Crime, Legal Related

Center for Child Protection

aka Travis County Children's Advocacy Center   |   Austin, TX   |  http://www.centerforchildprotection.org

Mission

As a member of the Travis County Child Protection Team, our mission is to reduce the trauma for children during the investigation and prosecution of crimes against children.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Mr. Michael Torres

Main address

8509 FM 969, Bldg 2

Austin, TX 78724 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

74-2562585

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Numerous studies have demonstrated the short-term and long-term negative effects of childhood trauma. Traumatic experiences in childhood have been proven to significantly increase an individual's chance of experiencing PTSD, major depression, and substance abuse in their lifetime (Kilpatrick, 2003). Trauma symptoms also manifest as other behavior and social problems such as risky sexual behavior, teen pregnancy, delinquency, homelessness, decreased academic performance and dropout, criminal behavior, and suicide (Noll, 2003) (Siegal, 2003).
Traumatized children often weave through the system being treated for secondary trauma symptoms, and not the trauma itself. These children may be diagnosed with secondary trauma symptoms such as PTSD, ADHD, ODD, and learning disabilities. These conditions are often not recognized as trauma symptoms and the underlying trauma is never treated appropriately.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forensic Services

The Center for Child Protection is the only nonprofit in Travis County involved in the investigation of crimes against children. A forensic interview is a child’s recorded statement taken by an unbiased professional specially trained to speak with children at various age levels. Children and teens are interviewed in a safe, non-threatening environment and their statements are digitally recorded. Children are informed that they are being recorded. Law enforcement officers and CPS caseworkers observe the interview through a one-way mirror.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Victims and oppressed people

When an outcry of abuse is confirmed, the Center for Child Protection offers individual and family therapy to children, teens and their families so that they may process their experiences and begin healing from the abuse they have endured. Treatment is individualized to meet emotional, psychological, and developmental needs. Experiential therapy services are also offered through pet-assisted therapy and ropes course initiatives and activities. Services are offered in English and Spanish to children, siblings and to non-offending caregivers at no charge.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Parents

Through a collaboration with Dell Children’s Medical Center, all examinations are conducted in a child-friendly environment by pediatricians board-certified in child abuse. A pediatrician specialized in assessing physical trauma conducts examinations of children where injuries may have resulted from physical abuse or neglect; A pediatrician specialized in assessing sexual abuse conducts examinations of children that may have experienced a sexual assault.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Victims and oppressed people

The Center for Child Protection's Education Services offers educational opportunities to professionals, parents and community organizations on identification, reporting and prevention of child abuse and neglect. The information can be tailored to your agency or group and is offered free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Parents

Where we work

Accreditations

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2009

Affiliations & memberships

National Children's Alliance - Full Member 1995

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Unduplicatated clients served across all programs. Both children and adults.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of caregivers who report that the Center has done everything it can to assist them and their children

Number of clients who report that services/supports are available when needed, even in a crisis

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of caregivers who felt as though they could contact their Family Advocate if they had questions, needed support, or were in need of help.

Number of parents engaged in fewer acts of abuse and neglect of their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers,Parents

Related Program

Therapeutic Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Adults served through the Protective Parenting Program who reported that they have a better understanding of how to create a safer home.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Therapeutic Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Therapy sessions provided. All kinds of therapy, both children and adults.

Number of clients participating in support groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers,Parents

Related Program

Therapeutic Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Adult clients engaged in group services including Protective Parenting (all types) and Sexual Abuse Support.

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults,Caregivers

Related Program

Education Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of free trainings provided by the Education Services Department.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our goal is to end the vicious cycle of child abuse and neglect within the next three generations. Our belief is that with timely, strategic, effective and evidence-based intervention we can make an impact that will last a lifetime. Goals are designed to encourage change – individual, social, and systematic. From the services we provide, to the philosophical underpinnings of our work, we seek to reduce the trauma to children during the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases. <br/><br/>Our philosophy is that in order to create lasting, meaningful change, thoughts, assumptions and decisions must be impacted at multiple levels. Children must understand that the abuse was not their fault; and that abuse does not define who they are or will become. Caregivers need to see how their behavior and decisions may have contributed to their child's victimization. Every day, we provide the resources and support that our team members use to become the safety net that children and families need during times of crisis. We understand the inherent systematic limitations and constraints within which our work operates, so that we can best advocate for our clients. We create opportunities to educate our community about the epidemic of child abuse, the causes and consequences, and how we can each play a role in preventing abuse. We encourage people to overcome the discomfort of talking about child rape and assault, because as long as this dialogue remains secretive and shameful, so does the abuse itself. The recent Penn State scandal is a perfect example. <br/><br/>To help guide us, the Center has adopted a model framework entitled “Unto the Third Generation: A Call to End Child Abuse in the United States within 120 Years," by Victor I. Vieth. Four main elements are required to achieve this lofty goal: <br/>• Abused children must be reported into the system, and reports must be high quality<br/>• Universities must teach students entering professions where they will be mandated reporters the skills necessary to perform this task<br/>• Child protection workers must conduct a competent investigation of every case and prosecute thoroughly<br/>• These professionals must become community leaders in the prevention of child abuse<br/><br/>This framework resonates with our center because we have spent the past twenty years incorporating all four of these elements into our daily work with families, community, and our multidisciplinary team.<br/><br/>The third element has already been accomplished through our very nature as a children's advocacy center and our definition in the Texas Family Code. Our work is ongoing, and although there is much still to be done, our community has made tremendous strides in the right direction.

Vieth references Malcolm Gladwell's notion of a “tipping point" regarding a social epidemic of positive change around ending child abuse. One example indicating that a tipping point has been reached will be when people are no longer ashamed or embarrassed to talk about child sexual abuse. Much like the civil rights movement, we are slowly moving in the right direction, but only because of those who have the courage to speak up. <br/><br/>As a children's advocacy center, we embody systemic change by virtue of the fact that our model has completely changed the way that children experience the criminal justice system. In addition to our ongoing work, there are 3 main areas of focus for the coming year which will contribute to our long-range goals. <br/><br/>The first strategy is to increase our presence in the community as a reliable source of training for mandated reporters. Mandated reporters account for the majority of hotline and 911 calls for suspected abuse and neglect. Historically we have always been available for schools, churches, and other organizations and professions that have high levels of interaction with children. Now, we are focused on being more proactive about engaging these entities to invite us in so that we can help ensure that adults, and in particular, teachers, have access to accurate information about their role as mandated reporters. <br/><br/>The second strategy we are focused on is to continue fortifying our relationship with each of the various agency partners on the Child Protection Team. Through this strategy, we will be able to provide access to Center services for more abused and neglected children in our community. Currently we have excellent lines of communication with the District Attorney's Office, the Austin Police Department, and Travis County Sheriff's Office. Consistent leadership and frequent participation at Center Board Meetings have helped to maintain these relationships. Our next steps are to forge better connections with the outlying law enforcement jurisdictions in Travis County, and to continue establishing and deepening connections with Child Protective Services. <br/><br/>Our third strategy to help meet our long-term goals is to increase our visibility in the community. Community education and awareness are keys to ensuring that the plight of child victims is not only acknowledged, but understood. Increasing our visibility helps us to raise resources, recruit volunteers, and leverage existing relationships in order to broaden and widen the safety net for children. Through this strategy, we will be able to educate others on what to do when abuse occurs, but also how to prevent abuse from occurring in the first place. We endeavor to make the subject of child abuse easier to discuss; social outrage leads to social change. As illustrated through the Penn State scandal, the state of Pennsylvania is moving to join the rest of the states that require child abuse to be reported. Progress such as this will help us reach our goal.

The Center's greatest asset is that we work within the system, not outside. We can impact how the system responds to children, and take steps to improve the system's response over time. Two vital components have been essential in our success; the tenure of staff and the collaboration of our multidisciplinary team. Sandra Martin, the Center's founding director, was the driving force behind successful program development, program expansion, collaboration, fiscal operation, fundraising, and community awareness. By her side, are the Center's other top managers who have each been dept heads for 7-18 yrs. Leadership tenure has undoubtedly contributed to our organizational stability and success. As of 1/1/12, the Center's Chief Operating Officer stepped up to the Executive Director position after 18 months of strategic planning around transition. With Sandra staying on as CEO Emeritus, the two maintain a close working relationship to help ensure that the Center remains operationally sound and programmatically effective. <br/><br/>Secondly, we have established and cultivated a strong relationship with Child Protection Team agencies. In an environment where agency mandates are territorial and where cross-communication is not always encouraged, the Center has successfully grown the Team to be the well-oiled machine that it is today. The process for investigating and intervening in child abuse cases in Travis County is well-documented, streamlined, and effective. <br/><br/>Our capacities to ensure long term success and fulfillment of our goals are both ongoing and unfolding. Our history demonstrates a successful track record of creating systemic change around the issue of child abuse. There are also specific strategies in place to help us achieve our goals. We are currently exploring a collaboration with Communities in Schools (CIS) to institutionalize the Center as the go-to resource for teacher training in every school where CIS is present. We also aim to institutionalize training for future teachers while they are still in college. To continue fortifying relationships with our agency partners, our Executive Director has been meeting with the Chiefs of Police in each of the law enforcement jurisdictions within Travis County to ensure that our agency partners remain aware of what the Center can offer to children and families impacted by violence. As our programs continue to innovate and evolve, the connections we have made in our community will help us reach our ultimate goal of ending child abuse. Our capacity to implement the third strategy mentioned above, increased community education and awareness, was greatly increased as a result of transitioning Sandra Martin, who is known as an expert on the issue, into an emeritus capacity. Sandra's ability to focus on community awareness, rather than the day to day operations of the Center, will have a significant impact on our ability to elevate the stature of abused children.

One of the central tenets of the Center is that we are committed to staying mission-focused. Our focus is on children who have been victimized and it will remain that way. Careful strategic planning helps us to ensure that we are staying on a programmatic path that will impact our intended client population in the most meaningful way. Two general examples of indicators we use to track our progress include client satisfaction surveys and impact narratives. Impact narratives are de-identified summaries of Center cases, and how the Center and Child Protection Team made a difference in the life of a child who was hurt.<br/><br/>There are a variety of key milestones that will help us know when we are making progress on meeting the specific strategies mentioned previously. For example, continued meetings with Communities in Schools staff and individual school's administration will indicate progress. The number of actual trainings we are able to provide and the number of teachers trained will also be an indicator. With new teachers coming out of college each semester, our commitment to provide this training will need to be long-term in order to create systemic change. <br/><br/>Milestones to help us track the deepening of our relationship with agency partners and the resulting increased access to services for abused children include number of one on one meetings, the percentage of cases referred to our center, and the number of children served. Ongoing feedback loops and open lines of communication will be essential to ensuring that the relationships forged stay intact even in times of turnover and change. <br/><br/>Community awareness activities can be counted in terms of numbers of presentations and attendees, pieces of marketing collateral developed, increased website traffic and through the growth of our constituent database. Though increased knowledge and understanding is inherently difficult to measure, our ongoing efforts to conduct awareness activities over the long-term will help us make progress in reaching our ultimate goal.

The Center has accomplished several significant achievements over the past several years, all of which are stepping stones toward our end goal. In 2007 we concluded a $9.2 million capital campaign and moved into our new facility in 2008. The new building was thoughtfully programmed to be child-friendly, but to also account for future growth. Once here, programs began to expand exponentially as our capacity was greater and the need for services had also increased. In 2009, we were able to achieve physical co-location with our agency partners by bringing the child abuse units of Austin Police Department, Travis County Sheriff's Office, and detectives from the A.I.S.D. Police Department as well as two investigative units from Child Protective Services and one Assistance District Attorney, out to our campus. Since co-location, we have seen a drastic increase in our team's ability to better communicate and coordinate services to children and families. The quality of an investigation increases with increased collaboration between professionals. <br/><br/>Direct services to children and families have also contributed to our progress in meeting long-term goals. Since moving into our new facility, we have been able to implement experiential modalities of therapy such as low ropes course elements and pet therapy. We expanded our medical scope of reach by beginning a new clinic in conjunction with Dell Children's Medical Center. We built a relationship with the Texas Child Study Center to provide access to psychiatric services for children who need them. We additionally began a pilot program with our team to begin interviewing older (teen) victims of abuse, who were traditionally handled by law enforcement alone. Investing in state of the art technology like telemedicine has also contributed to our ability to provide a deeper level of service to our clients. <br/><br/>We are still working to meet the needs of every child victim in our community. As it stands there is still a significant delta between the number of child victims confirmed each year and the number who are served through the Center. What we've learned thus far is that the most effective way to reach more children is to continue deepening our relationships with our agency partners, who have a legal mandate to investigate crimes against children, and to continue expanding the depth and breadth of services that we offer. Two goals on the horizon include achieving expanded co-location with the family violence team, since there is such significant cross-over between domestic violence and child abuse, and incorporating a neuro-biological framework of understanding to our clinical services program. These two short term goals (three to five years), in addition to recent programmatic efforts, are helping us to meet our long term goal of ending child abuse.

Financials

Center for Child Protection
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Child Protection

Board of directors
as of 6/13/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tama Williamson

Triggerpoint Media

Term: 2017 - 2019

Laci Jones

Wealth Strategist, Sales Vice President, Highland Capital Brokerage

Steve Harvey

Partner, Maxwell Locke & Ritter

Jeanne Parker

Owner, J&R Development

Cindy French

President, French Enterprises

Karen Shultz

President, Brilliant Ideas/Managing General Partner

Amy Beard

Governmental Consultant, Cammack & Strong, PC

Sam Butterworth

Vice President, Wealth Management Advisor, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Marc Collier

Partner, Fulbright & Jaworski

Robert Collins

Managing Partner, The Medicus Firm

George Edwards

Pediatrician, Dell Children's Hospital

Kathy Enfinger

Sales Manager, Austin American-Statesman

Thomas Graham

President, Crosswinds Media & Public Relations

Curtis Howard

Sales Manager, Lexus of Austin

Jennifer Kennedy

Director of Policy, UNT System

Dean Leipsner

CEO, Video proFile Austin

Luisa Mauro

Owner, Marathon Real Estate

Scott O'Brien

Partner/Director, WorthPointe Wealth Management

Lesa Rossick

Owner, Green Apple Bag

William Rossick

Attorney, Putonti, Escover & Rossick, PC

Kristin Salyer

Senior Vice President, Frost Bank

Travis Siebeneicher

Associate, Fullbright & Jaworski, LLP

Shayla Thompson

Patient Monitoring Product Sales Specialist, GE Healthcare

Tama Williamson

President and CEO/Tiger Media Group

Maxine Roberts

Community Volunteer/Philanthropist

Edith Royal

Community Volunteer/Philanthropist

Patricia Ayres

Community Volunteer/Philanthropist

Ronya Kozmetsky

Community Volunteer/Philanthropist (1990-2011)

Eric Mendez

Partner Agency Rep: AISD Police Department

Art Acevedo

Partner Agency Rep: Austin Police Department

Rusty Pancoast

Partner Agency Rep: Bee Cave Police Department

L.J. De Lira

Partner Agency Rep: Briarcliff Police Department

Sean Mannix

Partner Agency Rep: Cedar Park Police Department

Mark Shen

Partner Agency Rep: Dell Children's Medical Center

Chris Bratton

Partner Agency Rep: Elgin Police Department

Bruce Mills

Partner Agency Rep: Jonestown Police Department

Robert Smith

Partner Agency Rep: Lago Vista Police Department

Todd Radford

Partner Agency Rep: Lakeway Police Department

Greg Minton

Partner Agency Rep: Leander Police Department

Robert Snyder

Partner Agency Rep: Manor Police Department

Michael Gonzales

Partner Agency Rep: Mustang Ridge Police Department

William Edwards

Partner Agency Rep: Pflugerville ISD Police Department

Chuck Hooker

Partner Agency Rep: Pflugerville Police Department

Dayne Pryor

Partner Agency Rep: Rollingwood Police Department

Sean Ford

Partner Agency Rep: Sunset Valley Police Department

Rosemary Lehmberg

Partner Agency Rep: Travis County District Attorney's Office

Greg Hamilton

Partner Agency Rep: Travis County Sheriff's Office

Shelia Brown

Partner Agency Rep: Department of Family and Protective Services

David Carter

Partner Agency Rep: University of Texas Police Department

Clifford Spratlan

Partner Agency Rep: West Lake Hills Police Department

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

child abuse, sexual abuse, crimes against children, child abuse investigation, child abuse intervention, abuse prevention, crisis intervention, child victims, children's advocacy center, CAC, center for child protection, family advocate, child advocate, forensic interview, play therapy, protective parenting, case management, family advocate, court school, sexual abuse dynamics group, trauma education, counseling, therapeutic groups, trauma-informed, experiential therapy, foster care, child protective services