PLATINUM2024

Survivor Resource Network

Safer Survivors. Safer Communities.

aka SRN   |   Ponca City, OK   |  www.survivorresourcenetwork.org

Mission

The Survivor Resource Network empowers individuals, educates the community, and advocates for justice to end domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Ms. Tara Tyler

Main address

PO Box 85

Ponca City, OK 74602 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

73-1223880

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Rape Victim Services (F42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Survivor Resource Network, Inc. believes that survivors of family violence, both in the work force and at home, have a vital influence on the lives of their families and those around them. Therefore, the agency will work to oppose the use of violence and coercive control and support equality in all types of relationships and help survivors of intimate partner violence assume control over their own lives. SRN understands that the rural community in which it operates presents its own unique challenges and dedicates itself to removing those barriers to living safely and independently.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Survivor Resource Network - Laura House Shelter

SRN empowers individuals, educates the community and advocates for justice to end domestic violence and child abuse.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Sexual identity

Counseling, On-Scene Advocacy, Legal Advocacy, Child Advocacy, Sexual Assault Advocacy and Non-Resident Advocacy

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Sexual identity

Where we work

Awards

Standards for Excellence 2023

Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Survivor Resource Network - Laura House Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are committed to providing on-going trauma informed support services to survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking and their families as we understand that treating a whole person by taking into account past trauma and the resulting coping mechanisms is the best means of helping a survivor begin their recovery.

We are committed to providing confidential consultation to survivors and education to the community, government, and private social service, criminal justice, health, welfare, and other agencies.

We are committed to helping survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking acquire the information, resources and survival skills necessary to take control of their own lives.

We support and involve in our program survivors of all racial, social, ethnic, religious, economic, age groups and life styles.

Creating public awareness by using strategic and integrated messages to publicize our mission and our services. The more community stakeholders that are aware of our services - the more survivors that get support.

Increasing financial stability through a development of current resources and addition of new funders. Adding more clientele requires funding more dedicated staff and offering more programs and services.

Providing and measuring outcomes for staff and clients through feedback, assessments and reviews to make sure we are providing services that are on trend and relevant to the needs of our community.

Our agency's capabilities of meeting our goals lie with the utilization of our staff and board members.

The staff has increased consistent messaging on many social media platforms and increased participation at local community events to increase visibility. SRN has made lasting relationships with local tribal contacts, schools, and other local non-profit agencies. The administration developed newsletters and mailings to keep our agency in the thoughts of community stakeholders.

Our financial sustainability falls to our board members. They will continue to nurture positive emerging trends and enact changes according to various federal funders. Additionally, we have increased the functionality of our governance to allow for more active role in community engagement. The board members continue in their role of maintaining and operating our annual fundraising events.

The administrative staff continuously looks for gaps and areas for development with the staff and the agency programs.

After a review of community needs, SRN has created a new program for justice involved victims of domestic violence that creates a safe place to return to after being released from incarceration.

SRN gained a new community fundraising event in the form of a Summer Herb Festival that engages many local communities and offers the city an increase in tourism.

We were able to add a kennel and safe place for animals so survivors can bring their pets with them when fleeing their dangerous homes.

Our next goals are to update our webpage to a more streamlined resource for survivors and focus on the accessibility of our agency and it's programs for those that live with disabilities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Survivor Resource Network
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Survivor Resource Network

Board of directors
as of 02/13/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Julie Sheffield

Sheffield Travel

Term: 2021 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/30/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.