Blessed Sacrament and Incarnate Word Convent

Providing education,encouragement and support for children, youth and families

aka Blessed Sacrament Academy   |   San Antonio, TX   |  www.blessedsacramentacademysa.org

Mission

Since our founding in 1926 and our re-founding in 1989, by the Sisters of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament, our mission continues with compassion, respect and acceptance to educate and encourage children, youth and families. Our programs provide a safety net for those who reach out to us daily. Our purpose is to guide them to a life of success, self-efficiency and an attitude of giving back.

Notes from the nonprofit

Blessed Sacrament Academy is incorporating online learning for ages 6 weeks to 5 years, with in-house produced learning videos, age-specific learning and activity plans based on best national practices, and parenting education resources available to all parents of infants and toddlers. Visit the Child Development Center page at blessedsacramentacademysa.org to see our online early childhood education learning resources, new each week. This initiative complements and expands our classroom and outdoor learning spaces programs.

Ruling year info

1946

Principal Officer

Sr. Odilia Korenek

Main address

1135 Mission Rd

San Antonio, TX 78210 USA

Show more addresses

Formerly known as

Blessed Sacrament And Incarnate Word Convent

EIN

74-1369411

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a religious organization.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Blessed Sacrament Academy serves impoverished urban San Antonio families with early childhood and parenting education programs to help them succeed in school and in life. Our Child Development Center serves predominantly Hispanic (89%) children ages 6 weeks to 5 years in neighborhoods where more than 90% of children live in low-income homes. Poverty rates range from 19.1% to 35%+. Because they are born in poverty, these children are labeled from birth as at risk for failure. They are more likely to experience higher school dropout rates and higher rates of obesity and other diseases. Many parents are isolated and lack a quality support system. They need positive role models and guidance to break generational cycles of abuse and neglect. Due to trauma, many adults lack positive coping skills and need help building healthy resilience practices. We strive to take parents off the sidelines in their child's education, building a foundation many of them never had.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Child Development Center

The Child Development Center at Blessed Sacrament Academy provides affordable childcare combined with educational programs for children ages 6 weeks to 5 years in an exceptional setting. The CDC houses acclaimed Early Head Start programs and has achieved the highest 4-Star rating from Texas Rising Star for quality daycare programs. The CDC currently is awaiting national NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accreditation.
CDC offers age-appropriate development activities by professional childcare staff. The Foster Grandparent programs provides additional nurturing for the children and assistance for staff members. Outside Learning Spaces at the Child Development Center include a children's sensory learning garden, quality playground and a Dramatic Play center to maximize positive outdoors learning and health outcomes. Enrollment is open year-round.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Parents’ Academy exists to empower parents with positive parenting skills that reduce family stress and build family success. Many of the families served lack quality role models or a stable support system. Families participate in educational support group workshops that teach effective and respectful discipline techniques, helping parents on their journey to building a stronger family. Support services for the program include a family meal and childcare, removing obstacles to participation. As parents learn new skills and gain insights about leading their family with empathy and respect, children receive nurturing care in and enriching, safe environment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In 1995 Por Vida Academy Charter High School became one of the first charter school established in San Antonio. The school is hosted by the Sisters of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament in the high school building on the campus of Blessed Sacrament Academy. For more than 20 years, Por Vida has been helping thousands of students tackle whatever obstacles are in their path to earning a high school diploma. Por Vida Academy offers three types of diplomas for students seeking an alternative to public schools.

• Traditional diploma
• Credit recovery (with no age limit)
• GED classes (Por Vida is also an official GED Testing Center)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since our founding in 1926 and our re-founding in 1989, by the Sisters of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament, our mission continues with compassion, respect and acceptance to educate and encourage children, youth and families. Our programs provide a safety net for those who reach out to us daily. Our purpose is to guide them to a life of success, self-efficiency and an attitude of giving back.

Blessed Sacrament Academy serves struggling San Antonio families trapped in generational cycles of poverty or generational cycles of child abuse and neglect. The at-risk children we serve are more likely to fail academically and suffer poor health outcomes. Many are expected to earn disproportionately less as adults. The cost to society is high – from lost productivity and less taxes generated to costly diseases and social ills that strain taxpayer-funded health care, social programs and justice systems.

Our goals are to:
•End generational cycles of poverty by equipping children with the early tools and foundational learning skills they need to succeed in school and in life.
.Improve outcomes for the entire family by supporting parents through case management and coaching.
•End generational cycles of child abuse and neglect by equipping parents and children with specialized learning and stress reduction education designed to allow children to grow, learn and thrive in safe, nurturing homes.
•Provide urban families with safe, supervised outdoor learning spaces and sensory learning gardens to improve their health and encourage healthier behaviors.
.Develop a dual generation learning model where every member of the family can learn, grow and thrive.
.Equip parents with a greater understanding of the needs of their children, positive parenting techniques and a quality support system.
.Empower parents as advocates for their children and themselves.
.Strengthen family bonds through enrichment activities that help parents learn the importance of play.
.Connect parents with community resources for education and social services.
•Position Blessed Sacrament Academy as a model for how to comprehensively, cost-effectively address the myriad challenges of poverty, child abuse and neglect, and poor health.

On poverty
Challenges: National studies confirm that impoverished children at risk for academic failure and poor health outcomes are most in need of highest-quality early education intervention to lessen or eliminate those risks. Without access to highest-quality, affordable early childhood education, at-risk children are more likely to fail academically and to earn less as adults, creating generational cycles of poverty.

Strategies: Educational equity for at-risk children is achieved by high-quality intervention that begins as early as infancy, since 90% of a child’s brain development happens before age 5. While 94% of low-income Bexar County children lack access to Texas Rising Star-certified childcare, our Child Development Center has highest-quality (4-Star) Texas Rising Star certification. We enjoy 100% measurable improvements in early learning outcomes every year.

We are a national Early Head Start center, which significantly improves teacher training and education outcomes. In 2020, we are pursuing national NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) to measurably expand high-quality results.

On child abuse and neglect:
Challenges: Even though as many as nine in 10 child abuse and neglect cases go unreported, Bexar County confirmed 5,865 child abuse and neglect cases in 2018 alone. Nine of these San Antonio children suffered brutal deaths in a state that in 2018 reported 211 such deaths – the highest in six years. Yet, few programs offer help for parents at highest risk because of active cases with Child Protective Services (CPS) of Bexar County for suspected child abuse and neglect. Many of these parents were themselves physically abused or neglected as children –trapped in generational cycles of abuse and neglect.

Strategies: Of the low-income at-risk parents we serve at our parenting education program, many have active CPS cases, making them at highest risk. Yet, this program has enjoyed an 80% success rate for parents completing an intensive series of annual courses that take them from crisis to healing. The program equips parents with positive parenting skills. This success has led to the addition of Family Success Academy, which involves families learning together to recognize, avoid and prevent behaviors that can lead to abuse or neglect.

On health outcomes:
The challenge: Urban San Antonio families have less access to nearby, safe and supervised public parks and other affordable outside learning spaces. Many neighborhoods we serve are located in “food deserts,” where healthy, affordable foods are not readily available. Poor health can lead to obesity and other diseases.

Strategies: We provide free, healthy meals every day and safe, fenced, supervised outdoors play/learn spaces, which improves both health and learning outcomes (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Our Outdoor Learning Spaces component includes playgrounds, shaded learning and exercise sites, and sensory learning gardens.

Since 1926, Blessed Sacrament Academy has been a trusted community resource for San Antonio families in need, serving generations of families for more than nine decades.

Our Child Development Center, which opened in 1989, enjoys the highest 4-Star Texas Rising Star rating for quality early childhood education. The center is a national Early Head Start center, and currently is pursuing national NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accreditation. Every year, we report measurable improvements in age-appropriate earning and behavioral skills for every child from age 6 weeks to 5 years.

For impoverished working parents, quality childcare can exceed annual earnings (State of Texas, “Children at Risk:” 2018). We keep tuition fees low through external grants and other funding, and with daily support from extraordinary volunteers.

Because outside learning can measurably improve learning and health outcomes, the center recently added new outdoor learning spaces. We grow fruits and vegetables in four sensory gardens specially designed for infants and toddlers. National studies of outdoor learning programs for very young children report measurable improvements in learning and general health outcomes.

Parent education at Blessed Sacrament Academy targets at-risk and highest-risk parents to improve family outcomes. We do not restrict access to the program based on the ages of parents or their children. This program since 1994 has enjoyed an average 80% graduation rate for parents completing a series of eight-week courses. Family Success Academy will offer family-together, children-only and parents-only classes, workshops and events. Parents learn how to create safe, nurturing home environments for their children.

Blessed Sacrament Academy Executive Director Sister Odilia Korenek has been with BSA for 30+ years. Child Development Center Director Carol Silva has been the center’s director for 20+ years. Kathy Lozano, director of Family Success Academy has been with BSA for 30+ years.

We collaborate with the nonprofit Children’s Shelter and Texas Foster Care and Adoption Services, which refer families in crisis. We partner with Seton Home through the Pregnant and Parenting Counseling Program. We coordinate with Child Protective Services to identify clients who need parent education classes, and we coordinate referrals with Por Vida Academy for pregnant and parenting teens. We are partners with the San Antonio Food Bank, Texas Diaper Bank and Assistance League of San Antonio.

Community partners located on our grounds are Por Vida Academy high school; Jewish Family Services Counseling Center, and the Bexar County Probation Department Ropes Challenge teen mentoring program.

Because hungry children cannot learn, we provide fresh, healthy meals and snacks each day to children participating in our programs.

*The Child Development Center has consistently reported 100% measurable improvements in age-appropriate classroom learning since it opened in 1989.
*Parent education program has consistently maintained an 80% program completion rate achieved by 4,400 parents served since the program began in 1994.
•The Child Development Center earned the state’s highest 4-Star Texas Rising Star rating for quality early childhood education and is now seeking national NAEYC accreditation.
•Blessed Sacrament Academy added fall-safe surfacing to existing playground areas and purchased new equipment to improve benefits of safer outdoor play-and-learn activities.
*Blessed Sacrament Academy added landscaping, new outdoor learning spaces, outdoor rugs and canopies to expand outdoor activities to complement in-classroom teaching.
*The Child Development Center hired a part-time gardening instructor and created four outside sensory learning gardens to allow even the youngest children to improve sensory and other skills, while older toddlers also learn how healthy foods grow. Low-income parents who cannot afford expensive, fresh foods will learn how to grow healthy foods in pots or small urban garden spaces.
* To make transportation to our programs more affordable, our proactive membership in the Mission Road Collaborative led to San Antonio’s VIA bus service extending its lines to Blessed Sacrament Academy.
* Blessed Sacrament Academy became a member of the Ready Children Impact Council of United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County to share best practices with other early childhood education programs.
*Through our partnership as a World Heritage Buffer Zone for the City of San Antonio World Heritage Site (San Antonio’s missions), we are stakeholders in preserving the historic importance of a neighborhood that includes Blessed Sacrament Academy.

What’s next:

*Once NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accreditation is achieved, we will incorporate ongoing training and results tracking in every classroom. NAEYC-approved computer hardware and software for improved classroom teaching were in place by the end of 2019.
*We will expand our reach by continually seeking new funding to grow our Child Development Center and Family Success Academy to accommodate more children and families in need.

*We will develop long-term measurement tools to track children’s progress as they grow to adulthood. National research confirms a rate of return to communities of up to $17 for every dollar spent on quality early education for at-risk children
*To ultimately reduce long-term costs of utilities, we are seeking funding to begin installing environmentally friendly, energy-saving solar panels on building rooftops.
*Our 5-year strategic plan calls for creating a $5 million permanent endowment fund to ensure successful operations and program growth for coming decades.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To help gauge strategic planning for future years.,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We earned a grant to install fall-safe surfacing on all playground surfaces to keep children and safe and encourage more outdoor exercise and learning activities. We now have a thriving children's sensory learning garden that grows fresh vegetables for consumption, to encourage grow-at-home gardens and for learning activities, including healthy eating habits. When the global pandemic closed down early childhood education centers in Spring 2020, desperate parents were without food and infant supplies. We listened, and sought and obtained an emergency grant to provide toddler food, diapers, formula and other supplies. Parents suddenly found themselves teaching children at home. We listened, and now provide regularly updated online and mail-home education resources free to any family.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Blessed Sacrament and Incarnate Word Convent
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Blessed Sacrament and Incarnate Word Convent

Board of directors
as of 4/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sister Kathleen Goike

Sisters of the Incarnate Word Blessed Sacrament

Term: 2014 - 2017

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/28/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.