Wasatch Community Gardens

Grow. Eat. Repeat.

Salt Lake City, UT   |  http://wasatchgardens.org

Mission

The mission of Wasatch Community Gardens (WCG) is to empower people to grow and eat healthy, organic, local food. Since 1989, WCG has provided children, adults, and families in Salt Lake County with access to land and education for growing and eating fresh produce, while building and nurturing community connections through gardening and healthy food. Annually, our programs and community events serve more than 9,000 people; the majority of program participants are from low- and moderate-income households. Volunteer support is critical to our gardens, programs, and events. In 2021, 1,214 volunteers contributed 6,770 hours of service to WCG.omelessness.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Georgina Griffith-Yates

Main address

629 E 800 S

Salt Lake City, UT 84102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2550359

NTEE code info

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are a number of barriers that make it difficult for community members to access fresh, healthy, organic food. These barriers include lack of resources and knowledge; lack of space in which to grow food; lack of experience in growing, preparing, and eating fresh produce; and lack of opportunities to gather with, and learn from, others in the community who are interested in gardening and healthy eating.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Garden Program

WCG helps community members grow their own organic produce by providing garden space, resources, and education. We manage 18 community gardens through partnerships with Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, and Salt Lake County. 531 households, 60% of which are low- to moderate-income, grew their own food in a WCG garden in 2021. This includes 51 refugee families who participated through our partnership with the International Rescue Committee. We also provide leadership training, resources, and garden materials to independent garden projects.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

WCG connects children, teachers, and families to healthy, local food through hands-on, garden-based learning. The program includes weekly classes, field trips, and summer camps, as well as support for onsite school gardens. We engage the parents at the Title I schools in the program in gardening and healthy eating through Family Garden Club events, and we partner with Artes de México en Utah to offer a Sabores de Mi Patria (Flavors of My Homeland) bilingual workshop series. In 2021, we offered these programs as virtual and “in a box” initiatives, serving approximately 1,350 children and families.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

WCG empowers community members with the skills, knowledge, and confidence they need to successfully grow and eat healthy, delicious food through classes and hands-on workshops and virtual learning opportunities. In 2021, we transitioned nine of our most popular in-person workshops to webinars, serving 334 community members. We also offered free garden coaching sessions via Facebook Live, attended by 209 individuals.

Through our Farm Fresh Program in partnership with Valley Behavioral Health, we provide low-income individuals with severe mental illness with access to organic produce. During the 2021 growing season, we provided fresh produce valued at $5,865 to 50 Valley Plaza residents each week.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

WCG provides farm-based employment, work readiness training, job placement assistance, and mentoring for women facing/experiencing homelessness at our Green Phoenix Farm. Through on-the-job training and weekly life and job skills workshops, the program helps participants develop new skills, cultivate strong work habits, develop key social and emotional skills, improve their health and well-being, secure housing and employment, and achieve other personal goals. We partner with Advantage Services to connect participants with available resources, including housing vouchers. In 2021, the program served 11 women, including two team leads (former participants); 88% of participants achieved stable housing and 78% had reliable employment after the program. Produce grown by participants is distributed to low-income individuals and families through partnerships with other community organizations. In 2021, approximately 2,134 community members benefited from these food donations.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of Salt Lake County residents that participated in WCG's programs: Community Garden, Youth Garden, School Garden, Community Education, Green Team Farm Project, and Volunteer.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through our programs and services, WCG aims to provide Salt Lake County residents with gardening space, resources, and support; teach community members about growing and eating healthy, organic, local food; build community around gardening and healthy eating; and preserve and expand urban agriculture lands in Salt Lake County.

Our primary strategic initiatives for the next three years are as follows:
1) Cultivate inclusive and sustainable spaces that embody WCG’s mission, vision, and values.

2) Intentionally develop an organizational culture that is informed by WCG’s mission, vision and values

3) Engage more community members to opportunities for gardening and healthy food

Since 1989, WCG has served Salt Lake County with a vision of an inclusive, robust, and vibrant community that is nourished by healthy and affordable food. WCG is a respected resource for organic vegetable gardening along the Wasatch Front. We are an effective, mid-sized nonprofit that is grounded in the community at the neighborhood level. We pride ourselves in being nimble, approachable, and accessible to all.

WCG has a dedicated board of directors to guide our work and ensure that the organization has the resources to accomplish its mission. Our staff of 21 includes 5 individuals who have been involved with WCG for five years or more. Each year, we have 3-4 high caliber AmeriCorps volunteers to assist with our programs.

We have strong partnerships with Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Salt Lake County, the Salt Lake School District, and numerous nonprofits and social service agencies. We have also developed a vast and dedicated volunteer base that contributes over 6,700 hours of service each year

Since 1989, we have provided children, adults, and families in Salt Lake County with access to land and education for growing and eating fresh produce, while building and nurturing community connections through gardening and healthy food. We accomplish this through four main programs: Community Garden, Community Education, Youth and School Garden, and Job Training Programs. Our hands-on, garden-based programming takes place in 18 community gardens, 14 school gardens, two youth teaching gardens, a demonstration garden, and a job training farm. We strive to make our programs accessible to all in our community: in 2021, our programs served 9,000 adults and children, the majority of whom were from low- to moderate-income households.

Our programming is effective largely because of the strong community partnerships we have developed over the years. This includes partnerships with Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Salt Lake County, the Salt Lake City School District, and numerous nonprofits, social service agencies, and businesses. Volunteer support is critical to our gardens, programs, and events. In 2021, 1,214 volunteers contributed 6,770 hours of service to WCG.

In the fall of 2021, we completed construction on our new Campus – a project that transformed a 1.2-acre property at 629 E 800 S in Salt Lake City into a community resource dedicated to urban agriculture, community building, education, and stewardship. The project began in 2017 with the purchase of three parcels of land adjacent to our flagship Grateful Tomato Garden. We were granted a necessary zone change in December 2018; as part of the approval, we were required by Salt Lake City to build replacement housing for the three residences that we were converting to commercial use. The resulting project embodies historic preservation and adaptive reuse, conservation of thriving open space in the heart of the Central City neighborhood, eight micro-units of affordable housing that achieves net zero energy use, and new and expanded indoor and outdoor garden and education spaces where we can educate, collaborate, inspire, and welcome all in the community to grow, eat, and prepare fresh, healthy, delicious food.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Wasatch Community Gardens
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Wasatch Community Gardens

Board of directors
as of 09/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ashley Peck

Holland & Hart LLP

Term: 2022 - 2023

Ian Davis

Lance Heaton

Laynee Jones

Ashley Peck

Amy McMinn

Kellie Williams

Madison Denkers

Mitch Dumke

Jenifer Ewoniuk

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data