COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS SAN ANTONIO INC

aka Communities In Schools of San Antonio   |   San Antonio, TX   |  www.cissa.org

Mission

The mission of Communities In Schools is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Ruling year info

1986

Chief Executive Officer

Jessica Weaver

Main address

1616 E Commerce St Bldg. 1

San Antonio, TX 78205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

CIS-SA

EIN

74-2393714

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

With limited resources and staff expertise, schools serving large populations of economically disadvantaged students struggle to educate children whose life circumstances limit their ability to succeed academically. In Bexar County, 234,556 students – approximately half of the public school population – are considered at-risk of dropping out (TEA, 2016). 1 of every 4 students currently attending high school is not expected to graduate, with Hispanic students leaving at 2 times the rate of White students – a troubling reality given San Antonio’s majority Hispanic population (IDRA, 2015).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project Access

Our Project Access program is uniquely positioned to address the ever-growing mental health services gap our at-risk students and families face. Few mental health providers are allowed on school campuses to provide services.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

TQS- CIS National 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of students improved in academics, behavior and/or attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of eligible students graduated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of students who stayed in school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The United States' education crisis can be summed up in one statistic: Every twenty-six seconds, a child drops out of school and into an uncertain future. Students whose academic, social service and basic life needs are not met often succumb to despair and frustration, even though they may be bright and fully capable of achieving in school. Communities In Schools of San Antonio's' (CIS-SA) mission is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life. CIS-SA works in the most economically challenged communities. By focusing on schools with high poverty rates and high minority populations , CIS-SA addresses the dropout crisis where it is most acute.

CIS-SA works inside the school systems with superintendents, principals, educators, and other personnel, forging community
partnerships that bring resources into schools and remove barriers to learning. CIS-SA addresses the total student—because
students with unmet physical, psychological, and social needs cannot learn effectively—and the whole school environment. CIS-SA employs a proven model of Integrated Student Services (ISS). Our vision is to expand quality implementation of ISS to every state through a network of providers benefitting from CIS-SA leadership and services and leveraging resources in their own communities. Our research has shown that attention to the needs of both the entire school and the individual student is critical to reducing dropout rates and increasing graduation rates. A 5-year independent evaluation by ICF International found that CIS-SA has the strongest reduction in dropout of any existing fully scaled dropout prevention program; is unique in having an impact on both reducing dropout rates and increasing graduation rates; and is effective across states, school settings (urban, rural and suburban), grade levels, and student ethnicities. The core of program and service delivery is the school-based coordinator. Site coordinators tailor services to the needs of individual students, encompassing academic assistance, direct provision of health care, counseling, transportation, donated goods, mentoring, and after-school programs.

At the invitation of the school or school district, CIS-SA places 1 to 2 site coordinators on each campus. Our Site Coordinators serve on the management team of the school and collaborate with staff to identify students at- risk of dropping out. They forge community partnerships that bring programs and funding to the school to benefit students. Every year, CIS-SA performs an annual needs assessment to determine what services students require most and how our organization can best deliver the services.

As professional counselors and social workers, CIS-SA Site Coordinators bring a range of resources, connections, and evidence-based practices to their sites. Trained in the model of integrated student services, Site Coordinators help schools identify student needs and create a feasible action plan for promoting academic success. With that plan, Site Coordinators draw upon a network of 70+ community partners to deliver needed resources.

During the 2016-2017 school year, Communities In Schools of San Antonio proudly partnered with 83 schools within 11 districts across Bexar, Atascosa and Frio Counties. Each school we serve has a large student population that need our services so they are successful and on track to graduation.. Eventually, we plan to expand our presence within the districts we serve, and to partner with new school districts. Our vision is to continue to grow the breadth and depth of our services so that all children have the opportunity to benefit from education, regardless of their neighborhood or family situation.

Over the past 10 years, we have seen attrition rates drop by 10% in Bexar County, meaning that less students are leaving school without a diploma. We believe this is due in part to the work of CIS-SA and to the collective efforts of schools, foundations, and individuals concerned with the future of our children and our city. With 1 in 4 local students projected to drop out, there is still much work to do.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS SAN ANTONIO INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS SAN ANTONIO INC

Board of directors
as of 12/17/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Marc Sewll

RSM

Term: 2019 - 2021

Michael MacNaughton

Southwest Research Institute

Marc Sewell

RSM US LLP

Rock Ruiz

Community Volunteer

Velma Guerra

theKFORDgroup

Rosemary Puente

RHP Consulting, LLC

Barry Abrams

Community Volunteer

Sherry Gonzalez

Broadway Bank

Alec Miller

Community Volunteer

John Norman

San Antonio ISD

Zandra Pulis

CPS Energy

Stacy Sampeck

3M

Tom Sauer

Community Volunteer

Stan Tebbe

Community Volunteer

Demonte Alexander

AB Strategies, LLC

Jacob Cavazos

Broadway Bank

Nicole Chamberlain

Community Volunteer

Katherine Doss

Palo Alto Community College

Dr. Adriana Rocha Garcia

Our Lady of the Lake University

Leslie Garza

OCI Enterprises

Haven Jackson

Chase

Yvonne Kuykendall

Educational Testing Service

Lorne Phillips

Pioneer Energy Services

Matthew Thibodeaux

Valero

Ron Thomas

Community Volunteer

Stan Tebbe

Community Volunteer

Chad Madison

HEB

Yvonne Kuykendall

ETS

Jeannie Von Stultz

Bexar County

Julie Strentzsch

Roy Maas

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data