SAN ANTONIO CHRISTIAN DENTAL CLINIC, INC.

San Antonio, TX   |  www.sachristiandental.org

Mission

San Antonio Christian Dental Clinic’s mission is to provide dental care to homeless and low-income Bexar County adults at no cost to patients while demonstrating the loving nature of Christ. Our standard of care is trauma-informed and framed by compassion, inclusivity, and respect. Our operation is conducted in ways that are both collaborative and fiscally responsible. Through access to oral health our goals are to improve opportunities for general health, employment, recovery, education, and self-sufficiency.

Notes from the nonprofit

We have a strategic plan for the period of 2020-2023. It is too large to upload.

Ruling year info

1987

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Gloria Z. Canseco

Main address

P.O. Box 831750

San Antonio, TX 78283 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2428161

NTEE code info

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Tooth decay is one of the country’s most chronic health challenges even though dental disease is easily prevented and treated through access to ordinary, routine care. Untreated oral health leads to needless pain and suffering, causes distressing complications to general health such as diabetes and heart disease, and is accompanied by financial and social costs that diminish quality of life and burden community health systems. For homeless, low-income, or otherwise underserved adults, a dental visit may translate to loss of a day’s wages, a day’s meals, or significant unplanned costs such as transportation or childcare. The reasons for disparities in oral health are largely attributed to socioeconomic factors affecting low-income families and Hispanics disproportionately. Often, underserved adults delay seeking care until pain or infection signal urgency. Low-income adults are likely to avoid dental care as a cost-cutting measure.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Dental Care for Underserved and Homeless Adults

Free dental care is provided to underserved, and homeless adults in the San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas area.  Care is provided by a corps of over 300 volunteer dentists, hygienists, dental and hygiene students, professional and administrative volunteers. Annually, distinct clinic visits average 6,900 and 31,000 completed procedures. The retail value of the dental services provided in 2020 was nearly $4.5 million USD

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

This corollary program offers tuition-free 25-week training in dental assisting resulting in certification as a Registered Dental Assistant in the State of Texas. Six students are accepted per each of two annual cycles.

This program augments our patient care program by providing disadvantaged young adults training and certification as registered dental assistants while providing budget relief in the form of chairside assistance during onsite training.

The program design anticipates barriers to enrollment by assuming all student costs including books, scrubs, transportation and credentialing fees. Graduates are immediately able to enter the allied health field (always in high demand), with hands-on experience, certification, and a renewed sense of purpose.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Certificate of Merit - Services to Evacuees of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita 2007

Texas Dental Association

Certificate of Merit 2017

American Legion

Small Business Leader Award NonProfit Industry 2014

North SA Chamber of Commerce

Dr. David Rickey - Dental Services Director 2016

SA Business Journal Healthcare Hero Award

Certificate of Merit - Services to Homeless Vets 2017

American Legion

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of persons with dental insurance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Health, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Dental Care for Underserved and Homeless Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We do not accept patients holding dental insurance except under rare circumstances. The single holder cited was a disabled patients with extremely limited dental coverage.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Refugees and displaced people

Related Program

Dental Care for Underserved and Homeless Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric is partly self-reported and partly lifted from referral sources.

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Refugees and displaced people

Related Program

Dental Care for Underserved and Homeless Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric demonstrates qualifying applicants who have not been patients of record in prior years.

Number of unique patient visits each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Refugees and displaced people

Related Program

Dental Care for Underserved and Homeless Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2017 data is adjusted to reflect average patient visits from 3 prior years due to inaccurate data migration in 2017.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SA Christian Dental Clinic's goals include:

1.) Providing access to dental care for low-income and homeless Bexar county adults.
2.) Increasing the overall health and wellness of our community through preventive and restorative dental care.
3.) Reducing the number of those living in Bexar county who have been negatively impacted by periodontal disease.
4.) Work with partner agencies to help the homeless population of San Antonio move towards self-sufficiency.
5.) Train and equip at-risk youth and young adults with the tools necessary to obtain an entry level position in the allied health field.
6.) Provide dental residents, dental students, hygiene students, and dental-assistant students with real time clinical experience with underserved patients.

In order to meet our goals to bring health and healing to Bexar County's underserved populations, SA Christian Dental Clinic operates a 16-chair dental clinic staffed by volunteer dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants; dental hygiene and dental residents and students from UT Health Science Center Dental School. Our standard of care is trauma-informed since most of our patients are experiencing trauma associated with homelessness and chronic poverty including food insecurity, chronic health concerns, anxiety, abandonment, abuse, neglect, and compromised mental health to name a few.

SA Christian Dental Clinic funds its services by partnering with local grant-giving foundations and individual donors to supply the funds and tools necessary to meet a large volume of annual patient visits. The Clinic is located on the Haven for Hope campus for the homeless and works with partnering organizations such as City of San Antonio Senior Centers and SAMMinistries Homeless Shelter to identify those who are most in need and provide them with dental care necessary to eliminate barriers preventing them from reaching self-sufficiency.

Additionally, in order to train and equip disadvantaged and at-risk youth with the tools necessary for obtaining an entry level position as dental assistants in the allied health field, SA Christian Dental provides a tuition-free training program to train 12 participants each year, eliminating barriers to access for education.

To our knowledge, we are the only clinic exclusively serving low-income and homeless adults where comprehensive, preventive, primary, episodic, and restorative dental care services for people who normally have few choices for their oral health. We are not only treating teeth, but also helping to bring emotional healing to the people we serve while removing barriers to care in an area marked by health professional shortages.

In order to achieve our goals and execute our strategy, San Antonio Christian Dental Clinic works with over 200 individual clinical volunteers to perform our procedures throughout the year. These volunteers range from dental assistants and front line administrative staff to certified hygienists and licensed dentists. Many clinic volunteers have been donating their time to the agency since its inception in 1986.

In addition to local dentists, we also have a long-term partnerships with UT Health Science Center Dental School, Edison High School Magnet School for Health Professions, San Antonio Christian Dental Medical Association, and Greater San Antonio Hispanic Dental Association. In conjunction with the dental school partners, each senior dental student, dental hygiene student, and general dentistry resident at the school rotates at our clinic. The rotations ensure that that residents and students are exposed to some of the toughest clinical cases in the city while being trained by top-notch dental faculty and providing us with a body of volunteers that help us ensure that a minimum patient threshold will be met. During this rotation, students acquire personal understanding of the culture of poverty, disparities in access to care, and trauma-informed care that often requires practice modifications.

The presence of these students and supervising faculty bolsters the level of care the clinic provides because it ensures that the level of dentistry being performed at the clinic is on par with the offerings of an academic health science center. Additionally, they are afforded the opportunity to work with clinical experts of the highest caliber including the community's top oral surgeons, endodontic specialists, and a number of retired military and faculty dentists.

The total service value of equivalent dental services provided in 2021 was a record $4,934,175 with no change to the basis for fees. Additionally, we reached 94% of our goal for patient visits and sustained the staff dentist position funded in 2020 with a time-restricted grant at .5FTE. Explaining the uptick in 2021 is challenging yet the following observations lead us to believe that more treatment for fewer patients resulted in part from Covid risk tolerance.
1) The most recent comparable value was achieved in 2019. In that year, time-restricted funding permitted the employment of a full-time dentist in the last nine months.
2) In both 2019 and 2021, treatments were dominated by primary and preventive care (as opposed to urgent care).
3) The average patient in 2019 visited three times each year compared to an average of five visits per patient in 2021.
4) To assure student safety, UT Health required vaccinations/negative test results in order to receive treatment.
5) We assume that since fewer patients sought care, there was more treatment time available for them despite a dramatic downturn of clinical providers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve low-income and homeless adults living in Bexar County who are also uninsured.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, intake/exit conversations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Given positive feedback from so many patients on our standards of care, we began the process of formally seeking certification as a trauma-informed agency.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We will not proceed with any treatment if the patient feel ill-prepared or anxious. Patient autonomy is honored regardless of educational attainment or financial status.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

SAN ANTONIO CHRISTIAN DENTAL CLINIC, INC.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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SAN ANTONIO CHRISTIAN DENTAL CLINIC, INC.

Board of directors
as of 09/06/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. David N. Rickey

U.S. Navy (retired)

Term: 2022 - 2023

David Rickey

US Navy Dental Corps, retired

Mary Wofford

USAA, retired

Samuel Escarsega

Private Dental Practice

Arthur Scott

US Army Dental Corps, retired

Lisa Ayres

Alzheimers Association

Denise Bruchmiller

South Texas Orthodontics

Saron LePere

KENS-TV5

Tim West

Locke Law Group

Derrick Cantu

Private Dental Practice

Cheryl Davis

Pricate Dental Practice

Cary Smith

Practice Secure, LLC

Hilda Yañez

Raices Dental Care

Melika Fattah

Private Dental Practice

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.