THE CENTER FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH PHYSICAL CHALLENGES LTD

Creating a community that fosters Hope, Health and Humanity

aka The Center   |   Tulsa, OK   |  www.tulsacenter.org

Mission

TO PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH PHYSICAL DISABILITIES TO ENHANCE THE QUALITY OF THEIR LIVES.

Ruling year info

1959

Executive Director

Wendi M. Cook-Fralick

Main address

815 S Utica Ave www.tulsacenter.org

Tulsa, OK 74104-____ USA

Show more contact info

EIN

73-6070545

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Provide opportunities for persons with physical disabilities to enhance the quality of their lives through health, wellness, fitness, leisure, recreation and adaptive sports

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adaptive Recreation

Recreational and leisure experiences that develop interests and promote social involvement, including arts, crafts, horticulture, computers and wellness education.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Fitness opportunities offered for a variety of levels and impacts ranging from low to moderate designed to improve strength, stamina, flexibility and overall health to prevent relapse or further injury. Opportunities include a state-of-the-art fitness center with specialized and adaptive equipment, an indoor track, therapy pool and a variety of fitness classes, including seated aerobics, muscle energizer, yoga and totally fit.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

An active member of MoveUnited, adaptive sports offers sport activities for recreation and competition as well as sport clinics in the community. Sports include adaptive cycling, adaptive climbing, air rifle, boccia, goalball, power soccer and wheelchair sports such as softball, basketball and racing.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Assists persons who have a newly-acquired challenge and require assistance to participate in programming. An individualized program is developed to focuses on obtaining the skills needed to function independently at The Center. These may include mobility, personal hygiene, adaptive techniques, communication and/or cognition.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

A variety of support groups meet monthly at The Center to provide education and awareness of diverse challenges members, their families and the community confront on a routine basis. Opportunities are also offered to engage in community social and cultural events as well as recreational activities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Opportunities for youth with physical challenges to actively engage in recreational activities, adaptive sports, outings and cooperative games. Activities encourage relationship development, increased confidence and independence through successful experiences.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of members who maintain or improve their level of physical functioning

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of members who maintain or improve their level of social functioning

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of members who maintain or improve their level of life satisfaction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Although they represent approximately 20% of the U.S. population, individuals with disabilities often face a myriad of challenges not experienced by those without disabilities. For example, people with disabilities often experience poorer levels of health than the general population because of the many barriers they face when trying to improve their health (World Health Organization, CBR Guidelines). For many with physical disabilities, it can be particularly challenging to find the support of staff trained in adaptive fitness, as well as accessible facilities and equipment that meets their needs. Debilitating injuries or illnesses not only affect physical abilities, but in many cases may result in a significant reduction of income to the family, creating financial barriers. Further, misperceptions and stigma can result in additional barriers for those with disabilities, creating feelings of isolation, low self-esteem, and exclusion.

The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges (The Center) is guided by its mission: to provide opportunities for persons with physical disabilities to enhance the quality of their lives. Founded in 1957 by The Tulsa Section of The National Council of Jewish Women, The Center was created to provide organized social, cultural, and recreational opportunities for people with physical disabilities.
The only facility of its kind in eastern Oklahoma, The Center served 1,432 individuals last year. Offering an accessible facility, adaptive and assistive equipment, modest membership fees, and a knowledgeable and supportive staff, The Center strives to reduce barriers to participation for those with physical challenges, providing a warm and welcoming environment for members to work on their fitness and personal goals.
To fulfill its mission, The Center has identified key goals that will strengthen the organization, support exceptional programming for our members, and advance our mission in the community. These goals include:
• Assess and Enhance Membership and Programs;
• Advance and Maintain our Infrastructure;
• Increase Community Awareness by Clarifying and Sharing our Mission;
• Grow and Stabilize Diverse Funding;
• Invest in Board, Volunteers, and Staff.
Combined, we anticipate that achieving these goals will support a strong infrastructure, quality programming, diverse funding streams, and committed staff, volunteers, and board members.

Each of The Center's goals has corresponding strategies that have been identified to accomplish the goal. Highlights of those strategic initiatives include:

Goal # 1: Advance and Maintain our Infrastructure
Strategic Initiative 1: Provide oversight of the Capital Campaign
Strategic Initiative 2: Establish a committee to evaluate facility rental opportunities –
Strategic Initiative 3: Develop a master/security site plan
Strategic Initiative 4: Create a plan to hire a full-time Maintenance Manager

Goal # 2: Increase Community Awareness by Clarifying and Sharing our Mission
Strategic Initiative 1: Increase partnerships with groups/organizations -
Strategic Initiative 2: Leverage volunteers to build community initiatives
Strategic Initiative 3: Position ourselves to be a nationally recognized expert

Goal # 3: Assess and Enhance Membership and Programs
Strategic Initiative 1: Bring greater clarity and understanding to The Center's program areas
Strategic Initiative 2: Evaluate program and membership options to increase membership and participation
Strategic Initiative 3: Oversee the development of new member database
Strategic Initiative 4: Ensure quality of programming

Goal # 4: Grow and Stabilize Diverse Funding
Strategic Initiative 1: Personally cultivate and grow our current donor base
Strategic Initiative 2: Analyze our current fundraising events and explore new initiatives
Strategic Initiative 3: Research and garner new grant opportunities

Goal # 5: Invest in Board, Volunteers, and Staff
Strategic Initiative 1: Develop a strategy to greater utilize board connections and further board membership
Strategic Initiative 2: Cultivating and enriching volunteer involvement
Strategic Initiative 3: Create a growth and development plan for staff
Strategic Initiative 4: Role clarity for staff members

Nearly six decades ago, The Tulsa Section of The National Council of Jewish Women created The Center to provide organized social, cultural, and recreational opportunities for people with physical disabilities. Their dedication and vision provided the foundation for the organization's strength and capabilities. Building upon their vision, The Center continues to successfully fulfill its mission in the community, strategically endeavoring to enhance the quality of life for those living with physical disabilities.
The Center capably fulfills its mission with the support of a variety of resources including human resources, financial resources, and collaborations with other community partners. For example, , The Center's knowledgeable and dedicated staff members provide the knowledge and core capabilities needed to deliver quality programming for our members. The organization is led by Lori Long, CFRE, MHR, who has been The Center's Executive Director for 9 years. The Center's credentialed program staff are knowledgeable in adaptive activities, and proactively support members in meeting their personal and fitness goals. The Center's dedicated board members give generously of their time and resources, bringing a wealth of expertise to the organization, and directing the organization's strategic vision. Additionally, 854 volunteers provided a total of 17,044 volunteer hours last year to support The Center and its programming.
In addition to its human resources, The Center proactively secures funding from a variety of donors including private foundations, corporations and individuals. The Center also offers a variety of special events which provide additional revenue streams to support its programming and operations. Finally, membership fees offer additional support, providing approximately 5% of the Center's funding.
As the only organization of its kind in the area, The Center is a leader in its field. The Center proactively shares its expertise with others in the community, increasing awareness about those living with physical challenges. For example, The Center has been invited to participate in a focus group for a major new community park, with a goal of providing input and insight into the needs of those living with a variety of physical disabilities.
Further, The Center is a strong community collaborator. Highlights of a few of our collaborative partners include: U.S. Paralympics; Tulsa Community College-COTA program; University of Tulsa-Sport Science; University of Tulsa-Speech and Communication; University of Oklahoma Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy programs; Oklahoma State University Health Promotion; Indian Capital Technology Center-COTA program; Oklahoma State University Medical School; University of Oklahoma Professor PAWS program; TheraPETics; NuMotion; and Ability Resources. Through these relevant collaborations, The Center strengthens its programmatic reach and impact, providing new opportunities for members.

Serving the community for 59 years and the only facility of its kind in eastern Oklahoma, The Center is successfully fulfilling the vision of its founders. The Center seeks to enhance the quality of life for those individuals living with physical challenges, while reducing barriers to participation. To reduce physical barriers for those we serve, The Center's current facility was built around a concept called “Universal Design". This 35,000 square foot facility features creative solutions to everyday issues of accessibility and use. Physical disabilities may also result in financial challenges due to an inability to work and/or increased medical bills. One of our strategic initiatives was to evaluate program and membership options to increase membership and participation. As a result of that process, The Center recently restructured its membership fees. For only $20 per month for a base package, members can now access 85% of the Center's programming, including the fitness center. This restructuring not only helped reduce financial barriers, but has also provided opportunities for our members to explore new areas of interest. Many individuals living with physical disabilities may face less tangible barriers, including stigma and misperceptions about those living with physical challenges. The Center and its staff strive to offer a warm and welcoming environment where our members are valued for their abilities, rather than their challenges. As one young member of our Junior Wheelchair Sports Program noted, “When I am at school, I am either Kirstie in the wheelchair or Kirstie with the hot pink crutches. But when I am at The Center, I am just Kirstie. I am not defined by my disability or the equipment I use."
The Center also realizes the importance of program evaluation. This information is utilized to measure the progress and impact of our programming on the lives of those it serves. Data for participants is tracked through LIFEWARE, a community-based version of the tracking system used by hospitals and rehabilitation facilities to measure FIM (functional independence measure) scores. The Center's program evaluation data indicates that the organization is successfully enhancing the quality of life for those it serves, as measured by key indicators.

The Center is confidently poised for future growth through its Dream Big Capital Campaign. Designated a U.S. Paralympic Sport Club in 2011, we have seen interest in our adaptive sports programming grow. Through the development of an additional 28,000 square foot facility, as well as an outdoor expansion, this project will provide opportunities to expand our adaptive sports programming, as well as additional programming for children and youth with physical challenges. Groundbreaking for this new facility is scheduled for March of 2017.

Financials

THE CENTER FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH PHYSICAL CHALLENGES LTD
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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THE CENTER FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH PHYSICAL CHALLENGES LTD

Board of directors
as of 4/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dan Schmidt

D&L Oil Tools

Term: 2021 - 2020

Michael Krupka

T.D. Williamson

John Villareal

Catalan Recruiting, LLC

Kim Love

Titus Hillis Reynolds Love, PC

Joel Haaser

BKD LLP CPA's & Advisors

Ken Etheredge

Bank of Oklahoma

Scott Beller

Magellan Midstream

Jeff Brown

AEP/PSO

Barbara Bucholtz

University of Tulsa

Connor Cooper

Associated Mortgage Corporation

Ryan Darrow

Flight Safety International

Will Eagleton

Helmerich & Payne, IDC

Eric Ellsworth

Lauren Fisher

Williams

Weydan Flax

Retired Colonel - US Marine Corps

John Grey

McGraw Commercial Properties

Eric Hilaire

Tulsa Federal Credit Union

Robert Jared

Omni Air International

Waleska McQuarters

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma

Jack Montgomery

Community Volunteer

David Potts

Hall Estill

Stephanie Robason

KJRH - Channel 2

Lori Selby

Mazzio's

Trevor White

eXp Realty

Steve Yeagle

Donohue Commercial Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability