Special Olympics Louisiana, Inc.

aka Special Olympics Louisiana   |   Covington, LA   |  www.laso.org

Mission

The mission of Special Olympics is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.

Ruling year info

1973

President & Chief Executive Officer

Mr. John Guzzardo

Main address

46 Louis Prima Dr., Suite A

Covington, LA 70433 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

72-0706608

NTEE code info

Special Olympics (N72)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As evident throughout history, people in societies around the globe hold many misperceptions and negative attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Negative attitudes have been shown to be barriers to inclusion for people with ID in the community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sports and Competition

Special Olympics offers training and competition opportunities for every athlete regardless of gender, age or ability. SOLA athletes participate in approximately annually, and approximately 90 different training schools are held each year for the coaches who participate. The rules accommodate all levels of athletic ability and enable participants to compete against athletes of similar skills so that all have a fair chance to win. No matter what the interest, there is a sport for everyone some sports offered are:  Aquatics - Athletics - Golf - Basketball - Horseshoes - Bocce - Powerlifting - Bowling - Softball – Volleyball-etc.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Despite severe need and higher health risks, people with intellectual disabilities are often denied health services and die on average 16 years sooner than the general population.

Special Olympics Health, made possible by the Golisano Foundation, is creating a world where people with intellectual disabilities have every opportunity to be healthy.

Inclusive health means people with ID are able to take full advantage of the same health programs and services available to people who do not have ID.

Our goal is to improve access to quality health care for 11 million people with ID. The changes required to reach this milestone have the potential to unlock health care and services for all people with ID worldwide. When people with ID have access to health services, they also have more opportunities for education, employment, sports, and other pathways to reach full participation in society.

​Impaired coping abilities and communication skills – common among people with ID – can mask health concerns. This can lead to a breakdown in the quality of health care and health education, for people with ID. Over the past two decades, Special Olympics has improved the health of people with ID around the world by collaborating with our athletes, health care providers, community organizations, universities, and governments.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Special Olympics Unified Schools empowers youth and educators to be leaders of change. By playing and learning we will create a more inclusive world.

​Students of all abilities have the power to positively impact their school communities by promoting social inclusion. Learn how you can make a difference.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Through sports training and competitions, Special Olympics helps people with intellectual disabilities (ID) achieve joy, acceptance and success. They gain the confidence that comes with achievement. They feel empowered. Athletes lead the way as the voices of the movement, taking on meaningful roles in their communities and educating the world about the potential of people with ID. These athletes drive the Special Olympics movement forward with their insights and contributions, and are shining examples of what it means to be a leader.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Certificate of Accreditation from Special Olympics Inc. 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, Family relationships, People with learning disabilities, Low-income people, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Sports and Competition

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community initiatives in which the organization participates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities, Low-income people

Related Program

Sports and Competition

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities, Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Inclusive Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, People with learning disabilities, Low-income people

Related Program

Sports and Competition

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Special Olympics Louisiana strives to foster inclusive communities for people with and without intellectual disabilities through innovative sport, health, wellness and leadership opportunities for Special Olympics athletes, their families and society as a whole.

In order to further advance the Special Olympics movement in Louisiana, SOLA must increase the number of registered athletes who participate, increase the depth and quality of programs available to participants, further educate communities, and increase monetary resources in order to sustain and secure long-term viability of programs.

Special Olympics is among the most well-known and well-respected brands in the country. SOLA has an extremely passionate, dedicated staff and over 10,000 volunteers who not only believe in the mission but strive to live by its core values. With a strong fundraising arm and corporate development team, who have consistently proven a capacity for sustainable growth, the future looks bright. SOLA has a variety of corporate sponsors, partners, and positive relationships on the local, state, and even national level. As new opportunities and technologies present themselves, SOLA will strive to remain at the forefront of the industry by continuing to strengthen the brand and expand the organization's reach and impact.

Over the past 50 years, Special Olympics Louisiana has changed the lives and hopes of thousands of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities throughout Louisiana.

For athletes and their families, Special Olympics Louisiana has opened doors to unimagined possibilities. We currently serve over 12,000 registered athletes who compete in more than 120 competitions throughout Louisiana annually. All 64 counties are served and over 500 schools are engaged through unified sports programs. We provide more than 1,500 free health screenings and continue to educate our athletes and communities on the benefits of healthy lifestyles and provide leadership opportunities for our athletes.

For those who volunteer, support, and sponsor the movement, unprecedented pride and hope for a brighter future prevail. Communities continue to be transformed for the schools, towns and counties who host events, creating a more just and understanding environment of inclusion for all, demonstrating the value of every human being to the world.

Special Olympics Louisiana will continue to be a transformative movement so the next 50 years will cultivate a new generation of inclusion and unity, generate permanent change in perspective, and allow the power of sport to transform lives and open minds.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Special Olympics Louisiana, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Special Olympics Louisiana, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Peyton Lambert

Locke Lord, LLP

Term: 2019 - 2021

Fallon Buckner

Assistant Executive Director, LHSAA

Paul Tanguis

CPA, CGMA, CVA Tanguis Accounting Services

Jim Pittman

Orleans Parish Medical Society

Brandon McNabb

CFO-This Mama Wines

Bradley Cook

Sterling Properties

John Derbas

Retired-FBI

Claris Smith

Cooper Law Firm, LLC

Maranda White

Octagon Media

Emmett Robbins

Supply Chain Client Services Mgr.

Jill Egle

Athlete

Lisa Helms

Talent Collective-Recruiter

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/21/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.