Alabama Casa Network, Inc.

Speaking Up for Abused and Neglected Children

Opelika, AL   |  https://alabamacasa.org/

Mission

The mission of the Alabama CASA Network, Inc. is to equip and empower CASA programs to advocate for all of Alabama’s abused and neglected children.

Ruling year info

1997

State Executive Director

Mr. Jimmy Hill

Main address

P.O. Box 2524

Opelika, AL 36803 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

72-1374587

NTEE code info

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Each year, there are more than 14,000 children in the foster care system in Alabama. The Alabama CASA Network provides abused, neglected, or abandoned dependent children in Alabama up to the age of 19 with a trained, caring volunteer to advocate for the child's best interest in all judiciary dependency proceedings. These children are typically the victims of crime; at least one of the following – physical abuse, sexual abuse, medical neglect, domestic violence, drug abuse, etc. These children need a CASA volunteer to work in conjunction with the judges, lawyers and social workers in their lives to help ensure they receive appropriate care and support while navigating the court, child welfare, and foster care systems.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CASA/GAL Training Program

Orientation and training of volunteers appointed by a judge to serve as a Court Appointed Special Advocate or Guardian Ad Litem in representing the best interests of abused and neglected children in the court system.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to increase the number and quality of CASA volunteers serving abused, abandoned, or neglected children in Alabama. To meet this goal, we must increase the efficiency and stability of the local CASA programs. Financial support by state & federal grants, corporate & foundation giving and individual donors allows local CASA programs to achieve the following goals and objectives through recruiting, screening, training, supporting, and tracking CASA volunteers as they serve child victims in Alabama.

Goal #1: To increase the number of children served by CASA programs in Alabama
Measurable Objective: To increase the number of volunteers available to support existing programs and implement new CASA programs in Alabama

Goal #2: To improve the quality of services provided by CASA volunteers
Measurable Objective: Improve the accuracy and completion of court reports to include increase submissions by local CASA program staff and volunteers

Goal #3: Track accurate volunteer and client data with Optima Software.
Measurable Objective: Increase accuracy of case management and children served, ultimately to decrease the amount of time children spend in temporary dependency placements.

Goal #4: To provide training, quality assurance and technical assistance from the state office.
Measurable Objective: Increase the quality and number of programs in Alabama and the amount of pass-through funding to local CASA programs

For Goal #1:
Strategy: Launch a Volunteer Campaign to increase roles, gifts in kind and overall community engagement.
Strategy: Provide outreach events to engage the general public with additional pre-service opportunities for volunteer training.

Goal #2:
Strategy: Assess capacity of local programs for additional staffing needs and review of wage adjustments and/or hours proportionately as appropriate for current staff.
Strategy: Provide increased professional development training for volunteers and staff.

Goal #3:
Strategy: Facilitate training and supervise staff and volunteers to accurately track and enter data in Optima Software.

Goal #4:
Strategy: Travel to each CASA office for training assistance, site visits, technical assistance, provide a longer and more in-depth state conference, increase the number of local program staff meetings and trainings. Delivery of services will be made available with multiple opportunities for on-site trainings, webinars, conference calls, site-visits and quarterly trainings and conferences.

Alabama CASA Network provides abused, neglected, or abandoned dependent children in Alabama up to the age of 19 with a trained, caring volunteer to advocate for the child's best interest in all judiciary dependency proceedings. These children are typically the victims of crime; at least one of the following – physical abuse, sexual abuse, medical neglect, domestic violence, drug abuse, etc. These children need a CASA volunteer to work in conjunction with the judges, lawyers and social workers in their lives to help ensure they receive appropriate care and support while navigating the court, child welfare, and foster care systems.

Highly trained CASA volunteers conduct independent, objective investigations into the circumstances of a child’s life, interview all relevant adults and parties to the case as well as maintain regular in person contact with the child or children. Additionally, advocates review all pertinent legal, medical, psychological or other records, and make recommendations to the court as to what is in the best interest of the child. CASA volunteers then monitor the case, link children to services, and report to the court until the child is placed in a safe, permanent home.

Volunteers are the unique element in the child welfare mix. The one-on-one contact between a child who needs a stable relationship with a caring adult and a volunteer who is doing the job without compensation and who has no competing interests, is substantially different than contact between a child and an agency staff member who is carrying a drawer full of equally demanding cases.

CASA volunteers typically handle only one or two cases at a time—and commit to staying on the case until the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. Ninety-five percent of children with CASA volunteers stay out of foster care long-term (defined as three years or more). In addition, children with a CASA volunteer are more likely to be adopted.

CASA volunteers truly change the lives of the children they serve.

Court Appointed Special Advocates are necessary in the communities they serve and to the child victims they advocate for. Alabama CASA Network supports local programs who are deploying volunteers each and every day. Since its creation by a family court judge in Seattle, CASA has become one of the most effective programs of its kind. There are 15 programs in Alabama serving 20 counties and over 1,000 programs around the country. It is a unique blend of private support, public needs and the kind of people power that comes from over 425 volunteers in Alabama and over 70,000 volunteers nationwide, all committed to the rights of every child in the foster care and child welfare system.

A child with a CASA volunteer is more likely to find a safe, permanent home, more likely to be adopted, half as likely to re-enter foster care, substantially less likely to spend time in long-term foster care, and more likely to have a plan for permanency.

Children with a CASA volunteer receive more help while they are navigating the child welfare and foster care systems. There are more services ordered for children with a CASA volunteer, and they are more likely to have a consistent adult presence in their life. CASA volunteer advocates spend significantly more time with the child than a paid attorney; however, CASA volunteers aim to work alongside social workers and guardian ad litems to help assist them and be an extra set of eyes and ears. CASA volunteers improve representation of children, submit written court reports and are highly effective in having their recommendations for services adopted by the court.
Children with a CASA volunteer do better in school and are more likely to pass all their courses. They are also less likely to have poor conduct in school and are less likely to be expelled.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Alabama Casa Network, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Alabama Casa Network, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ellen Proctor

Encompass Health

Term: 2022 - 2024

Ellen Proctor

Encompass Health

Jennifer Hardin

Warren Averett

Phillip Rodgers

Brasfield Gorrie

Amy Savoie

Protective Insurance Company

Charles (Chad) Smith

ISI Theraputic Services

Luke Coley

Attorney at Law

Rima Hartman

Bressler, Amery & Ross, PC

Lauren Keet

Warren Averett

Latasha Durr

CASA of Lee County

Roger Williams

Patterson, Prince & Associates, PC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.