and eastern San Joaquin counties in northern California. Our group of 80 volunteers' span of impact reaches over 100 species of wildlife and 3,000 square miles of habitat.

TCWC's aim is to ensure that our communities know and have confidence that we are the group to come to for solutions to their wildlife concerns. These concerns range from finding a wildling in distress that needs rescue and rehabilitation to dealing with a “nuisance" wildlife situation that needs a solution which helps both the person and the wildling involved. Since our vision is a world where wildlife and people thrive together, TCWC works to inspire our communities to live in balance with our native wildlife.

We have two primary programs: SECOND CHANCE TO BE FREE – Critter Care and SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US – Community Education. Our goals for SECOND CHANCE TO BE FREE are to release 100% of the injured, orphaned, or ill wildlife we rehabilitate back to the wild - healthy, free and self-sufficient. For most rehabilitation facilities, a 50% or greater release rate is considered highly successful but 100% remains our objective. Secondly, we aim to release them as close as possible to the location from which they were rescued, preferably to their biological “family". Lastly, we strive to include their human rescuers in the release event. Our goals for SAVING WILDLIFE SAVES US are also three-fold: to add to the wildlife knowledge of our area adults and children, to foster a realistic and positive attitude towards wildlife, and to inspire and engage our community to make behavior changes that will keep wildlife wild and free.

The primary outcome Tri County Wildlife Care aims to achieve year over year is to increase our release and reunite rates by 5% and decrease our intake rate by 5% and to present our education program to every pre-school and elementary school within our sphere of influence. Reaching out to all of our area's school children remains a priority since we are the mentors for these future wildlife stewards.

To accomplish this strategically, we have established a wildlife center of operations dedicated to songbird care and community education. At this center, we will emphasize reducing intake through education, expanding our trained volunteer base, increasing our caregivers' medical knowledge, and providing ill and injured songbirds with a climate-controlled nursery. Our satellite rehabilitation sites will continue their operations, but we are developing backup on-call volunteer rehabilitators to ensure continuous capabilities. TCWC is a participant in the Wildlife Rehabilitation Medical Database (WRMD) where we contribute to California's goal of maximizing and sharing wildlife rehabilitation efforts. To reduce intake, articles and press releases giving guidance about wildlife situations that are common for the time of year are published monthly in local newspapers. TCWC also advocates, successfully, for road sign and speed limit changes that prevent wildlife/human accidents. Lastly, our phone system has been restructured so that every caller will reach a human, either a rehabber or answering service, which enables us to address the caller's specific concern more quickly and thoroughly, resulting in solutions rather than delays.

TCWC creates handouts for school children to take home to parents to increase our impact. We record wildlife tips to be aired on local radio, spots on local television, and daily updates to our social media sites which invite our community to participate in wildlife conservation. Monthly website articles that feature positive benefits of the current “Gold Country Critter" and "Living Wildlife Friendly" are posted to our website www.pawspartners.org. We are increasing the number of education animals. These wildlings leave a lasting and meaningful impression on all ages and are vital to establishing a positive connection to wildlife.

Periodically TCWC researches and benchmarks against the “best practices" of other wildlife rehabilitation groups and medical delivery organizations to improve our processes and operations.

Financially, in addition to our standard profit and loss tracking, we also monitor a yearly forecasting report to ensure funds necessary to achieve our goals will be available.

We partnered with A-PAL Humane Society in 2021 to jointly purchase a centrally located, move-in ready animal care center, previously a Pet Bed & Breakfast, located next door to our veterinarian of record. This animal center now houses our permanent songbird nursery. An adjacent acre donated in 2019 will eventually be our raptor rehab area. As the need develops, we will supplement our satellite sites at the animal center for other species. Our Director of Animal care networks with neighbor rehab facilities to pair animals when required and to hold annual workshops. Local businesses and professionals donate supplies and services for free or at discounted rates, enabling TCWC to carefully stretch the impact of cash donations received from our community of supporters. Seven local veterinarians and a nearby prosthetist donate their services and counsel and the U.C. Davis School of Veterinary Medicine is available for special training and help with complex medical cases.

Amador and Calaveras county school districts, along with local service, social groups, and county fairs continually ask for our education team, including our education ambassadors, to present in their classrooms and at their events, thus providing the venues. TCWC presents annually to over 3500 attendees. Our education team, consisting of rehabbers and education animals, changes its lesson yearly and our presentations are free of charge. Local scout troops partner with us to provide opportunities for their scouts to earn merit badges, including Eagle Scout status.

TCWC has joined with our local humane society to share resources needed to maintain our social media and website presence as well as a shared animal care center.

TCWC has achieved a greater than 75% survival rate over the past few years but California's warming pattern is a major challenge to our goal of increasing the number of animals we release and decreasing the number we intake. Our volunteer base is growing but we are still unable to find enough capable and consistent volunteers to staff our songbird nursery during prime baby season (May – September). We meet this challenge by hiring, on a part-time basis, local workers but are confident our new bird nursery will attract the volunteers we need. Thirdly, transport of our wildlife to other facilities to be paired and transport from eastern San Joaquin county, an hour away, continues to challenge us, but a vet tech from that area now voluntarily transports animals to us on her way home.
Since 2014, TCWC volunteers have made 190 school, scout, and event visits, reaching more than 22,000 people and half of them have been kids. We have already met our goal of presenting our education program to all Amador county elementary schools, so TCWC will continue to focus more on Calaveras county and eastern San Joaquin county schools.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

TRI COUNTY WILDLIFE CARE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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TRI COUNTY WILDLIFE CARE INC

Board of directors
as of 9/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sandy Greene

Tri County Wildlife Care

Term: 2015 -

Alba Arosio

Tri County Wildlife Care

Lynda Cook

Tri County Wildlife Care

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/21/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data