PLATINUM2022

THE DIBBLE INSTITUTE

Resources for Teaching Relationship Skills to Teens and Young Adults

aka The Dibble Institute   |   Berkeley, CA   |  www.DibbleInstitute.org

Mission

We empower teens and young adults with knowledge and research-based skills to successfully navigate their intimate relationships. As a curriculum developer, we do this by equipping organizations with: • Best practices curricula • Professional training • Access to funding • Ongoing technical assistance

Ruling year info

2000

President

Ms. Catherine Reed

Main address

PO Box 7881

Berkeley, CA 94707 USA

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Formerly known as

The Dibble Fund for Marriage Education

EIN

68-0435573

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Teens and young adults need the skills and knowledge to develop healthy romantic relationships now and in the future. The Dibble Institute functions to address this need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mind Matters

People experiencing trauma and toxic stress often have difficulty regulating their emotional responses when facing challenges in school, life, and relationships. As participants learn the skills and strategies in Mind Matters, they can begin to say, “I am not a victim of what happened to me.”

Mind Matters’ 12 one-hour lessons or 21 30-minute sessions, teach students ages 12 and up to respond to negative experiences with innovative methods based on current research and neuroscience. These skills give individuals a way to take charge of their emotions and improve their states of mind. Students learn to address their physical, relational, and mental health needs.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults

Relationship Smarts PLUS 4.0, based on the 5-year federal evaluation study at Auburn University, is a research-based curriculum that uses hands-on activities to build skills and knowledge necessary for making wise relationship choices.

Relationship Smarts PLUS 4.0 covers topics such as maturity, identifying values, peer pressure, attractions and infatuation, building blocks for positive relationships, assessing relationship health, a low-risk relationship strategy, principles of smart relationships, the nature of true intimacy, a realistic concept of love, and breaking up. Also includes date violence prevention and assertiveness skills, communication/conflict skills, identity and future orientation, and a unique approach to pregnancy prevention that educates about the needs of children.

An engaging student workbook provides teens with an opportunity to review, to reflect on, and to apply what they have learned to their own lives. Another feature is the “Parent/Guardian-Teen Connection” – activities which convey core content to parents or guardians and serve as catalysts for critical teen-parent conversations.

Relationship Smarts PLUS 4.0 - SRA is also available.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
LGBTQ people

Unplanned pregnancy, single parenting, and troubled relationships are a serious threat to the wellbeing and futures of many young adults, as well as to their children.

Love Notes 3.0 was created for this vulnerable, high-risk audience. In 13 lessons they discover, often for the first time, how to make wise choices about partners, sex, relationships, pregnancy, and more.

Love Notes takes an innovative approach to these topics by integrating relationship skills with pregnancy prevention and practical strategies for motivating change:

A realistic context for learning that incorporates language, values and scenarios that is relevant to this audience.
An appeal to aspirations that helps youth to cultivate a personal vision for love, intimacy, and success.
New motivations for behavioral change, such as exploring, from a child’s perspective, the impact of unplanned pregnancy and unstable relationships.
Empowerment to achieve healthy relationships through both knowledge and practical skills.

Love Notes SRA/SRR is also available.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Understanding money is important for all teens. Even basic financial competence can improve their relationships as well as help them attain goals for lifestyle, education, career and family.

In real life, it is often hidden attitudes that dictate how people actually spend, save and think about money, regardless of financial skills or economic status. Money Habitudes focuses on exploring this "human side of money."

In 5 lively lessons, Money Habitudes® explores how people behave around money, and why this matters to teens – especially in their own lives. For example:

How money works and affects our lives.
Different approaches to handling money – spontaneous, practical, carefree, security, generous, and more.
The symbolism of money – as a sign of power, status, love, safety, independence, spontaneity, loyalty and more.
The influence of family, media, culture, and life events on habits and attitudes.
The advantages and challenges of different approaches to money.
A key goal is helping teens to understand their individual financial patterns. The Money Habitudes for Teens card game, integrated into the lessons, offers a fun, engaging way to uncover this information. The game also helps build awareness of their values, and reveals new choices in many areas of their lives.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Money Habitudes 2® is a quick program introducing vulnerable youth to the non-technical, human side of money – a critical element of successful money management.

Lessons explore how hidden attitudes affect the ways people -especially those with few financial resources – actually behave around money. Topics include:

Why money management is important in our lives.
Different approaches to handling money –spontaneous, practical, carefree, security, generous, and more.
The symbolism of money– as a sign of power, status, love, safety, independence, loyalty and more.
The influence of family, media, culture, and life events.
The advantages and challenges of different approaches to money.
The interplay between money and relationships.
A key goal is helping young people identify their personal financial patterns – and why these matter.

Money Habitudes 2® is written specifically for at-risk or low resource youth in community programs, including pregnancy prevention, teen parenting, and workforce development. The scenarios are realistic, reflecting the students’ limited resources and lack of financial know-how.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Smart Marriage Impact Award 2007

Coalition for Marriage, Couples, and Family Education

Distinguished Achievement Award 2009

American Association of Educational Publishers

21st Century Champion Award 2009

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our curricula are being used by community nonprofits, community- and faith-based organizations, state agencies, tribes, universities, and a variety of other settings.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017 the Dibble Institutes curricula was used in 275 new programs across the United States and Canada, with additional programs in St Kitts, Great Britain, and Australia.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) Reach an increased number of youth in more diverse settings with evidence-based relationship skills education.
2) Create an environment conducive to teaching more youth healthy romantic relationship skills.

At The Dibble Institute, we:

Believe in the power of relationships.
• We focus on teaching healthy romantic relationship skills and knowledge to young people.
• We build strong relationships, networks, and collaborations with clients, partners, contractors, researchers, vendors, supporters, policy makers, and staff.

Seek excellence.
• We use research and evidence as the basis of our work.
• We strive to be the best in all that we do.
• We hold each other and ourselves to the highest standards.

Exist to serve and to lead.
• We focus on the needs of young people and those who serve and teach them.
• We impact the lives of young people and our culture through our leadership in the field.
• We make decisions in consideration of our mission and margin.

1. We provide leadership in the field as a clearinghouse to disseminate information, research, and funding opportunities in the field of youth relationship education.

2. We advocate for youth relationship skills programming with policy makers, influencers, and decision makers.

3. We use research to develop, publish, and disseminate best practices.

4. We collaborate with organizations and individuals who share our vision.

5. We directly train participants in partnership with child support departments, community colleges, and other organizations that do not have the capacity to deliver the materials themselves.

6. We evaluate our relationship skills programs and assist others in doing so.

7. We educate others in the needs for and benefits of youth relationship education.

8. We promote youth relationship education champions as they model program implementation in their settings.

9. We provide excellent customer service, grant and fundraising assistance, and technical assistance.

1. In response to great need for self-soothing skills and trauma informed practices during the Covid Pandemic, Mind Matters Now is a direct response initiative taking self-soothing skills directly to youth.
2. Love Notes 3.0 has been evaluated at the University of Louisville and found to be 46% more effective as an innovative pregnancy prevention strategy for at-risk youth.
3. The students who participated in the Love U2 Relationship Smarts program experienced significant improvements in terms of increases in relationship knowledge, decreases in destructive verbal and physical conflict strategies, increases in reasoning strategies, and positive changes in relationship beliefs regarding healthy relationships.
4. In 2012, Relationship Smarts PLUS and Love Notes (its adaptation for young adults and young parents) were placed on the CDC-SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices list.

We are continually improving our programs and evaluating to bring the most current research and evidence-based relationship education to the youth all over the world. We will continue to work with others as a force for good in our field of youth relationship education.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

THE DIBBLE INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE DIBBLE INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 07/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Catherine Reed

The Dibble Institute

Catherine Reed

The Dibble Institute

David Maupin

Maupin Financial Services

Robert Denham Ph.D.

University of Redlands

Richard Hickey

Hickey Consulting

Bruce Wick

Risk Management Services

Dava Kelly

Redlands Unified School District

Kim Clark, Ph.D.

San Bernardino State University

Ken Stein

Redlands YMCA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable