Center for Child Protection

aka Travis County Children's Advocacy Center   |   Austin, TX   |  http://www.centerforchildprotection.org

Mission

As a member of the Travis County Child Protection Team, our mission is to reduce the trauma for children during the investigation and prosecution of crimes against children.

Ruling year info

1990

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Michael Torres

Main address

8509 FM 969, Bldg 2

Austin, TX 78724 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2562585

NTEE code info

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forensic Services

The Center for Child Protection is the only nonprofit in Travis County involved in the investigation of crimes against children. A forensic interview is a child’s recorded statement taken by an unbiased professional specially trained to speak with children at various age levels. Children and teens are interviewed in a safe, non-threatening environment and their statements are digitally recorded. Children are informed that they are being recorded. Law enforcement officers and CPS caseworkers observe the interview through a one-way mirror.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

When an outcry of abuse is confirmed, the Center for Child Protection offers individual and family therapy to children, teens and their families so that they may process their experiences and begin healing from the abuse they have endured. Treatment is individualized to meet emotional, psychological, and developmental needs. Experiential therapy services are also offered through pet-assisted therapy and ropes course initiatives and activities. Services are offered in English and Spanish to children, siblings and to non-offending caregivers at no charge.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents

Through a collaboration with Dell Children’s Medical Center, all examinations are conducted in a child-friendly environment by pediatricians board-certified in child abuse. A pediatrician specialized in assessing physical trauma conducts examinations of children where injuries may have resulted from physical abuse or neglect; A pediatrician specialized in assessing sexual abuse conducts examinations of children that may have experienced a sexual assault.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

The Center for Child Protection's Education Services offers educational opportunities to professionals, parents and community organizations on identification, reporting and prevention of child abuse and neglect. The information can be tailored to your agency or group and is offered free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Parents

Where we work

Accreditations

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2021

Child Advocacy Centers of Texas - Accreditation 2021

Affiliations & memberships

National Children's Alliance - Full Member 1995

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers, Parents, Victims of crime and abuse, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Unduplicatated clients served across all programs. Both children and adults.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of caregivers who report that the Center has done everything it can to assist them and their children

Number of clients who report that services/supports are available when needed, even in a crisis

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of caregivers who felt as though they could contact their Family Advocate if they had questions, needed support, or were in need of help.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Therapeutic Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Therapy sessions provided. All kinds of therapy, both children and adults.

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers, Children, Adolescents, Teachers

Related Program

Education Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of free trainings provided by the Education Services Department.

% of clients that make progress toward therapeutic goals.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Therapeutic Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    As a member of the Travis County Child Protection Team, our mission is to reduce the trauma for children during the investigation and prosecution of crimes against children. We serve child survivors of sexual and physical abuse and their families and protective caregivers in Travis County.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2020 the Center for Child Protection established a Diversity Council that is tasked with helping to curate and maintain an environment of equity and inclusion for the families we serve, our staff, and the community at large. A number of subcommittees on the Diversity Council exist to focus on community outreach, internal agency diversity education, assessment, and HR/recruiting. Our on-staff Spanish translator began giving Spanish language classes to English-speaking staff members in order to increase the number of staff members who can greet Spanish-speaking families. Additionally, we have recently equipped our website with a Spanish translation option.We hope to constantly improve our policies and practices to serve all of our clients in a culturally and ethnically competent manner.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our therapists and Family Advocates are in a constant dialogue with clients and their families about their unique goals and needs with regards to services and intervention methods. In addition to standardized assessments and caregiver surveys given at regular intervals, client input and feedback is used in formulating therapeutic goals and methods. Some children's age or developmental functioning may lend itself to a unique sensory intervention such as trauma sensitive yoga or music therapy. Many families who are engaged in Family Relational Therapy benefit from bonding exercises such as working on the ropes course or in the vegetable garden on our campus. The individual needs and input from clients and families is always crucial in the development of treatment planning.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Center for Child Protection
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Child Protection

Board of directors
as of 5/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Michael Shaunessy

McGinnis Lochridge

Term: 2021 - 2024


Board co-chair

Travis Siebeneicher

Dubois, Bryant & Campbell

Term: 2016 - 2022

Laci Jones

Wealth Strategist, Sales Vice President, Highland Capital Brokerage

Karen Shultz

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Amy Beard

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Sam Butterworth

Butterworth, Ard, & Associates, Wealth Management Advisor

Lesa Rossick

Market Ambassador, Owner

William Rossick

The Carlson Law Firm, Associate

Kristin Salyer

Senior Vice President, Frost Bank

Abby Argo

Amazing Realty, Realtor

Andy Black

Comerica Bank, Senior VP/Regional Manager

Brian Boddicker

USI Insurance Services, VP Property & Casualty

Paul Carrozza

St. Stephen's Episcopal, Head Track Coach

Ann Kasper

Self employed

Cassie LaMere

Cassie LaMere Events, Founder & Creative Director

Francie Little

Austin Portfolio Real Estate, Associate Broker

Jennifer Mason

In This Very Room & S/E, Interior Designer, Bass Player

Dominique Mayo

Self employed, Consultant

Nidhi Nakra

Philanthropist

David Nelson

Retired, Former CFO

Shonnery Pettit

Personal Trainer

Gerald Poe

First Service Residential, President

Brian Prewitt

Jackson Walker L.L.P., Partner

Nhi Prewitt

Philanthropist, Volunteer

Derek Rollins

Ogletree Deakins, Of Counsel

Saul Paul

SaulPaul Productions, Owner & CEO

Lorrie Schultz

Fluence, SVP Marketing

Katherine Snyder

Dell Children's Medical Center,Child Abuse Pediatrician

Jennifer Stevens

JHL Company, CEO

Vicki Tatelman

Kasasa, Travel Agent

Monique Threadgill

Edible Austin, Publisher

Lisa Trickey

Elite Financing Group, Founder& CEO

Jessica Ziehr

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/17/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/17/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.