Christian Assistance Ministry, Inc.

How will you share you harvest?

aka CAM   |   San Antonio, TX   |  www.cam-sa.org

Mission

CAM's mission is to share the love of Christ by providing immediate assistance and encouragement to people in crisis.

Notes from the nonprofit

When you harvest the crops on your land, do not cut all the way to the corners of your field. Don't pick up the grain that falls on the ground. Leave it for the poor..." Leviticus 23:22. Our wheat logo refers to this scripture and the idea that that we all have a harvest to share. It refers to leaving what is left over but also planning for a portion of our Harvest to go to those in need. At the time this scripture was written a farmer who had obeyed God's command would have had a visible wheat field with tall uncut corners. That visual would have told a weary traveler or someone in need that this farmer was obeying God's command and that in turn God had answered their prayers. CAM hopes to be that tall corner of hope for our community!

Ruling year info

1978

President/CEO

Mrs. Dawn Charise White-Fosdick

Main address

110 McCullough

San Antonio, TX 78215 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-1947967

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CAM addresses issues of poverty and low income or working poor clients by providing immediate assistance with no demographic requirements. Often working poor individuals, those in poverty and or even homeless don't know where to turn for help or can't wait for an appointment or long waiting lists. Our goal is to be an "emergency room of social services" by providing the immediate help with few barriers and then connect clients to "specialists"-local non profits that can resolve long term issues.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Client Services

CAM calls itself an Emergency Room of Social services providing for important basic needs and then connecting clients to specialists at other nonprofits in community. Through an interview process, CAM is able to assess client need and then specifically provide food, clothing, and household items, qualified financial aid (utilities, ID Recovery, prescription assistance) guidance about community resources, a free mailbox, and transportation. CAM serves low income working poor and homeless. In addition CAM has become an expert on the unsheltered street homeless over the past 3 years. CAM has developed innovative programming to serve the most difficult homeless clients and is getting over 30 people off the streets each month. Part of this work is providing an array of services every day of the week to build a relationship with these clients including showers, daily food, porta potties, hair cuts, and help to sign them up for access to a variety of housing and shelter options.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Christian Assistance Ministry distributes over $250,000 to clients for utilities, identification recovery, prescription drugs, transportation, and other miscellaneous needs. CAM's flexibility allows this service to meet the needs of clients in real time with immediacy and urgency. Many clients are referred to CAM from other agencies, schools and hospitals. Because CAM is not a government program we can meet unusual needs to include helping with a funeral expense, work boots for a new job, tools for a job or a moving expense for a 95 year old veteran being evicted. Our process creates safeguards including validation of the need (i.e. proof of new job, eviction notice, disconnect notice, prescription, or referral from another agency). CAM only writes checks directly to the business the client needs to pay and only paid full time staff with CAM actually write and approve checks. All have a financial hardship and are low income with most facing serious financial hardship.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CAM provides food and clothing to individuals and familys annually. Clients may receive groceries and clothing items on a quarterly basis and homeless clients may receive sack lunches weekly. CAM serves around 50,000 individuals annually with food or clothing assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 2017

United Way Member Agency 2018

United Way member agency 2019

United Way member agency 2020

United Way member agency 2021

United Way member agency 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Food and Clothing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CAM provides groceries to anyone across the city once every two months. Then we help the client access a more convenient resource near their place of residence; we provide 75 sack lunches daily.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

25% of clients served are homeless. They range in need from folks who are staying with people, to people working, others in programs and finally the severely mentally and physically ill.

Number of clients who have access to transportation to job site

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people

Related Program

Cash-in-Aid Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

On average CAM is able to help approximately 200 clients with specific monthly bus transportation to work. We have upgraded our ability to do this and increased our annual budget to help more

Number of people reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CAM provides an opportunity, not a requirement, for clients to be prayed with,to leave a prayer request and receive a call back with prayer, free Bibles and a morning Bible Study.

Number of individuals helped with financial assistance for prescriptions, ID recovery and or Utilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Cash-in-Aid Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CAM serves individuals in San Antonio and Bexar County through help with immediate safety net needs. Areas that CAM addresses include utility assistance, food, prescriptions, transportation, clothing, access to communication (i.e. postal service), ID recovery and information and referral. Many local nonprofits utilize CAM as a means to help their clients with items the government will not support so that the client can avail themselves to a program that organization provides. This is a vital service in San Antonio and is often the first step along the social service continuum. One might say that CAM acts as an emergency room of social service by meeting the most immediate stabilizing needs for folks with one time emergencies or long term systemic issues and then connects the client to long term or specialized help in the community. CAM has no demographic requirements and makes access a primary resource of our service. The access, immediacy and link to other community resources is a hallmark of the help CAM provides. Our goals are often to be bridge for gaps in service, help in avoiding further crisis and helping those who often have no other place to turn. CAM does this work with the higher purpose of showing God's grace to those in need. We believe that we are called to serve and our mission is as much about providing hope as it is help. Our mission is to share the love of Christ by providing immediate help and encouragement to people in crisis. Although we serve anyone in need regardless of faith, our services include the message of Christs love and our volunteers and staff serve with Grace.

CAM's first strategy is to serve all demographics making it easy for those in need to walk in our door and begin working on their issues. CAM serves a large and varied client base with an average of 150-200 clients per day. CAM serves populations including the elderly, children, single moms, people who have experienced a life crisis (i.e. job loss, illness, etc) working poor families, ex-offenders, disabled individuals, veterans, homeless individuals and individuals on some form of government assistance or living at or below the poverty-level. The CAM strategy involves making access to anyone simple and easy while strategically working on immediate needs. This always begins with an interview process before we provide resources so that we can help the client problem solve and ensure that what we are providing today includes referrals and resources for the future. This not only means that people may avoid further crisis but that they are calmed and stabilized so that they can begin processing plans to resolve long term issues. The services provided by CAM look to be the first step out of crisis by providing emergency assistance, stabilization and then referral to a community program that can help with long term needs. CAM strategies focus on ease of service, access to all, and involve leveraging dollars with donated food, clothing, volunteers and buildings that we offer the service. This strategy means that we can serve more with less; that we can immediately serve and that we can serve with joy and grace through volunteers who are here because they love helping. CAM does this with no government support and a network of donors that include churches, corporations, foundations and individuals.

CAM has been operating this very defined "emergency room of social services" ministry since 1977. We have fine tuned our service delivery and have a strategic set of processes that serve our clients and leverage resources. CAM is a United Way affiliate which means we are overseen by an outside source that explores our board and business capabilities before providing us any funding. We are overseen by a Board of Directors, an outside auditor annually and by a membership council made up of churches that support CAM. CAM partners with other nonprofits in the area as well as local churches. There are 8 full-time staff members, 3 part-time staff members, and a large volunteer force (over 200 that work weekly and close to 1000 who provide supports throughout the year). CAM has developed a means for operating that includes a volunteer force, donated buildings, reserves to help with cash flow and diversified funding that includes churches, individuals, one annual fundraising dinner and corporate and United Way grant funding. We are supported by 74 member churches. CAM also receives in-kind donations from churches, businesses and individuals. CAM is always looking to increase our operating budget by applying for various grants and by cultivating individual donor support.

Progress for CAM comes in the form of progress for our agency (efficiency in operation, technology, fund and resource raising) and those we serve (how many and how we serve). CAM has developed an incredible team of volunteers (long term volunteers with incredible skill sets) and a system for utilizing donated items in order to maximize our ability to link these donated items to service for those in need. In addition, over the years CAM has increased its ability to serve individuals including total numbers served and the types of service and how many times we offer the service. CAM has progressed in its services from serving 30,000 annually to over 50,000 annually today. The clients served are duplicated (however that duplication is at a minimum as the services are 1 time annually for financial and 6 times annually for food/clothing). As important as the numbers served the quality of service from leveraging dollars through the Bexar County CEAP (utility assistance program) with CAM dollars (only started 7 years ago), to improved volunteer training, incorporating client data basing with Haven for Hope's HMIS system and the development of work instructions for each area, along with a volunteer handbook have meant that our services not only meet the highest need for help in the community but are delivered in a fair and high quality way. Progress for CAM has meant that we have continued to improve our services as well as improve our ability to manage funds, increase donations both in resources and in financial support without government support. CAM has also become a United Way agency and meets all requirements of their audit requirements. Progress for CAM and those we serve means that we have the most urgent items needed for those in crisis and we have an ability to maintain our budget and resources in order to deliver the service and mission we have outlined. We continue to diversify funding and links to other community agencies in order to leverage and maximize our services. What's next!? CAM celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2017 and unveiled a 10 year strategic vision that looked to maintain our mission while growing our ability to serve more. This begins with raising awareness by utilizing our strategically located downtown location as a means to promote the mission while increasing volunteers and donors to serve more. Once this effort is accomplished we will begin serving more clients and serving those we currently help with more resources, next we believe we can expand our reach by utilizing this model of donated spaced, volunteers and churches to provide service to clients throughout the City. Finally, we want to be strategically replicable by creating sort of a CAM in a box that provides training and resources to other communities and churches so that they can create a CAM where we can not serve. We want the ministry of CAM to be an incredible testimony as to the power of obeying God's Command to Share our Harvest!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    working poor, vulnerable mentally ill/physically ill, all ages, families, individuals with homes or without homes.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, call them to interview them,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    CAM moved the food distribution for our homeless outside based on a client suggestion. CAM created a special weekly time for clients to access individual case management even when a client is lacking adequate Identification; so that we can improve that and get the client moving towards getting to be able to access all levels of service.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    CAM has realized that our unsheltered homeless are not choosing housing or shelter because they have so many barriers to accessing service. It's not really a choice. We developed an outdoor and on the street homeless outreach program to better serve those that won't seek traditional help. This has resulted in almost 30 clients getting off the streets per month. It has been a game changer.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Christian Assistance Ministry, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Christian Assistance Ministry, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Marlise Kercheville

Lisa Allen

Steves Doors

Molly Amini

Eileen Cochran

Office Manager

Chris Corso

Joeris Marketing

David Held

Real Estate

Marlise kercheville

attorney

Leslie Morrison

Artist

Kirstin Silberschlag

Attorney

Judy Zimmerman

RVK Architects

Allison DeGerolami

wells Fargo

Michele Camp

Chase Bank

Andrew Barton

Arbitration

Brian Biggs

Nustar Energy

April Gates

Community volunteer

David Held

Endura

Susan kerr

Community Volunteer

Grace Labatt

Community Volunteer

Heather Lopez

HR Iheartradio

Albert McNeel II

Endura

Roman Medina Jr

Jefferson Bank

Jacqueline Roberts

Plastic Company owner

David Schwab

Zachry Group Attorney

Charles Stockton

SR VP Frost Bank

David Youngquist

Contractor/Owner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/5/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.