GOLD2023

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF FOOD BANKS

aka CAFB   |   Oakland, CA   |  www.cafoodbanks.org

Mission

The California Association of Food Banks leads the collective effort to end hunger in California. Your support powers our pursuits to ensure California’s fruits and vegetables are not wasted but rather recovered and equitably distributed across our state’s food bank network, advocate to change the systems and policies that create hunger in the first place, and ensure access to nutritious food for those who need it right now.

Ruling year info

1997

Principal Officer

Stacia Hill-Levenfeld

Main address

1624 Franklin Street, Ste 722

Oakland, CA 94612 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0392816

NTEE code info

Professional Societies, Associations (K03)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CalFresh Outreach

Assisting with the application process for CalFresh (formerly the Food Stamp Program) to increase the affordability of healthier foods:  CalFresh benefits help stretch a family’s dollars so they can afford the higher costs of fresh, nutritious food. But California consistently has one of the lowest participation rates in the country. CAFB offers program support and match funding for outreach activities to member food banks and other non-profits. This year, the Association partnered with 50 organizations to increase participation among eligible, low-income Californians. CAFB has also played an important leadership role in strengthening the statewide capacity for outreach by developing a statewide hotline, an outreach guide and website, a prescreening and application tool and other outreach materials. CAFB provides training and support for peer-to-peer travel and support. More information about these services are available at  www.mycalfresh.org and www.misalimentos.org.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Advocating for policies  that increase low-income people’s access to healthy food:  California’s food banks were among the first in the nation to include policy and advocacy work as a core of their anti-hunger efforts. Now, most CAFB member agencies advocate at the federal, state, and local levels to improve anti-hunger and nutrition programs, especially for CalFresh (formerly food stamps) and emergency food. Several participate, and even lead, local nutrition policy coalitions. The most recent additions to the expanding advocacy list are the federal and state budget processes, which affect funding for health and human services programs vital to many lowincome Californians. CAFB assists our partners in efforts to strengthen this work by providing venues to communicate with policy makers and offering leadership in strategy and message development.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Directly distributing  healthier food to people in need: Fresh fruits and vegetables are the fastest  growing area of food bank distribution.  This has been made possible with  the implementation of CAFB’s Farm to Family Program.  In 2011, Farm to  Family distributed 164 million pounds of fresh produce.  This produce consists of a  variety of fruits and vegetables that CAFB acquires from the state’s growers  and packers at no or very low cost.  The increased availability of produce  has allowed food banks to provide healthier foods to their clients and has put California on the  cutting edge of healthy food banking.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Leadership, coordination,  and capacity-building: Our greatest strength remains our membership of over 40 local food banks. These food banks serve communities across California, including the urban and suburban population centers in the Bay Area, Southern California, and Central Valley, as well as the more rural and remote areas. Over the past four years, CAFB has secured millions of dollars to support our members in their efforts to increase produce distribution, enhance food stamp outreach and nutrition education and to improve the overall capacity of food banks in rural communities. CAFB facilitates the sharing of best practices among food banks through regional meetings, newsletters and conferences to help our members become more effective in their work.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Financials

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF FOOD BANKS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF FOOD BANKS

Board of directors
as of 11/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Natalie Caples

Central California Food Bank

Leslie Bacho

Second Harvest of Silicon Valley

Nicole Celaya

Foodlink for Tulare County

Shurla Lovejoy

Dignity Health Connected Living

Juan Martinez

Kings County Community Action

Beth Stanton

Interfaith Council of Amador

Monica White

Food Share of Ventura County

Regi Young

Alameda County Community Food Bank

Natalie Caples

Central California Food Bank

Michael Flood

Los Angeles Regional Food Bank

Amanda Friscia

Fort Bragg Food Bank

Dave Martinez

Placer Food Bank

Claudia Keller

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County

Casey Castillo

Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data