ESTES VALLEY LAND TRUST

aka EVLT   |   Estes Park, CO   |  https://www.evlandtrust.org

Mission

THE MISSION OF ESTES VALLEY LAND TRUST IS TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT OPEN SPACE, VALLEYS, WETLANDS, STREAMS RANCH LANDS, AND WILDLIFE HABITATS IN THE ESTES VALLEY AND SURROUNDING AREAS LANDS ADJACENT TO ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK AND THE ARAPAHO-ROOSEVELT NATIONAL FOREST ARE OF SPECIAL CONCERN

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Jeffrey Boring

Main address

PO Box 663

Estes Park, CO 80517 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2465136

NTEE code info

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1987, the Estes Valley Land Trust has preserved nearly 10,000 acres of land. This land protects the gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park, critical wildlife habitat, incredible scenery and miles of public hiking trails. Our community outreach and educational events attract more than 350 people a year. With Larimer County experiencing some of Colorado’s fastest population growth, the remaining open land in the Estes Valley is under intense pressure. Unchecked growth will fragment wildlife habitat, threaten water resources, and disrupt the majestic mountain views that make the Estes Valley exceptional.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Land Conservation

Each year, the Estes Valley Land Trust conserves land by negotiating conservation easements with willing landowners.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Education of the community regarding current issues and the need for conservation of open lands and habitat.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Provide accounting and back office administrative support to non-profit organizations, Big Thompson Watershed Coalition, whose mission includes restoration of flood damaged properties from September 2013 flood, flood mitigation projects and creation of resiliency.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Estes Valley Land Trust annually monitors more than 165 conservation easements and enforces land use restrictions on nearly 10,000 acres of land.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The land trust leads and partners in forest health, litter pickup and revegetation projects that improve wildlife habitat.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The land trust is hiring a consultant to develop a community plan that will identify the most important land to conserve and new outdoor recreation opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The land trust provides scholarships to graduating seniors, partners on youth festivals and coordinates an annual cookout to engage youth about outdoor play and conservation.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

EVLT hosts three events each summer. Two are early morning breakfasts, usually on a private conservation easement, and one evening cookout. Guest speakers' topics vary from local wildlife to climate change to updates on the adjacent Rocky Mountain National Park. These events are very popular with the community and typically draw more than 125 people at each event.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Where we work

Accreditations

Accredited Land Trust - Land Trust Accreditation Commission 2008

Affiliations & memberships

Land Trust Alliance 2021

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As the only local organization devoted to conserving land in the Estes Valley, our mission is to preserve land forever and buffer Rocky Mountain National Park. Our land conservation efforts protect scenic views, critical wildlife habitat, public trails and historic structures. We also educate and engage the community through public events, newsletters and service project.

We work with willing landowners to execute conservation easements that protect land in perpetuity. We ensure the terms of the easements are met every year through our monitoring program that utilizes over 100 volunteers each summer. We are one of the few land trusts that utilizes volunteers for monitoring. Wildlife and environmental experts speak at our summer events and educate the community on the importance of land conservation. We partner with landowners, other non-profit organizations and local and state agencies to conserve land.

We have 2.8 full time equivalent staff, a 14-member Board of Directors and approximately 450 members that serve the organization. Staff conduct daily business, the Board of Directors provides governance and fiscal oversight and our members volunteer over 600 hours a year to ensure our conservation easements are upheld.

The scenic beauty and wildlife habitat of the Estes Valley are still intact, even though Estes Park is growing and more than 4.5 million people visit Rocky Mountain National Park each year. Our Open Space and Recreation Plan, developed in coordination with local and state partners, will help ensure additional wildlife habitat is preserved. We have prevented major violations to any conserved property, such as prohibited road building, or clearcutting, by building trust and educating each landowner.

We negotiate new conservation easements with landowners, to conserve additional wildlife habitat and scenic views and we continue to improve our annual monitoring process and educate successive landowners to prevent easement violations that harm the environment. We are also building our operating endowment to ensure the land trust is financially stable, forever, and engaging our membership through enriching public events, that encourage them to be better stewards of our mountain environment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Estes Valley Land Trust serves community members throughout the Estes Valley who depend on the natural and cultural resources of the unique landscape.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Informal individual interviews,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Estes Valley Land Trust staff recently interviewed participants of the Stewardship Corp service program, which took place during the warm seasons of 2020-2021. This program provided a small stipend to community members who were displaced from their jobs due to the pandemic. In exchange, Corp participants pledged to work a total of 20 hours improving lands protected with a conservation easement. Through Zoom and phone interviews, staff were able to solicit feedback from program participants in an effort to increase engagement and effectiveness of the program in the future.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Soliciting feedback from the people we serve empowers them to take part in shaping the future of our organization. Feedback allows us to more effectively serve the evolving needs of our community.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

ESTES VALLEY LAND TRUST
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ESTES VALLEY LAND TRUST

Board of directors
as of 10/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Don Smith

University of Denver

Term: 2022 - 2021

Curt Gleaves

Ward Nelson

Wayne Park

Amy Plummer

Pat Begley

Karla Henderson

Jackie Oldham

Jan Swaney

Alice Reumann

Melissa Strong

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.