Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

Samaritan Center

The Path to Wellness

aka Samaritan Center

Austin, TX

Mission

Mission We heal hearts, provide hope and enhance lives with a holistic approach to mental health for all ages, whole families and the military community. Our holistic approach to care includes four pillars of health: mind, body, spirit and community. We provide professional counseling that is spiritually integrated, honoring every individual’s belief and faith systems. Our integrative medicine offerings support the physical symptoms that often accompany emotional stress and mental illness. Vision We envision a healthy and compassionate community in which every individual achieves mental, physical, spiritual and social well-being.

Ruling Year

1974

Principal Officer

Mrs. Cindy Long

Main Address

8956 Research Blvd. Bldg. 2

Austin, TX 78758 USA

Keywords

mental health counseling, spirituality, youth, family, counseling, education, workshops,

EIN

74-1832864

 Number

0726841961

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Family Counseling, Marriage Counseling (P46)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

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Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The Samaritan Center has been serving individuals and families in Central Texas for more than 45 years. We envision a healthy and compassionate community where every individual achieves mental, physical, spiritual and social well-being. We heal hearts, provide hope, and enhance lives with a holistic approach to mental health for all ages, whole families and the military community. The Samaritan Center also partners with the Military Veteran Peer Network (MVPN) to provide additional support for our veterans and their families.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

3

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Services We Provide

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hours of no-cost treatment provided

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Veterans

Related program

Services We Provide

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

6,029 hours of treatment provided to 448 veterans, 36 Service Members, 116 spouses and 70 children provided at no cost.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Services We Provide

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

12,735 hours of counseling & integrative medicine treatment provided to 1,394 individuals.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The Center’s primary goal is to improve the mental, physical, and spiritual health of children, adults and families in Texas. We provide mental health care, integrative medicine, and wellness education that is accessible and affordable for all, especially vulnerable populations such as uninsured or underinsured low income families and veterans struggling with the emotional wounds of war. The Center offers a broad spectrum of mental health outreach, prevention and treatment programs. Integrative medicine (acupuncture, biofeedback, herbs, pilates, yoga & massage) is used as an adjunct to traditional counseling to treat the physical symptoms of mental health problems that are difficult to treat by talk therapy alone. We also coordinate the Travis County chapter of the statewide Texas Military Veteran Peer Network (MVPN), a mental health outreach and suicide prevention network of Volunteer Coordinators, Field Clinicians, and Peer Counselors helping veterans statewide adjust to life with PTSD and brain injuries. We have an extreme shortage of low-cost mental health resources in Central Texas for the uninsured. Even with the Affordable Care Act, a significant number of people with incomes under 100% of the federal poverty level, along with undocumented individuals will have no options for insurance. There will be others who qualify for government subsidies, but will not be able to afford their deductibles and copays. The Samaritan Center is one of the only options where children, adults and families can receive treatment for an unlimited number of sessions, regardless of the ability to pay. Adding to our overburdened mental health system are shocking suicide rates for Texas veterans, estimated to be 22 per day. As 1,500 reservists and 23,000 active duty service members return to Central Texas from deployment, it is estimated that 40% require treatment for PTSD, TBI (traumatic brain injury) and substance abuse. Yet, nearly 50% receive no treatment at all. The costs of untreated mental health problems to our community are enormous. Texans lose $16.6 billion each year in lost wages, lost jobs, medical costs and personal debt related to depression alone. In addition to economic costs, individuals and families suffer needlessly. Our nation searches for answers to community tragedies and senseless deaths when time and time again untreated mental health problems surface as a primary contributing factor. Increasing access to affordable treatment we can save lives, save families, and save money. Research indicates mental health treatment more than pays for itself and can help prevent and reduce violence, substance abuse, child abuse, suicide, crime, and divorce. Long term results show a reduction in costly community problems such as hospitalization, incarceration, poverty and homelessness.

Mental health needs are complex requiring a combination of services and programs for optimum client outcomes. We are founded on a holistic – body, mind, soul and community – approach to treatment. Our counselors are trained to address spiritual issues in the treatment process at a client’s request. Integrative Medicine treats physical symptoms of mental health problems that cannot be treated with talk therapy alone. Community education and peer-led support groups are provided as prevention and early intervention services. Expanding services to offer psychiatric care will complete our broad array of healthcare options. A primary strategy for accomplishing our long-term goals is to proactively prepare the Center for a changing model of healthcare delivery. By embracing both, an integrative (acupuncture, biofeedback) and integrated (medical model) of care along with implementing key competencies, we will ensure the Center is well-positioned to transition seamlessly and thrive in a new healthcare environment. These key competencies include: • Offer a full array of specialty behavioral health services for prevention, intervention and recovery • Utilize a well-defined assessment and treatment process • Increase collaboration with primary care physicians and psychiatrists • Utilize a multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate care • Demonstrate use of best-practice clinical guidelines • Use a research-based outcome measurement system • Implement electronic scheduling, medical records, and billing software • Ensure use of an on-going quality improvement process • Strengthen financial systems to improve billing and accounts receivable process The Center has a well-defined assessment and treatment process that adheres to the stringent accreditation standards and holistic philosophy of the Solihten Institute. This is validated by a quality improvement process and ongoing accreditation reviews to ensure the use of best practice clinical guidelines. Clinical and psychiatric case consultation occur regularly to ensure therapists are utilizing the latest evidence-based therapies and we make every effort to consult and coordinate care with a client’s primary care physician/psychiatrist throughout the therapeutic process. These practices are embedded in our treatment philosophy, policies, and procedures. In partnership with Humana, the Center uses a research-based outcome management program developed by ACORN called Outcome Informed Care. Client progress is measured before each session and used to influence “real-time” treatment decisions as opposed to evaluation after treatment. Outcome Informed Care is proven to increase client retention, increase the client-therapist alliance, and dramatically impact client improvement. We can now prove the Samaritan Center’s treatment programs are highly effective and a great value for the money invested.

The Samaritan Center for Counseling and Pastoral Care, Inc. (Samaritan Center) has been providing services in Central Texas for 45 years, always taking a holistic approach to care and striving to make high-quality professional mental health treatment affordable and accessible for all. In 2007 we created the Hope for Heroes program to address the unique needs of military veterans and their family members. In 2011 we started providing integrative medicine services including acupuncture, nutrition and herbal medicine, herbal medicine and nutrition consults, instruction in corrective exercise, yoga, pilates, acupressure and self-massage, meditation/mindfulness, and breathwork. We are accredited by the Solihten Institute in Denver, Colorado and part of a network of centers across the nation that are committed to providing holistic mental health services. Each center is led by its own local Board of Trustees as a nonprofit organization. As one of the largest providers of mental health services in the nation, the work of Solihten Counseling Centers has been acknowledged by the American Medical Association, the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, the President’s Commission on Mental Health, and major religious denominations. The Samaritan Ministry, now the Solihten Institute, was founded in 1972 when a physician, a pastor, and a psychologist observed that by working together, ministers, therapists, and physicians were more effective in helping people heal and reach their potential. This team approach became the foundation of the Samaritan program. Samaritan counselors believe that there is a close relationship of mind, body, spirit, and community, and that optimal health care involves consideration of all four.

Key Indicators of organizational success include: • Increased treatment efficacy • High staff morale and stability • Positive 3rd party organizational assessments • Annual audits with no findings • Increased board member recruitment and retention Our outcome management system, ACORN (A Collaborative Outcome Research Network) uses data to change the course of care in real time. Surveys are administered before each treatment session. The therapist and client discuss the survey responses and make adjustments to treatment as necessary. Survey data is analyzed using national benchmarks for the rate of client change and used to guide case consultation. Therapists with clients indicating progress is slower than average receive individual clinical guidance. Key indicators of success are the rate of client change and improvement. Annual targets are: • 75% clients will report improvement—15% higher than the national average • A rate of client change that is 20% higher than the national average • Achieving the same outcomes in 8 visits that other counselors achieve in 10. • 10% improvement in client retention Key indicators of increased program reach include client visits and individuals served. Interim targets include: • Annual 10% increase in number of clients • Annual 10% increase number of client visits Annual reports on number of individuals served, and treatment sessions provided are used to project client demand, guide funding requests and determine staffing needs. Demographic reports are used to guide satellite office placement to ensure our services are accessible throughout our service area. The board monitors organizational success by internal reports, external reports and direct inspections according to an annual agenda. Monthly reports monitor indicators such as organizational impacts, financial conditions, budgeting, staff treatment, consumer treatment, asset protection, compensation, external audits, CEO effectiveness and board function. Targets include: • Board motions approving monitoring reports • Annual clean audit • Successful CEO and Board evaluations The Solihten Institute Accreditation process uses best-practice standards that are considered essential for optimum center clinical practice and administration efficiency. Grant monitoring reports and program audits indicate successful grant implementation. Targets include: • Monthly, quarterly and semi-annual grant reports indicating target outputs and outcomes are met • Successful program audits Staff and board surveys, external organizational assessments such as the Core Capacity Assessment Tool (CCAT) are used to signal progress and success.

Samaritan Center established the Hope for Heroes program and has been serving veterans, active duty military, their spouse, and children for free. This program offers counseling and integrative medicine services. Samaritan Center also created the Military Veteran Peer Network in Texas and now operates the Travis County outreach program. This program engages justice related vets who are isolated and struggling with reintegration problems. Samaritan Center hopes to grow these programs as the need continues to increase exponentially for mental health care for our military population. Individual counseling programs continue to thrive, yet the need for affordable appointments is also increasing. Samaritan Center is working to increase sustainable private donations and move away from a dependence on grants so that they can provide sliding scale and free care.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, suggestion box/email.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: our staff, our funders.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.

External Reviews

Accreditations

Solihten Institute 2019

Awards

Heroes in the Fight Award 2008

Mental Health America

Finalist Community Service 2009

Austin Chamber of Commerce

Nonprofit Excellence Finalist - Collaboration 2009

Greenlights for Nonprofit Success

Impact Austin 2014

Impact Austin

Financials

Samaritan Center

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/01/2020

Leadership

No data

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data