United Way of Southeast Louisiana

aka UWSELA   |   New Orleans, LA   |  http://www.unitedwaysela.org

Mission

United Way of Southeast Louisiana’s mission is to eradicate poverty in our region. Our vision is for equitable communities where all are healthy, educated, and financially stable. We find expert, local partners who are aligned with our Blueprint for Prosperity and believe in collaboration and accountability. We fund trusted nonprofit service providers through our collective impact model. We advocate for bipartisan policy that drives systems-level change. When you invest in your community through United Way, you help more children succeed in school, more families lead healthy lives, and more people grow their incomes to become financially stable. Together, we make more impact than any one of us could create alone when we work toward a shared goal – eradicating poverty.

Ruling year info

1952

President and CEO

Mr. Michael Williamson

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

Ms. Charmaine Caccioppi

Main address

2515 Canal St

New Orleans, LA 70119 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

72-0471369

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our most recent data shows 19% of Louisiana’s population is living in poverty. The federal poverty line varies between individuals [$11,800] and families [$24,300 for a family of four], leaving these households with limited resources. However, it fails to capture many individuals and families who struggle to afford basic needs; housing, child care, health care, food and transportation. ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) identifies the struggle of an additional 30% of Southeast Louisiana households, comprised of hard-working taxpayers who don’t fit the traditional idea of poverty given their employment status. ALICE households live paycheck to paycheck – unable to save; often one health emergency, one car repair or one harsh storm away from poverty. In Louisiana, 49% of households earn below the living wage, compared to 53% in our Southeast region; which includes the seven parishes of Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany, St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Tangiaphoa & Washington

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Health

Fill a prescription or buy groceries. Schedule a therapy visit or pay for a car repair. These impossible choices are a daily reality for many households in Southeast Louisiana who lack access to resources they need to lead healthy lives. United Way is fighting to help individuals get – and stay – healthy by funding programs that help domestic violence survivors, provide mental and behavioral counseling, offer free medical services, and more.

Population(s) Served

Every child deserves the opportunity to succeed in school and life. And yet, thousands of children in Southeast Louisiana lack the support they need to enter school ready to learn, read on grade level, stay on track in school, graduate high school, and find a career.

By funding education programs across our region, leading community collaborations, and advocating for critical funding and policy changes, we’re fighting to shift the odds and create pathways to prosperity for all children in our community.

Population(s) Served

Nearly half of households in our region don’t earn enough to afford the basics. When so many families are living in poverty or one unexpected emergency from falling into poverty, our entire community suffers.

United Way funds programs across our seven-parish service region that help people secure and maintain living wage jobs, build their financial capability skills, obtain assets, and achieve economic stability. One of our signature programs, the J. Wayne Leonard Prosperity Center, is housed in our home office and supports low-income residents through financial education and coaching, credit building and counseling, benefits screening, income tax assistance, and more.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Children's Basic Needs are met

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - CASA New Orleans, Children’s Bureau, Youth Service Bureau, Family Violence St. Bernard, Good Samaritan, New Orleans Family Justice Alliance, YMCA GNO, SAFE, Communities in Schools

Individuals acquired necessary skills or services to overcome barriers to employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - Community Works of LA, New Orleans Family Justice Center, YEP, STARC, Project Homecoming, Traveler’s Aid, Louisiana Green Corps, and YMCA of GNO

Chilren achieved mastery in gross/fine motor, cognitive, self-help and/or social emotional skills at the appropriate age

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - Kingsley House, YMCA of GNO, Regina Coeli, Royal Castle, Catholic Charities, East St Tammany Rainbow, N.O. Speech and Hearing Center, Dryades YMCA, LEH PRIME TIME, and Urban League

Number of students who demonstrate writing ability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - City Year, Urban League, Boy Scouts, Community Works of LA and YMCA of Bogalusa

Individuals are now able to acquire basic needs with current income

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - YEP and Catholic Charities

Individuals improved, maintained, or slowed down the deterioration of their mental health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Financial Stability

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners-ADAPT, Catholic Charities, Children’s Bureau, Jewish Family Services, Kingsley House, Plaquemines CARE, VIA LINK, Youth Service Bureau of St. Tammany, and New Orleans Family Justice Alliance

Individual participated in physical activity and/or food access/nutrition programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Financial Stability

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Households accessed basic emergency assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners - Southeast LA Legal Services, Our Daily Bread of Tangipahoa, Cancer Association of GNO, American Red Cross, Good Samaritan Ministry, and Travelers Aid

Provided food access to 117,381 Individuals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partner - Second Harvest Food Bank, Our Daily Bread

Information and Referral Calls through 2-1-1

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partner - VIA Link

Number of tax returns completed by volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Asset Building Coalition Partners - All volunteer tax preparers

Total amount of income tax refunded back to the community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of assets purchased through the Individual Development Account (IDA)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

IDA is a matched savings account that helps low-income individuals and families save money to acquire an economic asset that can be a foundation for long-term financial stability & self-sufficiency

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

United Way of Southeast Louisiana’s Bold Goal is to “Eradicate poverty in Southeast Louisiana” with a Bold Vision of “Equitable communities where all individuals are healthy, educated and financially stable”. We are laser focused on eradicating poverty to achieve our goals of Stability Today, Prosperity Tomorrow, Personal Wellness and Vibrant Communities.
Our bold vision takes a holistic approach to solving these problems through Collective Impact - which involves businesses, nonprofits, foundations, government, churches, schools and YOU coming together to break down silos, align programs and resources and set shared goals all focused on eradicating poverty in Southeast Louisiana.

The Blueprint for Prosperity is a plan to move people out of poverty in our region and requires a change in the way our entire community approaches the issue of eradicating poverty by creating pathways for prosperity for generations to come. The Blueprint focus on four priority outcomes we are trying to achieve and guiding principles that inform our work: Stability Today: All families have the skills, resources and opportunities to access basic needs Prosperity Tomorrow: All families have the social, educational, and financial assets to create a better future Personal Wellness: People of all ages enjoy a high quality of life and wellbeing Vibrant Communities: All communities are safe, thriving, and equitable United Way SELA and all partners commit to a set of Guiding Principles that guide our work: Connectivity – our efforts are coordinated to create pathways of prosperity that are trusted, culturally appropriate, accessible, and without bias Equity – We strive to lift up all people and to eliminate systemic barriers to prosperity Lived Experience - We amplify the voices of those we are serving and allow their needs and aspirations to guide our work Long Term Commitment - We commit to continuing our work until the cycle of poverty is broken, communities are thriving, and people are living prosperously Shared Responsibility - success requires the unique contributions of the entire community, including individuals, families, schools, nonprofits, the faith-based community, funders, governments, and the private sector. System Change - We embrace our work as holistic and dynamic, impacting people, place, practice, and policy. United Way of Southeast Louisiana strategies include the 4I’s Invest – We invest in programs and collaborations that are focused on poverty eradication and expend resources in line with our outcomes framework and guiding principles. Align Program Grants with the prosperity outcomes framework, population-level indicators, and guiding principles Collaboration Grants, designed to support groups of relevant stakeholders taking a collaborative approach to systems change Inspire – Encourage others to adopt the poverty eradication agenda. We are laser focused on public policy as a means to eradicate poverty, while educating businesses and donors on the importance of tackling the root causes of poverty Inform – Share knowledge and innovative practices - ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report, we have changed the narrative on who is struggling in Southeast Louisiana and informing our region and State on our progress through our Prosperity Dashboard that provides a data view of specific poverty indicators. Initiate – Create new collaboration initiatives where there are gaps. United Way SELA launched in 2016 its’ first Prosperity Center to provide financial capability services to residents in all seven parishes. UWSELA serves as backbone for the Grade Level Reading Campaign & Louisiana Prisoner Reentry Initiative

United Way of Southeast Louisiana uses best practices in grant-making and collaboration, and uses the Collective Impact model to bring partners together around common strategies and goals. We fund and convene coalitions of community partners who directly implement strategies that are focused on poverty eradication. By convening community stakeholders, our community co-created our Blueprint for Prosperity, giving voice to the needs of the people in our seven parishes.
We have a strong Board of Directors that are committed and rooted in our community, a staff of 50 that are experts in their field, and community volunteers that guide and provide oversight within committees that lend their expertise and knowledge to advance the strategies and goals to eradicate poverty. United Way SELA currently funds 60 programs and seven collaborations, and operates a Prosperity Center that provides financial capability services all aimed at eradicating poverty.

Through United Way’s internal initiatives; Grade Level Reading, Louisiana Prisoner Re-entry Initiative, the Prosperity Center, Hands On Volunteer Center, and our funded programs and collaborations, United Way has served 1,333,658 residents throughout the seven parishes of Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, Plaquemines, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, and Washington.
Our funding to program partners yielded the following results for the July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019 year:
Stability Today
• 4,131 Children had basic needs met
• 543 Individuals acquired the necessary skills or services to overcome barriers to employment
• 265 Individuals secured and maintained stable, living-wage employment

Prosperity Tomorrow

• 3,068 Children achieved mastery in in gross/fine motor, cognitive, self-help, and/or social/emotional skills at the appropriate age
• 1,302 Students are on track for graduation (via promotion to the next grade)
• 402 Students were promoted to the next grade level
• 303 Individuals secured and maintained stable, living-wage employment
• 1,022 Individuals are now able to acquire basic needs with current income

Personal Wellness

• 8,874 Individuals improved, maintained, or slowed down the deterioration of their mental health
• 640 Individuals have quality health insurance
• 12,823 Individuals participated in physical activity and/or food access/nutrition programs
• 112 Individuals successfully managed their addictive behaviors
• 16,141 Households accessed basic emergency assistance
• 117,381 individuals received food through foodbanks
• VIA LINK provided 2-1-1 information and referrals to 29,369 callers
• Percent of recidivism for target offenders –only 2 participants recidivated out of 28 of clients served

J. Wayne Leonard Prosperity Center 2018-2019 Results
One-stop financial stability center offering an array of programming to the citizens of New Orleans including financial education, coaching, credit building and counseling, benefits screening, and income tax assistance.
•$1,500 average increase in savings within six months
•1,542 tax returns prepared (Prosperity Center only)
•$603 average debt reduction
•91 individuals established or increased their credit score with an average improvement of 42 points within three months
•65 financial education workshops
•72 clients opened a bank account (including IDA)
•$3,515,779.29 in asset ownership/purchases through the IDA Project
• 44 Assets purchased – 10 businesses, 26 homes, 7 vehicles,
•241coaching sessions

Financials

United Way of Southeast Louisiana
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Southeast Louisiana

Board of directors
as of 7/10/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gary Lorio

Community Volunteer

Term: 2019 - 2020

Terrell Boynton

DXC Technologis

Lori Barthelemy

Hancock Whitney

Karin Stafford Bird

UPS

David Francis

NOLA Media Group

Norma Grace

Community Volunteer

Elwood Cahill

Sher Garner Cahill

Michael Hecht

GNO Inc.

Bob Kimbro

Community Volunteer

Catherine McRae

Community Volunteer

Marian Pierre

Crescent Guardian Inc.

Adrienne Slack

Federal Reserve Bank

Tod Smith

WWL-TV / WUPL-TV / NW15

Michael Todd

Griffin, Todd & Associates, LLC.

Lacey Conway

Latter & Blum

Melanie Craig

People's Health

Gary Lorio

Hancock Whitney

Rick Young

Shell

Takeisha Davis

NO East Hospital

Mike Edwards

Enterprise Holdings

Elizabeth Frost

Chalmette Refining

Derrick Martin

Algiers Economic Development Foundation

Scott Reitan

Pan-American Life Insurance

Robert Tanner

Rayburn Correctional Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes