PLATINUM2023

STEP DENVER

aka STEP DENVER   |   Denver, CO   |  www.stepdenver.org

Mission

Step Denver gives men with nowhere else to turn the opportunity to overcome addiction through sobriety, work, accountability, and community.

Ruling year info

1985

Chief Executive Officer

Paul L Scudo

Main address

2029 Larimer St

Denver, CO 80205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Step 13

EIN

74-2345786

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the latest Point in Time count of the unsheltered in Denver, 75.7% were male. More than two-thirds of those who are homeless report addiction as a primary cause. The addiction problem is growing in our community and naturally, homelessness is growing proportionately. This creates serious issues for individuals, their families, and the community at-large including health, legal, economic, and safety concerns. For men seeking help from Step, addiction has left them with no financial resources, healthcare, employment, housing, or support from family. They often lack the skill sets or education to rebound quickly.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Step Denver

Step Denver is a residential recovery program in downtown Denver that helps men overcome the consequences of addiction through sobriety, work, accountability, and community.

Step serves nearly 400 men annually, with a program that extends beyond treating the symptoms of homelessness to address its root causes. Comprehensive addiction recovery and peer support services are provided in conjunction with personal development and career coaching, empowering residents to make progress in all facets of their life.

Recovery Support Managers - alumni of Step Denver and certified Peer Recovery Coaches - provide individualized guidance for residents and offer a unique perspective from lived experience, helping Step Denver produce sobriety outcomes far exceeding the national average.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Men

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Step Denver is to give men with nowhere else to turn the opportunity to overcome addiction through sobriety, work, accountability, and community. With support from individuals and charitable foundations, Step produces outcomes that far exceed the national average and affect a ripple impact in the areas of housing, employment, and family reconciliation.

Above everything, our goal is to help men in a state of desperation end their cycle of addiction, take back control of their lives, and transition to a safe and sober living environment where they can become productive, contributing members of their families and community.

During Phase I (Stability) residents build the foundation of their recovery and develop healthy daily routines, placing recovery in the forefront of their priorities. In addition to meeting weekly with their RSM, residents participate in small group meetings with their peers discussing a wide range of topics impacting their recovery. They attend life skills and financial literacy classes to learn how to rebuild and manage their lives. Having moved out of 'survival mode', residents begin to build confidence and are provided the impetus to continue their journey.

In Phase II (Development) residents develop a comprehensive recovery plan and address outstanding responsibilities including financial and legal matters. Throughout this process S.M.A.R.T. goals are set with men clearly defining what they would like to accomplish in their program of recovery. The RSM monitors and holds men accountable to following key steps identified to help them achieve each goal. RSMs continue to provide examples of challenges they faced while working to rebuild their lives in the program, ways they were able to overcome obstacles, and provide hope for residents as living proof that these milestones are possible.

During Phase III (Transition) residents focus on transition planning to include finding safe and sober housing, budgeting for future costs and living expenses, and the identification of outside support services and resources. At this stage of the program, they also establish a home group meeting (AA, NA, CA) in the community as a part of implementing the necessary coping mechanisms to defend against both identified and unexpected triggers that may lead to relapse.

Phase IV (Community) provides a safe, structured, sober living environment for men who have completed the first three phases of the program. Residents can remain in a Step Sober Living Home for up to 18 months in which they continue to meet with an RSM once a week and are held accountable, but with additional freedoms to prepare for independence beyond Step. "I entered the program, homeless, and one year later I had a college degree. I could not have gotten here without the help of Step Denver. They saved my life." -- Former Sober Home Resident and Step Alumnus Michael illustrates how important the additional time was to his overall success.

After program completion, Recovery Engagement Managers continue to follow up with alumni for a minimum of 12 months to provide peer coaching and help them through the challenges they face as they re-enter society. Alumni are invited to participate in small groups at Step Denver, mentor current residents in the program, and attend recreational events planned by the Resident Advisory Committee. These interactions provide Step leadership with the ability to track outcomes and ensure that the program is effective in providing everything needed for addicted men to recover, rebuild a life worth living, and pay it forward by serving those who come behind.

Our History: Step Denver was founded in 1983 by recovering alcoholics/addicts joining forces to help homeless men. They recognized sobriety as the primary solution to homelessness and knew that sustained recovery is best achieved through rehabilitation, economic opportunity, self- sufficiency, and community.

Chief Executive Officer, Paul Scudo, was recruited in 2015 as Director of Programs with the goal of implementing an addiction recovery and life skills curriculum to reduce recidivism. Paul worked with alumni - the first Recovery Support Managers - to create the Steps for Success program. A Career Center was established to aide in restoring residents’ dignity, security, and ability to contribute to their families. In 2017 Step opened its first sober living homes, extending the program and providing men with a softer landing back into the community.

Program partnerships with employers, nutritionists, banking/finance executives, family therapists, personal trainers, and human resource professionals provide specialized life skills support to compliment programming provided by Step Denver staff.

Today, Step employs 21 people - including 17 Step Alumni – and in a typical year helps nearly 400 men. Through their success and with support from individuals and charitable foundations, Step produces outcomes that far exceed the national average and affect a ripple impact in the areas of housing, employment, and family reconciliation.

Of 387 men served in FY 22-23, the following outcomes were achieved:
- 72% of residents obtained full-time, tax-paying employment within their first month.
- 45% of residents obtained higher-paying, career-path employment during their stay.
- 88% of residents reported the rebuilding of healthy family relationships.

Recovery Support Managers conduct follow-up calls to former residents throughout the 12 months following program departure; discussing sobriety, employment, and housing, and providing additional peer coaching. Making contact with those who have relapsed as well as those who remain sober proves challenging; however, Step Denver is able to reach 73% of alumni.

Sustained Outcomes
- 80% of alumni contacted report sustained sobriety
- 84% of alumni contacted report current employment
- 91% of alumni contacted report stable housing

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

STEP DENVER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

STEP DENVER

Board of directors
as of 09/25/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Steve Millette

Aleah Horstman

Jason Pomerantz

Ted Ramsey

Mark Soane

Matthew Tepoorten

Patrick McNamara

Victoria Partridge

Jenee Naples Massey

Luke Niforatos

Jeff Campeau

Steve Millette

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data