McMains Children's Developmental Center

aka McMains Children's Developmental Center   |   Baton Rouge, LA   |  www.mcmainscdc.org

Mission

The mission of the McMains Children's Developmental Center (MCDC) is to advance the quality of life for children and their families by providing physical, developmental, academic and communication services.

Ruling year info

1971

Executive Director

Mrs. Anne Hindrichs

Main address

1805 College Dr

Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA

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Formerly known as

Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Baton Rouge, Inc.

EIN

72-0459036

NTEE code info

Rehabilitative Medical Services (E50)

Autism (G84)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 6 children in the US will be diagnosed with a developmental disability or delay. Developmental Disabilities have steadily increased since the 1990s. Furthermore, children have a 1 in 59 chance in being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, while cerebral palsy continues to be the most common motor disability in childhood. Based on the 2016 Annual Report for Disability Statistics & Demographics, rates of disability increase with age. In the US, less than 1.0% of the under 5 population had a disability. For those ages 5-17, the rate was 5.4% and for ages 18-64 the rate was 10.5%. Early detection/treatment of children with disabilities could help reduce these numbers in adults. Therefore, it is imperative that children receive outpatient rehabilitation therapies, so that they can succeed at home, at school, and in the community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Occupational Therapy

When people hear the phrase “occupational therapy”, they may think that occupational therapists work with people in their “occupation”. To some extent, this is true. A child’s occupation is to play and to learn. Through play, children learn how to interact with the world and form appropriate reactions. Our occupational therapists work with children as they learn through play. Treatment focuses on improving participation in the home and community through the development of fine motor skills, sensory processing skills, coordination, strength and self-care skills. For example, improving your child’s ability to open and close containers or use tools such as a pencil or a toothbrush are components of occupational therapy.

Occupational therapy also assists children in improving their ability to engage with the world and react to situations. Your occupational therapist will develop ways to help your child make sense of how he or she responds to a variety of sensory events that occur throughout a typical day. Intensive one-on-one therapy sessions provide the child and family with skills and adaptations to the challenges they face with the goal to improve functional independence in the home and community settings. Our therapists will work with you on integrating these skills into your child’s daily life.

Population(s) Served

Our physical therapists provide treatment to enable children with physical disabilities and developmental delays to become as independent as possible in all gross motor skills. They assess children to determine if they have deficits such as muscle tightness and weakness, increased or decreased flexibility, abnormal reflexes and impaired sensory perception. All of these issues can affect a child's ability to sit, crawl, stand and walk.

Whatever the child's ability, the end goal is to get him or her moving, exploring the environment and interacting with family and peers. With this in mind, therapy takes place all over the building, from working with the equipment in the physical therapy gym to riding adapted bikes in the hallways.

We work with equipment such as walkers, wheelchairs, braces, standers and adapted bikes. Our adapted bikes not only provide therapeutic benefits, but they give children who cannot ride a standard bike the experience of riding a bike.

Our therapists will help you determine the adaptations and equipment needed for your child to be as independent as possible. We also provide TheraSuit, an intensive physical therapy protocol that accelerates progress.

Population(s) Served

Our speech-language pathologists treat children with varying levels of speech, language and communication deficits. We see a variety of children, from those who have trouble pronouncing their “R’s” and “S’s” to children who are non-verbal or have limited language skills. The end goal is the same: to provide treatment to help your child communicate effectively. This involves the understanding of needs and ideas through clear speech and language, whether verbal or through an alternative communication system, with skills appropriate to the developmental age of the child. We also work with children who have voice and fluency disorders to help them communicate with family, friends and peers. Children who have oral motor delays and weaknesses can also receive therapy to increase strength and coordination of the oral cavity for feeding and speech.

Children who are non-verbal or who have limited language skills can use assistive technology to access pictures or other speech-generating mechanisms that allow them to communicate their needs, wants and concerns. This opens up a whole new world of opportunity for the child to interact, learn, play and communicate. Parents are given training in using this technology with their child.

Population(s) Served

Often children who are non-verbal with profound cognitive and physical disabilities do not make therapeutic progress at a rate that is immediately perceivable. It may often take up to a year or two to establish a solid understanding of things like cause and effect relationships. These children are often denied additional therapy because it seems they have plateaued or that their gains are not significant. Parents also have difficulty including these children in activities of daily living at home because they are not sure how to adapt the environment, nor do they have the equipment to accommodate their child’s physical and cognitive deficits. With the proper equipment and training, a parent can carry over techniques learned in therapy to help in their child’s progress. Because of this need, we created the Inclusion House where children with severe neuro-motor disorders can learn how to participate in household activities with assistive technology. Through the use of adaptive household items, children can help with tasks like peeling an apple or blending a smoothie. Parents learn how to bring these activities back home to integrate their child’s therapy into daily life.

Population(s) Served

Volunteer physicians hold clinic hours at MCDC once a month to assist therapists with a child’s plan of treatment. An orthopedist consults with children who have gross motor concerns to recommend equipment and assess progress. Learning disability evaluations and developmental neurological exams are overseen by a pediatrician.

An on-site full-time medical psychologist works with children experiencing behavioral issues and learning concerns. She sits down with children and parents to resolve issues, prescribe medication if necessary and determine if the child might need additional therapies. Our doctors, therapists and social workers meet monthly as a multidisciplinary team to share results and progress with parents.

Population(s) Served

Our social workers are with your family every step of the process, from intake to discharge. A social worker is usually the first person from MCDC you will speak with about receiving therapy. Before we create the best plan of treatment for your child, he or she will receive an evaluation to determine the needs. Your social worker will schedule your child’s evaluation and pair you with a therapist. The therapist will spend time observing your child and follow the evaluation procedure to determine what therapy services will most benefit your child.

From there, your social worker provides case management throughout your plan of treatment. As needed, your social worker can provide individual and group counseling for your child and your family, help you carry out treatment recommendations and assist in using community resources.

Population(s) Served

In addition to our core therapies and services, we offer programs to integrate therapy into life outside of the McMains Children's Developmental Center. Our goal is to make our families' lives a little bit easier each day. We have a Wheels to Succeed adapted bike program, a Capable Arts summer camp, an annual Canoe trip and several other programs to supplement our therapy services.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of unduplicated children receiving services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number shows how many children who have received services at McMains Children's Developmental Center. While many children receive more than one service at the Center, each child is counted once.

Number of evaluations provided in physical, occupational, educational, and speech/language therapies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

An evaluation is provided with each child to assess what that child's level of functioning and what their needs are to address. A child may receive an evaluation per discipline.

Number of individual therapy sessions provided in physical, occupational, educational, and speech/language therapies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people receiving information or referral recommendations to assist a child

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Social Work & Case Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The social work department provides information to adults who call wanting information about the services in the community and/or services at the Center that are needed for a child.

Number of children who have met their goals and have been discharged from therapy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

When a child achieves her/his goals in therapy and is discharged, s/he becomes more independent at home, in school, or in the community. This number reflects when a child meets goals or within 80%.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The McMains Children's Developmental Center's mission is to advance the quality of life for children and their families by providing physical, developmental, academic and communication services. The overall goal is to help children become as independent as they possibly can through individual therapies and to help strengthen the families since a child does not exist in isolation. The Center assists children from birth to 18 in East Baton Rouge and surrounding parishes in need of the therapy services offered by the McMains Children’s Developmental Center. Any child who is having difficulty at home, in school, and/or the community may qualify for services. The Center sees children with cerebral palsy, autism, learning disabilities, ADHD, behavior issues, genetic or chromosome abnormalities, syndromes, sensory disorders, toe-walking, developmental delays, or other developmental disabilities. The Center accepts all children regardless of race, gender, and socio-economic level.

The McMains Children's Developmental Center's services include physical, occupational, speech/language, and educational therapies along with follow up orthopedic care, social work and psychological services. Each child receives an initial evaluation. If a child requires therapy, individual goals are developed and the child begins therapy. The Center also offers learning disability assessments as well as several other programs including an adaptive bike program, a Capable Arts Camp, Annual Canoe Trip at Tickfaw State Park, Capable Gardening program, and the Capable Play program. Capable Play is when a child with severe disabilities and his/her parent enter a six-week program which not only provides adaptive equipment, but also the training necessary on how to include the child in every day family activities around the house, game night, and literacy activities. In addition, Parent Support Groups, Sibling Support Groups, and Social Skill Groups are available when needed.

The McMains Children’s Developmental Center will be celebrating its 65th anniversary in March 2019. Because we are the longest running, locally operated, nonprofit pediatric outpatient clinic, we are uniquely qualified to continue serving families in our community. We have a legacy of improving the lives of children and their families. Our therapists continue to provide high quality services by continuing to stay abreast of current research and practices. We are also one of the only clinics that also addresses family needs through case management and family programs, including Annual Canoe Trip, Capable Gardening program, Capable Arts Camp, and Wheels to Succeed Adaptive Bike program. We are one of the only clinics who continue to assist all children regardless of their ability to pay and do not limit the number of children supported by the Medicaid program.

Since our doors opened in 1954, over 5500 children have received services at the Center. Over the years, programs have been added according to the needs of the community and our families. For example, the Capable Play program is the only one of its kind in Louisiana. The assistive technology, family programs, and educational therapy continue to set us apart from other pediatric outpatient clinics. Many of those discharged from the Center have gone on to graduate from high school and college, hold jobs successfully, and own their own homes. We plan to continue to meet the needs of the community by creating unique programs which will continue to assist children in becoming active members of society. We also hope to enlarge our facility, allowing us to add more staff and treat more children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Families are always welcome to share their concerns and opinions.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Concerns were noted with families that many did not have appropriate car seats for their children. We are now working with another nonprofit to provide them.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

McMains Children's Developmental Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

McMains Children's Developmental Center

Board of directors
as of 9/10/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Linda Spain

Angela Adolph

Sebastian Alvarez

Shaune Berthelot

Cindy Bishop

Jenny Hebert

Karen Kennedy

Bradley Lowe

Emily Mayo

Jay McMains

Michael McNulty

Mike Sorrells

Linda Spain

Troy Villa

Karen Young

Jacki Bergeron

Emily Rodriguez