Children's Association for Maximum Potential, Inc.

Strengthening and inspiring individuals with special needs.

aka CAMP   |   San Antonio, TX   |  http://www.campcamp.org

Mission

The mission of Children's Association for Maximum Potential (CAMP) is to strengthen and inspire individuals with special needs - and those who care for them - through Recreation, Respite, and Education.

Ruling year info

1980

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Susan Osborne

Main address

PO Box 27086

San Antonio, TX 78227 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2095766

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Imagine your child is non-verbal and has such extreme medical needs that every basic need: eating, bathing, and physical movement has to be facilitated by you 24/7. Picture scraping every dollar you have to pay for therapies, orthotics, & medications that give your child a better quality of life. For most of our CAMP families this is a reality.

Too often individuals with special needs, or who are considered medically fragile, have never had “typical" childhood experiences like swinging, sliding, friends to play with, or the joy of being unconditionally accepted. Attending weekend outings is challenging, and attending summer camp is not thought of as an option. Caregivers experience higher depression rates, higher rates of divorce, have higher rates of mental and physical health issues, and finances are constantly a struggle. For these reasons, CAMP has dedicated nearly 40 years to this special population to ensure opportunities for recreation, respite and education are available!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Association for Maximum Potential

Children's Association for Maximum Potential programs include residential summer camping, respite programs, health equipment loan program, and training for care providers. Through these resources more than 1,000 individuals with special needs are served on an annual basis.

Population(s) Served

Summer Camp offers nine distinct one-week sessions of residential camp in the summer from May through August. Campers range in age from 5 to 50 years, and non-disabled siblings aged 5 to 13 years may attend camp as well. During every week of camp, there are doctors and nurses available. Activities are available to campers due to adaptations that ensure activities are truly accessible. Because many of our campers with a pediatric diagnosis are living longer and would typically age out of our programs, two of the nine summer sessions are for adults. Adult sessions serve individuals aged 22 to 50 years and offer the same activities, medical care, and counselor support as our traditional camping sessions. The length of Summer Camp affords families of campers the respite they continue to need and deserve while participants achieve their own goals (established by families).

Population(s) Served

PNO provides respite care for children aged 6 months to 13 years one Friday evening per month in our facility at Lackland AFB in San Antonio, Texas. Children with special needs and their typical siblings are eligible to attend and every child with a special need is provided 1:1 support through trained volunteers. PNO affords families who have one or more children, including foster child placements, the ability to receive full childcare for 4 hours. A Nurse is present throughout the event, not only in case of minor bumps or scrapes, but to safely administer medications and monitor children who require additional medical care. Activities are designed to meet age-appropriate, developmental goals, then modified to include everyone regardless of ability.

Population(s) Served

TADA programming offers monthly socialization opportunities for individuals with special needs, starting at age 14 years. Events are community-based and typically occur on Saturdays at various venues throughout the San Antonio area, starting in September and continuing through May. On scheduled weekends throughout the school year, an average of 20 or more participants meet at pre-selected locations around the city where they are paired one-to-one with volunteers who are uniquely trained in caring for those who are medically, physically, developmentally, and/or intellectually challenged, for an afternoon or evening of fun and entertainment. Destinations include sporting events, amusement parks, area malls, movies, museums, and other places frequented by teens and young to middle-aged adults. CAMP charges a nominal fee to participants and covers all fees for volunteers. CAMP seeks donated tickets or event sponsors to ensure that the cost of an event is not a barrier to participation.

Population(s) Served

Respite Weekends are designed much like our summer programs with participants enjoying the same type of activities. This monthly program begins on a Saturday morning and concludes late Sunday afternoon. It allows a short respite for caregivers and fosters year-long relationships among campers.

Population(s) Served

Family Retreats are designed for individuals with special needs and their families to participate in traditional camping activities together. During the retreat, all meals are prepared by a cook, allowing families the time to retreat and relax together. Family “buddies” are available to guide each family through the weekend and help facilitate chosen activities.

Population(s) Served

Leader In Training (LIT) is a summer program designed for individuals who will be 14-years-old during their LIT session. Designed to help prepare for potential future Volunteer or Staff roles, the program emphasizes learning a variety of camp-specific and leadership skills (not 1:1 with a Camper), to include creating successful peer relationships, working with individuals of a variety of ages and needs, and actively participating in various job responsibilities at Camp CAMP.

Population(s) Served

Throughout the year, health care professionals earn hands-on continuing education hours (CME, CNE, CEU) through the Developmental Disability Reality Course (DDRC). Health care professionals assist in medication administration and meeting the general healthcare needs of Campers. CAMP partners with physicians, RNs, pharmacists, respiratory therapists, and other health and allied health professionals (as well as with students/trainees in these disciplines) to make programs possible.

Population(s) Served

Teen volunteers serve as buddies to the Campers; supervising and assisting individuals with medical, physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation 2007

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation 2013

Awards

Volunteer Program of the Year 2011

United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County

Elanor Eells Award for Program Excellence 2012

American Camp Association

Affiliations & memberships

American Camp Association - Member 1992

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Campers garner independence, self-confidence, and encouragement through fun recreational activities and social interactions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Summer Camp

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Year-Round, 98% of participants and families graded CAMP with an "A"!

Parents and siblings will receive a break from routine around the clock care of their family member with a disability.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Summer Camp

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

87% stated that they “strongly agree” that a CAMP week like this past summer was helpful to them and their family’s well-being; 12% said they “agree”; 1% said they “disagree” or “strongly disagree.”

Childcare for families that offer recreational group age-appropriate activities and developmental enrichment for participants.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% felt PNO provided a safe, supportive environment that allowed them to have a worry-free evening. 83% felt events relieved stress and helped them cope with their caregiving responsibilities.

Recreational and social interactions that offer participants community based outings that facilitates experiences and opportunities afforded to people without disabilities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

80% felt events relieved stress and helped them cope with their caregiving responsibilities; provided a break that allowed them to experience/accomplish something more easily or that was not possible

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 1979, Children's Association for Maximum Potential (CAMP) has provided recreational programming for individuals, aged 5 - 50, with developmental, intellectual, medical, behavioral, and physical disabilities. Many of the individuals who attend CAMP do not have the option to go to other camps, including "special needs camps", due to the severity of their disability or medical condition. We believe that “CAMP is for the camper" and our goal is to help every camper reach their maximum potential and know what it means to live life without being defined by a disability.

Our goals fall into three primary categories:
1. Recreation opportunities year-round for over individuals with special needs.
2. Respite opportunities year-round for families and caregivers.
3. Education opportunities for the community in the form of volunteer opportunities for high-school and adults, hands-on continuing education opportunities for healthcare professionals, and partnerships with other non-profits in the area to serve the community at large.

As a result of the year-round and summer programs, campers garner independence, self-confidence, and encouragement through fun recreational activities and social interactions, while parents and siblings receive a break from routine around-the-clock care of their family member. The success of each program is based on adapted activities that allow participants to experience a sense of mobility and independence.

To strengthen and inspire campers while offering much needed respite for their families, CAMP's primary program strategies are broken into two categories: Summer Programs and School-Year Programs. Year-round, CAMP programs alleviate medical, physical, developmental, social, and intellectual barriers for campers by adapting all of its activities to allow full participation. As a result of the year-round and summer programs, campers garner independence, self-confidence, and encouragement through medically safe recreational activities and social interactions, while parents and siblings receive a break from routine around-the-clock care of their family member.

Summer programs consist of nine distinct one-week residential sessions at our 55-acre, 400+ bed capacity camp in the Texas Hill Country. Here, individuals participate in traditional camping activities such as swimming, horseback riding, canoeing, archery, outdoor cooking, paintball, music recreation, nature discovery, arts & crafts, karaoke, and so much more.

School-year programs consist of nine monthly weekend camps (Respite Weekends, held at Camp CAMP) designed much like the summer camp program, nine monthly evening events (Parent’s Night Out, held at our offices on Lackland AFB) that offer fun and safe enrichment activities for children with special needs, and their siblings, while their parents receive respite from child care responsibilities, nine monthly teen and adult outings (Teen and Adult Day Adventure, held throughout the Greater San Antonio area) that offer individuals with special needs the ability to socialize and enjoy age appropriate recreation at sporting events, amusement parks, museums, and festivals, and lastly, unique family retreats (Family Weekends held at Camp CAMP) for 12-14 families on the same weekend, each with a family member who has special needs.

All programs are designed for our campers to participate in group activities and can easily be adapted to meet the needs of each camper. Through a 1:1 camper to counselor ratio, CAMP maximizes opportunities for success. Because each camper comes to CAMP with different goals in mind, we strive to individualize camper experiences so campers can successfully achieve their goals.

CAMP employs 21 permanent staff and approximately 70 summer staff to assist with operations and programming. It’s important to note the longevity of our permanent staff, with an average number of years of service just over ten years, and 40% of the team having served longer than ten years. CAMP’s leadership team has spent more than eleven years overseeing CAMP’s programs and administration, and collectively the permanent staff have over 100 years of experience in the field.

CAMP’s 2019 Board of Directors consisted of 16 active members who meet six times annually in the months of January, March, May, July, September, and November. The Board actively assists with annual fundraising, social media initiatives, participation in major donor site visits, recruitment of new board members, relationship cultivation, advocacy, awareness, and governance.

During the 2019 program year, 1,515 volunteers dedicated 86,870 hours of service, while 208 Health Care volunteers gave 16,856 hours of service and earned 743 continuing education hours. Given that the majority of our volunteers are young, turnover is inevitable as this group graduates from high school or college. However, we average a summer retention rate of approximately of 37.7% annually. Volunteers at CAMP are students, teachers, business owners, community leaders, doctors, nurses, and other professionals. While the majority of our volunteers are individuals, we frequently have groups volunteer from local businesses, community organizations, schools, churches, as well as universities and colleges (both local and nationally).

Collaborations are central to CAMP’s mission and ensure we can provide the intense medical care, including 24-hour medical supervision, our medically fragile campers require in order to participate. Health care collaborations include Resident and/or Fellow Programs from University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, UT Austin, Joint Base San Antonio (Lackland, Ft. Sam Houston), Madigan Army Base, and Wright Patterson Air Force Base; nursing student programs from Baptist Health Systems, University Health Systems, Hallmark University, South University (Austin), Texas A&M (Corpus Christi),; Respiratory Therapist programs from UT Health Science Center and St. Phillips College; and Pharmacy Students from University of Houston, University of Texas Austin, and A&M Kingsville. CAMP also works in unison with several referral sources within the San Antonio special needs community, including but not limited to Autism Lifeline Links, The Arc of San Antonio, Respite Care of San Antonio, Any Baby Can, TEAMability, Kinetic Kids San Antonio, and Alamo Area Council of Governments (AACOG).

Children's Association for Maximum Potential (CAMP) began in 1979 when a group of US Air Force pediatricians, Dr. Chris Plauche Johnson, Dr. Fred McCurdy, and Dr. Robert de Lemos, along with other health professionals brought 32 children with special needs together for a weekend camp. These campers were not accepted to other camps – even those for children with special needs – due to the severity of their medical conditions or disabilities. CAMP incorporated in 1980 and held camps at rented facilities during its first ten years. In 1989 CAMP purchased an old church camp facility and began retrofitting and adapting it to meet the needs of its campers. Today, CAMP's main purpose remains to help campers reach their maximum potential, and has grown to serving well over 1,000 individuals with special needs every year.

What makes CAMP unique is our ability to serve individuals with special needs who are not eligible to apply, or be accepted by, other camps. Our 1:1 camper to counselor ratio and volunteer medical staff are key to providing a safe and fun-filled experience for individuals with special needs. CAMP is the only organization providing recreational opportunities of this scale to this very special and fragile population in Texas.

CAMP's sustainability and success is due to its culture that emphasizes experienced and committed staff, recruiting energized and generous board members, training extraordinary teen and young adult volunteers, and collaboration within the medical profession to provide first class volunteer medical staff. At CAMP, we strive to be one of the best nonprofit agencies in our industry, earning the confidence and financial support extended by the philanthropic community.

CAMP's vision for the next five years is to enhance and expand programs, improve facilities, capitalize on talent to meet organizational needs, and improve a marketing strategy to engage donors and alumni. We look forward to strengthening and inspiring even more individuals in the future!

Financials

Children's Association for Maximum Potential, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Children's Association for Maximum Potential, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/1/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Ken McConnell

Seguin RV

Term: 2017 - 2020


Board co-chair

Ms. Bernadette McKay

Deputy City Attorney (Retired)

Term: 2017 - 2023

Julie Allen

Community Advocate

Dana Fox

Attorney at Law

Marilyn Harrington

Community Advocate

Lee Matecko

Whole Foods

Alycia Maurer

Our Lady of the Lake University

Jeanne Albrecht

Jeanne Albrecht Public Relations

Bob Brock

Highland Homes

Mark Croley

Neonatologist

Fred McCurdy

Driscoll Children's Hospital

Karen Ridout

Community Advocate

Theresa Rosenheim

Valero Corporation

Susan Smith

Community Advocate

Jerry Terry

National Security Agency

Kenda Willoughby

Community Advocate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No