Crisis Center

Littleton, CO   |  www.thecrisiscenter.org

Mission

The Crisis Center exists to end domestic violence through advocacy, education and prevention; while helping communities live free of violence.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Ms. Jennifer Walker

Main address

PO Box 631302

Littleton, CO 80163 USA

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EIN

74-2385006

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Imagine having to seek safety from someone who is supposed to love you; being so scared for your life that you must flee while your abuser is at work with only the clothes on your back, the money in your wallet and your children in the car. For many of the Crisis Center's clients, this is their reality. The population we serve is one of extreme vulnerability. These victims come to us with significant safety concerns, complex trauma issues and a host of other barriers that make it difficult for them to create safe and self-sufficient lives. We have seen how violence that begins in the home, and in relationships, spreads into the community. If not addressed, we know that domestic violence is detrimental to families and the community as a whole. The adults and children we serve have experienced physical, sexual, and emotional trauma, sometimes for the majority of their lives. For approximately 70% of those victims, the Crisis Center is the first point of supportive contact.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

24-Hour Crisis Line and Emergency Shelter

Our shelter program includes a 24-hour crisis line and 7-bed emergency shelter for adult and child victims of domestic violence. Crisis line calls are responded to by trained advocates and volunteers who offer crisis intervention, and provide information, referrals and support. If danger is imminent from violent perpetrators, we arrange for victims to stay in our emergency shelter. If we are full, we support the client in finding other safe options. While in our shelter, clients receive assistance with daily essentials for living (personal care items, hygiene items, food, clothing, etc.), therapy, legal advocacy, community-based advocacy, and access to a wide array of other community resources. Clients may continue with non-residential services after leaving shelter.

Population(s) Served
Adults

One of the greatest differences between the Crisis Center and similar agencies in Colorado is our therapy program. We understand the impact of domestic violence and the long-term negative effects it has on a victim’s sense of safety and well-being. Helping a victim heal requires strong trauma informed interventions. The Crisis Center employs Master’s level clinicians who provide free on-going therapeutic services to adults and children who have been traumatized by domestic violence. Besides the standard talk therapy, the Crisis Center employs a wide array of innovative trauma-based modalities that aid in the overall healing of clients, including:
• Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an integrative psychotherapy approach that has been extensively researched and proven effective for the treatment of trauma.
• Animal Assisted Therapy involves animals as a form of treatment with the goal of improving a client’s social, emotional, or cognitive functioning.
• Sand Play Therapy is a powerful therapeutic technique that facilitates the psyche's natural capacity for healing.
• Child Play Therapy is a counseling method used to help children communicate their inner experiences using toys and play.
• Group Therapy allows clients to discuss and process their feelings and situations together under the supervision of a therapist.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our legal advocacy program provides domestic violence victims ongoing legal support and information, assistance with paperwork, and support at court appearances. Our legal advocates provide general information about legal processes, help victims file protection orders, child custody, assist with immigration issues, provide support at hearings, and offer attorney and other referrals as needed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Outreach programs include expert testimony, case consultation, technical trainings for individuals working within the Criminal Justice System and educational workshops for the broader community. Specific to youth and prevention, we partner with Douglas County schools for The Outrage, a dramatic, theatrical presentation performed by teens-for teens, which exposes the threats and realities of teen dating violence. This program is part of the curriculum for Douglas County 10th graders.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Crisis Center's Community Advocacy Program (CAP) is an-evidenced based advocacy intervention that helps victims protect themselves and their children from further violence by utilizing the community resources that a victim reports needing. Community-based advocates assist victims in developing safety plans, provide case management, support and advocacy. Client outcomes realized by CAP include: maintaining a safe living environment, completion of the client’s goals, decrease in physical violence and depression, easier access to community resources, greater independence and ultimately remaining violence free. Currently, the Crisis Center is the only agency in Colorado offering the CAP program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Program of the Year 2007

Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals and objectives are to provide safety, healing and education to stop the generational cycle of domestic abuse. Our programs help victims understand why the abuse happens, recover through a variety of interventions, and gain the tools to become emotionally stable and self-sufficient. We educate the community to have a better understanding of the personal tragedies involved, the resulting public impact, and the economic costs from the growing incidence of family violence and conflict. The Crisis Center utilizes non-profit best practices, implements evidenced-based programs and utilizes innovative and collaborative ideas in planning for the future and sustainability of the organization.

Program outputs include:
• Therapists will provide individual and group counseling to at least 200 clients.
• Legal Advocates will provide services to at least 250 clients.
• Community-based Advocates will provide advocacy, resources and services to at least 100 clients.
• The Crisis Center will provide at least 100 victims with at least 1,500 nights of safe shelter, within our 24-hour emergency shelter, motel/hotel vouchers, extended stay or other short-term temporary housing.

We expect victims of domestic violence served in the Crisis Center’s therapy, legal advocacy, and client advocacy programs will demonstrate positive outcomes in terms of safety, health and self-sufficiency; specifically:
• At least 80% of clients surveyed will report that they received assistance in creating a safety plan to keep themselves and their children safe
• At least 80% of clients surveyed will report increase in their self-sufficiency as a result of services received
• At least 80% of adult therapy clients surveyed will report a decrease in trauma symptoms as a result of engaging in individual and/or group therapy services.
• At least 30% of all LAP contacts will access services.

The Crisis Center has over 30 years' experience providing services to victims of domestic violence. We operate a 24-hour crisis line and provide residential and non-residential services. Our non-residential services include individual and/or group therapy, legal advocacy, case management, and referrals to community resources.

Client surveys show positive results in both our emergency shelter and non-residential programs. The data below summarizes our 2018 program outcomes. Exiting shelter client surveys are positive with 88% overall satisfaction. Specifically, clients reported the following:
• 90% gained knowledge about community resources
• 90% know more ways to plan for their safety
• 90% are more self-sufficient than before engaging in services
• 83% understand the violence was not their fault
• 78% stated their overall emotional health and well-being have improved

Outcomes from our non-residential therapy and advocacy programs are positive as well, with an overall satisfaction score of 95%. Specifically, clients reported the following:
• 97% gained knowledge about community resources
• 95% of clients state they know more ways to plan for their safety.
• 97% are more hopeful about their future
• 89% are more self-sufficient than before engaging in services
• 90% stated their overall emotional health and well-being have improved
• 94% stated their parenting skills have improved and they are able to connect with their children in a healthier way

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Adults and children impacted by domestic violence.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Crisis Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Crisis Center

Board of directors
as of 05/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tim Moore

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data