Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

EATING DISORDERS RESOURCE CENTER

Awareness, Advocacy, Recovery

aka EDRC

Campbell, CA

Mission

The mission of Eating Disorders Resource Center (EDRC) is to 1) raise awareness of eating disorders (EDs) through presentations to physicians and health care professionals, educators, and community groups; 2) promote recovery through access to screening, treatment, experts, support groups, and the first local comprehensive resource directory; and 3) participate in local, state, and national advocacy efforts to support mental health parity, eating disorders legislation, and effective insurance coverage.

Ruling Year

2006

Executive Director

Janice Bremis

Main Address

3131 S Bascom Ave

Campbell, CA 95008 USA

Keywords

Eating Disorders, Treatment, Support Groups, Intervention, Community Education

EIN

68-0616393

 Number

6786158250

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Eating Disorder, Addiction (F53)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Four out of ten Americans either suffer or have known someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. The prevalence of eating disorders has doubled since the 1960s. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness: the American Psychiatric Association (APA) reports that 5-10% of anorexics die within ten years of onset, 18-20% die within twenty years of onset, and only 50% report ever being cured. Although eating disorders are difficult to diagnose, with early and proper identification and intervention, recovery is possible. EDRC was founded in 2006 as the first and only local non-profit to provide education, awareness, and resources about eating disorders. The primary target population are males and females of all ages, ethnicities, and socio-economic status in Silicon Valley. Yearly goals include a minimum of educational trainings, support groups, daily live and online help, and community awareness events.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Eating Disorders Awareness, Recovery, and Advocacy

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of volunteers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of competitions held

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals reached through direct educational programs, call and email support, and support groups

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The mission of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the general public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. EDRC is a vital resource in Silicon Valley. EDRC 1) offers a comprehensive, online, local resource directory; 2) responds to calls and emails from patients, family members, clinics, and health care professionals requesting recovery support, information, and help navigating the health care system; 3) provides an education and outreach program on the early detection and intervention of eating disorders; and 4) facilitates monthly support groups for sufferers and their families and friends.

EDRC accomplishes its goals by providing: In the area of AWARENESS: -The annual Be-you-tiful Be Free writing contest for students at local middle schools and high schools. This contest promotes healthy body image and encourages young adults to embrace their differences. -Various events during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week in February. In the area of EDUCATION: EDRC provides an outstanding speakers bureau, consisting of physicians, therapists, dietitians, psychologists, psychiatrists, and post-doctoral researchers at Stanford and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. Trainings are coordinated in hospitals, community clinics, and non-profits in order to promote prevention, intervention, early diagnosis, and access to treatment. Trainings include instruction on: -screening for and recognizing the early signs and symptoms of eating disorders -evidence-based effective treatments -available community resources -co-morbid conditions. Education is critical to reducing the duration and cost of treatment, the number of chronic cases, and the amount of lives lost to this deadly disease. In the area of RECOVERY: EDRC offers free monthly support groups in which family members, friends, and individuals struggling with eating and body image issues can receive support not currently offered by any other nonprofit in the community. Though not a substitute for professional treatment, support groups are essential to recovery and are especially valuable to those with limited or no insurance coverage. The EDRC website provides the most up-to-date, comprehensive directory of treatment professionals, educational materials, support group information, and insurance support in Santa Clara County. EDRC responds daily to calls and emails for help, and connects callers with resources suitable to their need. As an example, a client recently called regarding her 19 year-old daughter who is struggling with an eating disorder, substance abuse, and self-harm. EDRC is helping locate a residential program for her that accepts Cigna and treats dual diagnosis disorders.

EDRC accomplishes its goals through collaboration with numerous local partners including: Santa Clara County Medical Association, Santa Clara County Health and Hospital System, County Department of Mental Health, Community Health Clinics, California Medical Association, Santa Clara County Dental Society, Santa Clara County Library District, Cielo House, Center for Discovery, and local hospitals and treatment centers. We also partner with Stanford, San Jose State University, the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI), and the Community Health Awareness Council (CHAC). National partners include the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC), Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), Academy of Eating Disorders (AED), and National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). Partners help share our resources, allowing more care providers, community members, and sufferers to receive education and treatment support. Partners also collaborate for community awareness events and co-sponsor many of our educational and outreach programs. We also have invested in an endowment to ensure long-term sustainability, and we have long-term consistent donors who contribute regularly to our programs and mission. On our team, we have Janice Bremis, the Founder, who is an expert in all local and many national eating disorder treatment professionals, centers, and resources, as well as Kaitlyn McLaren, the Program Manager, who is pursuing her Masters in counseling psychology at Santa Clara University. Our Board of Directors is made up of 4 active leaders and community volunteers. We have developed a "Pocket Tool" for physicians to act as a "go-to" informational resource to aid in prevention, early detection, and intervention of eating disorders. Several advocacy teams are in place that are working to educate specific populations and promote legislation for mental health parity.

EDRC will measure the program's impact through the following methods: 1. Tracking the number of completed educational presentations and number of attendees. 2. Evaluation forms to determine effectiveness of each program (e.g., salient points learned, quality of information presented, and feedback for improvement). 3. Follow-up discussions with clients for more in-depth assessments. 4. Tracking the number of emails, phone calls, and in-person assistance. 5. Tracking the number of support group attendees and feedback from evaluations. 6. Using Survey Monkey for additional feedback. 7. Gathering testimonials from clients including community members and professionals. Feedback from each of these tools will be used to evaluate and revise existing curriculum. Our goal is to: 1) Coordinate 2 community events per year, including our Be-you-tiful Be Free writing contest 2) Publish a minimum of 4 articles per year in local newspapers or magazines 3) Produce a new public service announcement (PSA) for EDRC 4) Participate in TV and radio station interviews 5) Post daily on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram 6) Increase our website hit volume by 10% yearly 7) Coordinate 2 direct educational programs per month at local community centers, hospitals, or nonprofits. 8) Answer calls and emails for support services daily 9) Expand our free monthly support groups in terms of offering more times/locations and increasing numbers reached 10) Participate in local and national efforts at least twice per year 11) Actively fundraising through grants, appeals, and social media These goals are assessed daily and monthly, as well as quarterly during interim reports to funders. We also assess goals yearly to determine which goals need to be adjusted and measures needed for improvement.

EDRC's success is contributed to our consistent focus, expanded partnerships, and the quality and passion with which we provide services. Every objective we are working on currently, including planning for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week and the next annual Be-you-tiful Be Free writing contest, propels us toward achieving our goals and reaching more individuals with the goal of eating disorder prevention, early diagnosis, intervention, and recovery. Our daily support to clients and family members is making a difference in their lives. (see Guidestar reviews for testimonials). Our connections with the community have helped accomplish our goals on a wider scale. We've honed in on our statistical tracking and have a system to take detailed call notes, gather testimonials, and record percentage of satisfaction after educational programs. Follow-ups are key to our evaluation. However, the greatest obstacle continues to be the stigma and shame associated with the illness, which prevents many people from seeking help. Our Board of Directors guide us in developing strategies and objectives.

External Reviews

Awards

Crystal Bowl Award (Volunteer Recognition) 2012

Junior League

49ers Community Quarterback Award (Volunteer Recognition) 2013

Outstanding Volunteer/Gift

Magazine Publication (May Issue) 2013

Oprah

Crystal Bowl Award (Volunteer Recognition) 2020

Junior League

Crystal Bowl Award (Volunteer Recognition) 2020

Junior League

Crystal Bowl Award (Volunteer Recognition) 2020

Junior League

Affiliations & Memberships

Eating Disorders Coalition 2011

Photos

Financials

EATING DISORDERS RESOURCE CENTER

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/13/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Decline to state
Disability Status
Decline to state

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 04/13/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
done
We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.