Houston Food Bank

Filling pantries. Filling lives.

Houston, TX   |  www.houstonfoodbank.org

Mission

Houston Food Bank’s mission is to provide food for better lives. In the last fiscal year, which includes COVID-19 response, we provided access to 159 million nutritious meals in 18 counties in southeast Texas through our 1,500 community partners of food pantries, social service providers and schools. Filling gaps on plates, we have a strong focus on healthy foods and fresh produce. In collaboration with our community, we advocate for policy change and racial equity, and promote dialogue on ways to increase access to food and to improve the lives of those in our communities, including services and connections to programs that address the root causes of hunger and are aimed at helping families achieve long-term stability.

Ruling year info

1984

President/CEO

Mr. Brian Greene

Main address

Houston Food Bank 535 Portwall Street

Houston, TX 77029 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Houston-Galveston Area Food Bank, Inc.

EIN

74-2181456

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than 1 million people in the 18 southeast Texas counties served by Houston Food Bank are considered food insecure, meaning they lack consistent access to enough nutritious food to fuel a healthy life. In order to address this issue, the Houston Food Bank distributes food and other essentials to those in need through a network of 1,500 community partners. In addition, we also provide programs and services aimed at helping families achieve long-term stability including nutrition education, job training, health management, and help in securing state-funded assistance

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Distribution

Distribution of perishable and non-perishable food and hygiene products through our network of 1,500 community partners, including food pantries, soup kitchens, social service providers, and schools in southeast Texas.

Population(s) Served
Adults

One in four southeast Texas children are at-risk of hunger, which means they don’t have consistent access to enough nutritious food. Many of these children rely on school meals to provide breakfast and lunch during the school year. During breaks, such as weekends and holidays, many of these children go home to little or no meals. The Houston Food Bank’s Backpack Buddy program works to fill that gap by providing nutritious, child-friendly food for school children to take home over the weekend.

Through the Backpack Buddy program, the Houston Food Bank, works in partnership with participating schools, school district delivery sites, and other community partners, to ensure that the food sacks are distributed to children every Friday during the school year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Houston Food Bank’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) is focused on raising awareness in the service area of available social services and provides application and technical assistance for state-funded social and health services.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

A national initiative of Feeding America coordinated and managed locally by HFB since 2001, this program serves healthy hot meals to low-income children attending area Boys and Girls Club of Greater Houston and other after school enrichment programs. This program also teaches area youth the benefits of maintaining a healthy diet and incorporating exercise into daily behaviors.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

On-site pantry with extended hours to serve working families and individuals who can’t access their neighborhood pantry.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The Senior Box Program distributes Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) food from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that is managed by the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) to income-eligible seniors (60+). Just under 10,000 Harris County seniors each month benefit from this federally-funded effort.

In addition to distributing a monthly box of shelf-stable CSFP food (valued at $50 retail) to clients, the Senior Box Program has expanded its outreach to include distributing produce and other health-related items to seniors both inside and outside of Harris County.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

An innovative strategy implemented throughout the Food Bank that goes beyond emergency food assistance to address the root causes of hunger. The Houston Food Bank – in partnership with social service programs – uses food as a catalyst to help individuals achieve their life goals. An essential aspect of the Food for Change strategy is the use of data to study the effects of food insecurity in two focus areas: health outcomes and economic opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2010

Better Business Bureau - Standards for Charity Accountability 2010

Better Business Bureau - Standards for Charity Accountability 2020

Awards

Pinnacle Winner 2012

Better Business Bureau

Pinnacle Winner 2014

Better Business Bureau

Food Bank of the Year 2015

Feeding America

Service Enterprise Certified 2018

Points of Light Foundation

Winner of Distinction 2020

Better Business Bureau

Affiliations & memberships

America's Second Harvest - Affiliate 1984

Feeding America

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of fresh produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals provided to children through school programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteers.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Houston Food Bank has identified the following strategic goals:

Strategic Goal One: Maximize the Engine; applying our logistics capabilities along lines where we have leverage to bring the most value to the community.
Strategic Goal Two: Integrate the Food for Change model across the organization; using food as a catalyst with education, economic mobility and health partners to help individuals improve their quality of life.
Strategic Goal Three: Greater Houston Data Trust; supporting the creation of a system that will allow service providers to share and integrate their data and provide individuals, service agencies, and funders with the information they need to improve the well-being of Houston-area residents.
Strategic Goal Four: Advocacy for social change and sustainability; advocate to improve public policy and make food accessible so people can live better lives. Engage the community in dialogue about how we can end the need for food banks.

The Houston Food Bank focuses on filling gaps on the plate, rather than trying to distribute all food and nutrition needed for each meal (sometimes referred to as “whole plate”). Our goal is to provide ongoing supplemental food assistance with products that will have the greatest nutritional impact and reduce food purchasing costs for the recipient. We aim to use the resources donated to us to distribute the highest nutritional and dollar value food (and non-food) we can for people receiving food assistance, in order to reduce the financial burden of needing to purchase all of these items for their families. This method of providing supplemental food is made even more impactful because most people who require food assistance do not simply need three full meals for today and tomorrow, but rather they will need help making ends meet for a longer period of time.

In addition to Houston Food Bank's engaged board of directors, experienced executive team and diverse funding stream, the following affiliations and partnerships help allow HFB to work towards its goals:

HFB is a member of Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger-relief charity. Feeding America’s mission is to feed America’s hungry through a nationwide network of approximately 200 member food banks. This network allows for open communication of ideas and best practices in food banking optimizing each organization’s effectiveness. Feeding America hosts department-specific conferences each year for its members, encouraging new ideas and successes to spread across the network. On the state-level, HFB is also a member of the Texas Food Bank Network (TFBN). TFBN unites the 19 Feeding America-affiliated food banks that operate in Texas and facilitates cooperation between food banks themselves as well as food banks and statewide resources.

Other Partnerships
HFB Partner Agencies: Almost 500 hunger-relief partner agencies throughout the service area, including:
• Food pantries
• Shelters for the homeless and survivors of domestic violence
• Nutrition sites for children and the elderly

Houston Habitat for Humanity: Food is provided to families living in newly-constructed (Houston) Habitat for Humanity homes so that home owners can begin life in their new homes with a full pantry.

Rescue Bank: Donated pet food is provided to the Rescue Bank; they in turn provide the pet food to animal rescue and rehabilitation groups.

Harris County Community Supervision and Corrections Department (HCCSCD): HCCSCD acts as the referral source for probationer clients in the Serving for Success (SFS) program; these clients are credited community service hours while participating in the program. SFS trains clients of the criminal justice system for living wage jobs in warehouse skills and/or culinary arts while they volunteer at HFB.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) offers non-violent offenders the opportunity to participate in the Serving for Success (SFS) program; these clients have the opportunity to earn early release for the community service hours provided to HFB. SFS trains clients of the criminal justice system for living wage jobs in warehouse skills and/or culinary arts while they volunteer at HFB.

Brighter Bites: Brighter Bites empowers underserved families to choose “brighter” fruits and vegetables by providing fresh produce and nutrition education for greater health.

Good Steward Global Initiative: Good Steward Global Initiative is building libraries in developing countries. Good Steward collects, sorts, and arranges transport of books to East Africa in order to build school and community libraries.

Texas Hunger Initiative (THI): THI is a capacity-building and collaborative project seeking to develop and implement strategies to end hunger through policy, education, community organizing, and community development.

The core focus of Houston Food Bank is to distribute food in the community.

Other progress toward strategic goals:

Building agency capacity
HFB utilizes agency grants to improve infrastructure and capacity--including providing funding for cooler and freezer space allowing agencies to provide more nutritious meals and safely store produce and meat. In addition, by using food allocation to encourage agencies to remain open extended hours, HFB promotes agencies to serve more of the population, including working individuals.

Growth in fresh produce
Providing fresh, nutritious food for families and individuals in need is an essential component in Houston Food Bank's strategy for fighting hunger. Last year, 35% of the food distributed by HFB was fresh produce – more than 28 million pounds. Through the Food Bank’s Mobile Pantry program, 11,000 pounds of food (two-thirds of which is produce) is collected and driven to a designated site located within a food desert or an area of greatest need. At the site, Food Bank staff offloads the truck and distributes the food to underserved people in that community. Through the Food Fair program, 11,000 pounds of food (over 90% of which is produce) is delivered to hunger-relief agencies to separate and provide for their clients.

Allocation for Change Committee and strategic partnerships
The Allocation for Change Committee began meeting in October 2012. The committee is compiled of 12 members, including a mixture of board members, volunteers and involved community members. The goal of the committee is to develop policies for allocation to support HFB’s Board Goal: To use food as a catalyst for additional social services. The committee identifies, prioritizes, and assists agencies and initiatives to leverage HFB resources. This will help better lives in the potential areas of education, health, counseling, job training and social services. The committee will determine how to make targeted allocation decisions, identify and contact potential partners and establish measurements. Once this is complete, the committee will identify and create some small near terms successes. To this date, the committee has reached out to eight potential partners and is currently working on determining the most effective method to implement the allocation program. One example of a successful relationship is with Southwest Schools (SWS). HFB has currently distributed 8,620 pounds of school supplies to SWS, who previously purchased the supplies. With the resources HFB has provided, SWS anticipates they will save enough money to be able to introduce a new program to the school district. The partnership with SWS is a prime example of the future work of the committee; HFB is adding more value to distributions by linking distributions to programs proven to help clients break the cycle of poverty.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Houston Food Bank
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Houston Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 12/29/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Phil Hawk

Evergreen-North American Industrial Services


Board co-chair

Laura Juliano

The Boston Consulting Group

Phil Hawk

Evergreen-North American Industrial Services

Jeffrey Dodson

KPMG LLP

Manu Asthana

T. Ryder Booth

Chevron

Charles Davidson

Quantum Energy Partners

Barbara Green

Sysco Corporation

Greg Grissom

Houston Texans

James Guilfoyle

LyondellBasell

Lisa Helfman

H-E-B

Santos Hinojosa

Texas Medical Center

Laura Juliano

Boston Consulting Group

Darryl Montgomery

Wells Fargo

Jon Young

Kroger

Ben Samuels

Samuels Family Foundation

Tracy Vaught

H Town Restaurant Group

Mayra Vazquez

Latin Specialties

Larry Wyche

Wyche Logistics & Leadership Consulting

Brian Greene

Houston Food Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/29/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability