PLATINUM2024

Blaine County Hunger Coalition, Inc.

Building community through food

aka The Hunger Coalition   |   Bellevue, ID   |  www.thehungercoalition.org

Mission

The Hunger Coalition builds a healthy community through access to good food and addresses the root causes of food insecurity in collaboration with key partners.

Notes from the nonprofit

We appreciate the belief our supporters have displayed in our programs and consider the financial, technical, professional and volunteer aid we have received a critical part of our success as an organization through the years. Additionally, our key partnerships allow us to meet our ambitious goals while keeping costs at a minimum. The result is a strong, dedicated organization striving to make a tangible change in our community, and beyond.

Ruling year info

2004

Co-Executive Director

Brooke Pace-Mckenna

Co-Executive Director

Naomi Spence

Main address

110 Honeysuckle Street

Bellevue, ID 83313 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

72-1582755

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are some grim realities underneath the glitz of our resort community. The high cost of living – with food costs ranked as the 6th highest in the nation – compounded by the seasonality of employment, makes it extremely difficult for working people to scrape by. The housekeeper can't afford lunch. The preschool teacher commutes from Twin Falls. The front desk staff is on food stamps. The Hunger Coalition -aka Bloom Community Food Center- is a hunger relief organization in Blaine County that makes sure these people have access to good food year round. We feed 28% of Blaine County or 5,869 local people per year but a food assessment survey indicated that 51% of our population is food insecure or one crisis away from it. We're working to move beyond the band-aid approach of emergency food assistance and instead have begun designing new solutions that buck the stigma of food assistance and address the root causes of hunger to create lasting solutions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healthy Food Pantry

Good food is paramount to strength and well-being. If you’re facing obstacles like a family or medical crisis, unemployment, or the high cost of living in Blaine County, don’t hesitate to fill up on fresh, nutritious staples from our food pantry at no cost to you. The pantry is arranged like a grocery center where you can fill up a cart with healthy food such as milk, eggs, frozen meat, fresh fruits and vegetables, and canned goods. Much of our food comes from our Food Rescue program, where we recover fresh produce and perishable items from our local grocery stores.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

If you are a parent looking for compassionate support for your infant, please ask us about our Infant Formula Initiative. Implemented in 2005, The Hunger Coalition’s Infant Formula Initiative ensures babies requiring supplemental nutrition can receive formula every month during their first year. As a supplement to the Women, Infants, and Children program (WIC), the Infant Formula Initiative provides essential nutrition during the critical first months of an infant’s life. To date, the program has distributed 24,990 bottles of infant formula to local babies!

The Papoose Club and St. Luke’s Wood River Medical Center have been vital partners in this program over the years and we are truly grateful for their support.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden connect our community over the shared joy of growing good food. Through education and agriculture, these feel-good growing spaces help inspire a resilient future for all members of Blaine County.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

We believe it is essential for children of all ages to have easy access to healthy food in order to learn, grow, and participate in their community with confidence. Daily Bites provides healthy kid friendly snack pantries in easily accessible locations for all children throughout Blaine County.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Hunger Coalition and The Community Library collaborate to bring a food truck and bookmobile to isolated neighborhoods throughout Blaine County. In order to prevent the summer slide in nutrition and learning, over 18 partners bring enrichment activities designed to keep bodies and minds healthy and active and prepared to re-enter school in the fall.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Bloom Kitchen and Cafe is the platform for our Cooking Club, cooking and nutrition classes, and weekly community meals. Our neighbors gather twice a week for a home-cooked, nutritious and free meals in our cafe. It's an opportunity for folks to enjoy good food, good conversation, and community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Unemployed people
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Idaho's Brightest Star 2016

Idaho Governor's Office

Ann & Doug Christensen Humanitarian Award 2009

Humanitarian Award

Idaho Walmart Associate Choice Award 2011

Walmart

Summer Sunshine Award 2017

USDA Summer Feeding Program

Best Nonprofit 2020

Idaho Mountain Express -Best of the Valley Award

Best Nonprofit 2021

Idaho Mountain Express -Best of the Valley Award

Best Nonprofit 2022

Idaho Mountain Express- Best of the Valley Award

Humanitarian of the Year 2023

Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Seniors, Immigrants and migrants, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

Healthy Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Pounds of food distributed last year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of meals served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This statistic utilizes the USDA standard of 1.3 pounds of food per meal.

Number of children receiving food assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of pounds of food rescued through grocery store rescue, food drives, garden and farm donations and gleaning efforts.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With the rapidly evolving needs of our community post-COVID, our staff and board developed the following goals for the 2023-2025 work period. They address the two parts of our mission a) provide food access b) address the root causes of hunger:

Goal 1: Program Evolution & Excellence- By Dec 31, 2025, THC root cause programs will complete intensive piloting, including a minimum of 30 stakeholder engagements, to advance long-term community impact
Goal 2: Crisis Planning- By Dec 31, 2025, THC will have one internal master plan for strategic crisis responses in areas of program, finance, operations
Goal 3: Collective Impact- By Dec 31, 2025, THC will invest in pilot community collective impacts with at least 3 community organizations to better address root cause work
Goal 4: Leadership Development- By Dec 31, 2025, THC will mentor 5 people from underrepresented demographics in leadership skills to build equitable representation in Blaine County
Goal 5: Staff Housing- By Dec 31, 2024, THC will explore THC staff housing stability options

1. Expand programming in the community kitchen and gardens to increase mental health opportunities
2. Support youth through a network of community partners focused on educational development and equity in schools
3. Restructure case management to provide unique, accessible mental health support in our cafe and green spaces
4. Survey our community on their understanding of root cause issues and develop greater awareness and engagement based on response
5. Capture lessons learned from major crises responses since 2020
6. Build a succession plan for future generations
7. Build crisis response plan considering internal and external threats like finances, communications, legal, and staffing
8. Financially support sister organizations that address the root causes of food insecurity like education, childcare, and housing and thus, prevent people from needing food assistance in the first place
9. Build a leadership track for rising leaders within our organization that can be shared with partner organizations
10. Promote civic engagement with community leaders who are interested in running for office or joining boards
11. Offer mentorship to younger nonprofits to strengthen the social service ecosystem
12. Increase staff housing stability while working alongside other community housing efforts to mitigate the impact of staff turnover

The Hunger Coalition has grown from an all-volunteer organization supporting the efforts of other social service agencies, to a full-fledged community food center and critical community assistance organization with twelve inter-related programs and twenty dedicated staff members focused on ending hunger in our community. Since our founding in 2003, we have created a highly effective, innovative, holistic and community-based approach to the provision of food assistance. For community members struggling to make ends meet, The Hunger Coalition is often the only available and accessible resource keeping them from malnutrition and hunger.

The Hunger Coalition has experienced more growth and success in the past three years than in the history of the organization. Even with COVID behind us, our numbers are higher than ever. We know that we must move beyond emergency food assistance if we are ever going to make a dent in food insecurity in our community.

A major shift in our strategy began in 2015 when we undertook a massive Community Food Assessment that, among other things, determined that affordability is the biggest factor preventing people from accessing more healthy food (versus availability and accessibility). In fact, we have the 6th highest food costs in the nation.

In addition, COVID proved what happens when nearly half of our community experiences the same crisis at once. Overnight, our numbers nearly quadrupled, but our staff and board were able to adapt our service model to keep pace with the need. Seeing so many people experience food insecurity at once, and seeing the need remain even in 2022, has further fueled our desire to tackle root cause work. Our full attention has moved towards addressing the second part of our mission - promoting solutions to the underlying causes of hunger in collaboration with key partners.

Luckily, in 2019 we started a capital campaign to renovate Bloom Community Food Center- a holistic and multifaceted solution to hunger. The13,000 sq ft facility includes a nex-gen food pantry, community kitchen and cafe, year round greenhouses, and more. The facility, in addition to our community farm and garden, children's food truck, and youth internship program will fuel our ambitious goals for the future.

Our new Strategic Work Plan will provide clear direction for the immediate future while setting a solid foundation for the future growth of the organization. We track specific, measurable goals on a monthly, quarterly and annual basis to gauge our progress.

This is a pivotal time for The Hunger Coalition. Our success can be measured in the most talented, passionate, and diverse team we've ever had in place, our continued generous donors, strong volunteer core, and healthy balance sheet that has allowed us to invest in future generations and to dream big. Never in the history of the organization have we been more prepared to undertake a strategic plan of this scope. We're ready to feed the future.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Blaine County Hunger Coalition, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Blaine County Hunger Coalition, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Patti Zebrowski

N/A

Term: 2024 - 2024

Patti Zebrowski

Board Chair

Carter Cox

Vice Chair

Mariela Orihuela

Member

Luis Campos

Member

Deborah Van Law

Secretary

Erika Greenberg

Member

Randy Hall

Member

Kody Laggis

Treasurer

Ross Copperman

Member

Vicki Overfelt

Member

Fernanda Hausske

Member

Sarah Uhlenhopp

Member

John Hatzenbuehler

Member

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/23/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.