Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma

An Oklahoma where no one goes hungry

Oklahoma City, OK   |  http://www.regionalfoodbank.org

Mission

The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma's mission is to lead a network that provides nutritious food and pathways to self-sufficiency for people facing hunger.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since 1980, the Regional Food Bank has increased its programs and services to help close the hunger gap that exists for far too many Oklahomans. Oklahoma consistently ranks among the hungriest states in the United States. One in six Oklahomans has inconsistent access to food, which is why supporting the Regional Food Bank is so important. The Regional Food Bank is focused on ending hunger for hardworking families; feeding Oklahomans nutritious food; rescuing millions of pounds of good food from landfills; uniting community-based partners to drive change; and protecting federal programs that feed children, families and seniors. The majority of people served by the Regional Food Bank are chronically hungry children, seniors living on fixed incomes, and hardworking families who cannot make ends meet.

Ruling year info

1997

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Stacy Dykstra

Main address

3355 S. Purdue

Oklahoma City, OK 73137 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Oklahoma City Food Bank

EIN

73-1100380

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Oklahoma is one of the hungriest states in the nation. One in six Oklahomans lives with hunger, while one in four children in Oklahoma has inconsistent access to healthy food. The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma provides enough food to feed more than 136,000 Oklahomans every week, 37 percent of whom are children. Supporting the Regional Food Bank helps Oklahomans reach their potential. The majority of people served by the Regional Food Bank are chronically hungry children, seniors living on fixed incomes, and hard working families who cannot make ends meet.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agency Distribution, Capacity and Partnership

During our first year of operation, the Regional Food Bank distributed approximately 280,000 pounds of food to 45 charities – we now do that in three days. Since its inception in 1980, the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma has distributed more than 800 million pounds of food. Last year, the Food Bank distributed 50 million pounds of food. The Regional Food Bank works with a network of more than 1,300 community-based partner agencies and schools throughout central and western Oklahoma to distribute food to Oklahomans in need of food assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

These initiative programs work to ensure that hungry children in Oklahoma have access to nutritious food, allowing them to learn at the same rate as their peers, giving them hope for the future and an opportunity to break the cycle of poverty. The Regional Food Bank's Food for Kids Programs include: Backpack program, School Pantry Program, Kids Cafe and Summer Feeding.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Every day, older Oklahomans are faced with not having enough money to pay rent, utilities, medical bills and prescriptions. At times, support from family and friends is just not enough, and they are unable to stretch their dollar far enough to purchase enough food to sustain their health. Through the Senior Mobile Markets Program and Commodity Supplemental Food Program, the Regional Food Bank is helping Oklahoma’s seniors in need of food assistance. Through Senior Mobile Markets, the Regional Food Bank delivers food each month to seniors living in 18 Oklahoma Housing Authority sites in Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Seminole and Comanche counties. Each recipient receives a sack of nonperishable food items along with produce, refrigerated items, and bread when available. The Regional Food Bank assists with 18 Senior Mobile Markets and serves an average of 994 seniors a month, totaling 283,490 meals last year. The Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) works to improve the health of low-income seniors, age 60 or older, by supplementing their diets with nutritious USDA commodity foods. More than 3,000 Oklahoma seniors are enrolled in CSFP.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

The Regional Food Bank works with 14 collaborative Food & Resource Centers to reach targeted, underserved populations in urban and rural Oklahoma.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served through the Food for Kids Childhood Hunger Programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals for children and senior citizens produced in our on-site Production Kitchen.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Poundage of fresh foods procured and distributed to hungry Oklahomans.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community volunteers hosted annually at the Regional Food Bank.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hungry Oklahomans served through Food & Resource Centers.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As part of our commitment to efficient and effective program operations, the Regional Food Bank has developed three primary areas of focus.

Goal 1: Scale the Food & Resource Center Model to Broader Network of Public Pantry Partners.
While the FRC model has been tremendously successful during the last five years, the Regional Food Bank remains committed to efficient and effective operations.. As the fifth anniversary of the opening of the first Food & Resource Center approaches and the organization reaches a natural break in its FRC implementation, the organization is undergoing a full review of the Food & Resource Center model. This review, called FRC 2.0, is designed to identify lessons learned in the first phase of the FRC initiative in order to determine best how to scale this effort throughout the Regional Food Bank's 53-county service area.

Goal 2: Expand Child and Senior Meal Programs through the Optimization of our Production Kitchen and Expanded Community Partnerships.
The Regional Food Bank plans to expand its Summer Feeding Program to reach even more sites, especially in rural areas, which are developed with community partnerships like Boys & Girls Clubs, Salvation Army sites, and afterschool programs. The Regional Food Bank's addition of a new Production Kitchen has helped the Regional Food Bank increase its Summer Feeding Program by creating meals that are federally reimbursable through the Federal SFSP Program.

The Production Kitchen will also play a critical role in the expansion of the Senior Feeding Program. This year, the Regional Food Bank is piloting a new Senior Feeding meal program in conjunction with congregate feeding sites in the Oklahoma City metro area. The Regional Food Bank knows many seniors who attend daily feeding sites often do not have food outside of the meals they receive on site. This new program will help close the gap that exists by preparing frozen meals in our Production Kitchen, which are given to seniors who are at-risk of going hungry outside of congregate meals. These meals can be heated using a microwave or an oven.

Goal 3: Develop Health & Nutrition Partnerships.
During the next year, the Regional Food Bank will continue to leverage existing relationships with healthcare and nutrition partners, in addition to partnerships with others engaged in expanding access to healthy foods. These partnerships include relationships with Integris Health, Variety Care, RAIN and the Oklahoma City-County Health Department who both prescribe and help distribute healthy food to chronically ill patients. The Regional Food Bank will also continue to train OU medical residents in how to screen for food insecurity in patients. Integris, the Chickasaw Nation, OSU-OKC and the American Heart Association will continue to provide nutrition education and cooking demonstrations in FRCs. These partnerships help the Regional Food Bank advance its nutrition policy throughout the organization's programs and operations.

The Regional Food Bank has developed a set of steps for each focus area.

Goal 1: Scale the Food & Resource Center Model to Broader Network of Public Pantry Partners.
1) Conduct focus groups with existing Food & Resource Centers to assess lessons learned from the initiative's start-up phase. Use this information to shape continuous improvement options and scaling of the model across the Regional Food Bank's service area.
2) Conduct a capacity building survey in partnership with Feeding America to assess the specific areas where partners need to build capacity and barriers to expanding services and food distribution.
3) Hold an agency conference to obtain additional feedback on emerging new standards for agencies as part of scaling the Food & Resource Center model.
4) Development of a final plan for scaling the Food & Resource Center model to the rest of the Food Bank's public pantry partners.
5) Obtain feedback via surveys and in-person discussions from existing partner agencies and Food & Resource Centers on this proposed plan and use that feedback to finalize the plan.
6) Implement plan to transform broader network in alignment with Food & Resource Center concepts in FY18.

Goal 2: Expand Child and Senior Meal Programs through the Optimization of Production Kitchen and Expanded Community Partnerships:
Summer Feeding
1. Serve as a core partner and one of four hosts for Summer Feeding Programs in Oklahoma on the Oklahoma Children's Food Security Council.
2. Engage in community organizing activities throughout the third and fourth quarter to organize new partnerships for Summer Feeding and support the maintenance of existing partnerships.

Production and Distribution of Children's Meals
3. Develop and distribute frozen meals produced in the Regional Food Bank's Production Kitchen to all existing Kids Café sites, including those in rural areas.

Production and Distribution of Senior Meals
4. Finalize a partnership with a local senior social services organization to distribute Production Kitchen meals to seniors attending daily congregate feeding sites.

Goal 3: Develop Health & Nutrition Partnerships.
1. Continue and expand health provider partnerships.

2. Finalize and adopt a nutrition policy to guide the Regional Food Bank's overall efforts to impact the health of the clients we serve.

3. Develop a sustainable approach for the Farm to Food Bank project, which helps local farmers' meet their soil conservation goals. Integrate this pilot project with our Urban Harvest program, which provides fresh produce to partner agencies throughout our service areas.

The Regional Food Bank has 38 years of strong, successful collaborations with key partners in our state with an end goal of leveraging collaborative opportunities to help fight hunger in Oklahoma. The Regional Food Bank believes in the power of collaborative opportunities because it is only through collaboration that long-term projects can truly succeed. As a whole, these collaborative partnerships help the Regional Food Bank secure food and monetary donations, implement operational efficiencies to maximize resources and educate Oklahomans on hunger issues impacting our state.

Each year, the Regional Food Bank continues to expand its food distribution efforts in order to meet the growing need for emergency food assistance in our state. Last year, the Regional Food Bank served 52 million pounds of food, a four percent increase from the previous year. In addition to distributing food through 1,300 partner agencies and participating schools, the Regional Food Bank also continues to distribute food through 11 special, targeted programs designed to reach individuals who may not have access to the traditional emergency food network due to age, location, mobility or disability. As outlined in the progress section, each of these programs is also growing to help meet the demand for help in our state.

• Backpack Program: During the 2017-2018 fiscal year, the program served more than 20,000 chronically hungry children attending 480 elementary schools received weekly backpacks of food throughout the school year.

• Care and Share Family Box Program: The Care and Share Family Box Program focuses on rural communities with high levels of need and limited or no access to partner agencies. More than 5,000 Oklahomans in 5 areas received food.

• Food & Resource Centers: 15 Food & Resource Centers (FRCs) are increasing the amount of food distributed to hungry Oklahomans by offering expanded hours of access and client choice pantries throughout our service area. These FRCs served more than 3,000 unique individuals, including targeted high-risk populations per month.

• Fresh Food Mobile Market Program: Seven distribution sites specifically targeted to communities with high indicators of need are serving an average of 1,500 individuals each month.

• Fresh Rx: Three sites in conjunction with low-income medical clinics include healthy-living pantry boxes and fresh food distributions, with a goal of improving health outcomes through increased access to healthier food options.

• Kids Cafe: 53 Kids Cafe sites and afterschool snack programs provide a safe haven, enrichment activities and a snack or full meal daily after school to more than 6,200 at-risk children.

• OKDHS Pantry Program: The OKDHS Pantry Program is a partnership with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. Pre-packaged boxes of nonperishable food are provided each month to nearly 900 families in crisis situations in 51 counties.

• School Pantry Program: During the 2016-2017 academic year, the program served 6,500 secondary students struggling with hunger. These students received enough food for 460,000 meals through the 172 middle and high schools participating in the School Pantry Program.

• Senior Feeding Program: The Senior Feeding Program provides food assistance to close to 5,000 low-income seniors through senior mobile pantries, homebound delivery and a pantry box program.

• Summer Feeding Program: The Summer Feeding Program provides nutritious food to children in the summer months when school meals are not available. In Summer 2018, the Regional Food Bank hosted 120 feeding sites, serving more than 7,000 children.

• Urban Harvest: Urban Harvest is a sustainable gardening program that focuses on fresh food production for the Regional Food Bank's Fresh Rx Program and other partners.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ben Williams

Chesapeake Energy

Term: 2019 - 2020

Ben Williams

Brandon Brown

Jeremy Humphers

Melinda Newport

William Buergler

John Kapchinske

Kim Shoemake

Robert Clements

Linda Lawson

Sherry Barton

Kyle Essmiller

Brandon Long

JD Baker

Ray Haefele

Dave Lopez

Danny Barth

Michael Hart

Tressa Madden-McGill

Steve Merrill

Gloria Torres

Patti Neuhold-Ravikumar

Gary Woods

Phi Nguyen

Scott Wright

Collins Peck

Roxanne Pollard

Rhonda Sutton

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes