The 100 Club

Houston, TX   |  www.the100club.org

Mission

• To provide financial assistance to dependents of peace officers and firefighters who are killed or seriously injured in the line of duty • To provide law enforcement agencies with life-protecting equipment that cannot be secured through budgeted funds

Ruling year info

1965

Executive Director

Mr. William F. Skeen

Main address

6919 Portwest Dr Ste 150

Houston, TX 77024 USA

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Formerly known as

The Hundred Club of Greater Houston

EIN

74-1509204

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Survivor's Fun

Assist the dependents of peace officers and firefighters killed in the line of duty within our 32 county coverage area as well as the listed State of Texas law enforcement personnel killed anywhere in the state. A committee meets with the families to assess their needs and a recommendation is made to the Board of Directors for final approval. All assistance is based on the need of the family.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Law Enforcement agencies within our 18 county coverage area can apply for assistance for life saving equipment. The request is presented to a Committee for review and recommendation to the Board of Directors for final approval.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Club has an annual nomination process and presents law enforcement officrs and firefighters in honor of outstanding work in both law enforcement and firefighting in our 18 county coverage area.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau - Standards for Charity Accountability 2010

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2009

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The 100 Club is a 32,000-member non-profit organization that began in 1953, which provides financial support to the dependents of law enforcement officers and firefighters who are killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty in 32 counties surrounding Houston. On average, we distribute $320,000 per tragedy. The Club also provides life protecting equipment to law enforcement agencies in an 18 county region. Additionally, the Club provides financial support to Texas DP and Texas Parks & Wildlife Commission sworn personnel, and Texas Department of Criminal Justice Institutional personnel killed in the line of duty anywhere in the State of Texas.

The 100 Club's 32,000 individual members provide revenue through membership dues to fund the organization. Additionally, the Club's members provide support through donations when a law enforcement officer or firefighter is killed in the line of duty. 100% of those donations are placed in a Survivor's Fund is used to provide financial support to the dependents of those killed or seriously injured in the line of duty. The Club utilizes a direct mail program, social media, pro bono newspaper ads and billboards, Public Service Announcements (PSA's) and a public speaking program to market the organization.

The100 Club has a unique brand that has been in place since its beginning in Houston in 1953. The staff and Board of the organization are constantly working to increase the size of the organization through previously stated marketing initiatives. The Board is composed of working committees that meet to approve and recommend to the full Board the different aspects of the Club's program activities.

We have grown to a membership of 32,000 members since the Club began in 1953. Financial support to dependents has grown from a gift of $5,000 in the early days of the Club to an average gift of approximately $320,00 per tragedy all being based on the needs of the particular family. The size of the organization's geographic area has grown from only supporting the Houston Police Department in the early days to all law enforcement officers and firefighters in an 32 county region surrounding Houston and for support to certain State of Texas law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty any where in the State of Texas. The Club's operating budget has grown to an annual amount of over $4,000,000.

Financials

The 100 Club
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The 100 Club

Board of directors
as of 04/06/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jimmy R. Graves, Jr.

Willie Alexander

W.J. Alexander & Associates

John Braniff

Arthur J. Gallaher Risk Mgmt. Svcs.

Joseph Butera

Damian's Restaurant

Jerry Crews

EnergyQuest

Dick DeGuerin

DeGuerin & Dickson

George DeMontrond

DeMontrond Buick Co.

Cheryl Duff

N/A

Tyson Faust

Faust Distributing

James Graves

Graco Mechanical Inc.

Clarence Kendall

Attorney at Law

Richard Kuriger

RCK, Inc.

Bob Lawrence

Glass Wholesalers, Inc.

Robert Lyons

Ross Margraves

Winstead PC

Webb Melder

Melder Real Estate

John Montalbano

Montalbano Lumber Company

Kenneth Moore

Ken Moore Insurance Agency, Inc.

Todd Neal

Houston Chronicle

Thomas Pizzo

Retired

Randy Russell

Corporate Delivery Systems

C. Scherer

Attorney at Law C. Michael Scherer

David Shannon

WSH Land, Inc.

Barry Silverman

Barry Silverman L.L.C.

Tommy Thomas

Texas First Real Estate

Dana Tyson

Clear Channel Radio

John Van De Wiele

Van De Wiele Engineering, Inc.

Temple Webber

Temple Webber Photography

Don Woo

Mission Constructors, Inc.

Thomas Archer

Anne French

Ray Garcia

George Georgiades

Michael Harris

J.J. Ruffino

Anthony Silva

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/29/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.